Skip to main content
main-content

Über dieses Buch

A Journey Through Cultures addresses one of the hottest topics in contemporary HCI: cultural diversity amongst users. For a number of years the HCI community has been investigating alternatives to enhance the design of cross-cultural systems. Most contributions to date have followed either a ‘design for each’ or a ‘design for all’ strategy.

A Journey Through Cultures takes a very different approach. Proponents of CVM – the Cultural Viewpoint Metaphors perspective – the authors invite HCI practitioners to think of how to expose and communicate the idea of cultural diversity. A detailed case study is included which assesses the metaphors’ potential in cross-cultural design and evaluation. The results show that cultural viewpoint metaphors have strong epistemic power, leveraged by a combination of theoretic foundations coming from Anthropology, Semiotics and the authors’ own work in HCI and Semiotic Engineering.

Luciana Salgado, Carla Leitão and Clarisse de Souza are members of SERG, the Semiotic Engineering Research Group at the Departamento de Informática of Rio de Janeiro's Pontifical Catholic University (PUC-Rio).

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. Introduction

Abstract
This chapter introduces how Semiotic Engineering, a semiotic theory of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI), connects to culture, providing the appropriate context in which we wish this book will be read. Firstly, we express our assumptions about design activities in general and about HCI design in particular. Then we briefly present our theory and some conceptual support for thinking about culture. The next step is to establish the focus of our research, the design of cross-cultural systems, which we define as systems that intentionally expose foreign material to their users. These kinds of systems are meant to engage users on journeys through cultures and designing them is a very complex task. In this book, we present Cultural Viewpoint Metaphors, a Semiotic Engineering conceptual tool to help HCI designers organize culture-sensitive interaction discourse about the journeys that users may take.
Luciana Cardoso de Castro Salgado, Carla Faria Leitão, Clarisse Sieckenius de Souza

Chapter 2. Semiotic Engineering and Culture

Abstract
This chapter presents the gist of Semiotic Engineering theory and the necessary concepts in it to understand our cultural approach. We also examine some well-established semiotic and anthropological definitions of culture according to interpretive and non-predictive perspectives. By adopting an interpretive definition of culture, Semiotic Engineering research on this topic focuses on systems whose designers want to communicate cultural diversity to users. We use this theory’s ontology to map out and frame the portion of cultural interaction design space in which we are interested and to define relevant elements in the organization of culture-sensitive interactive discourse produced by systems’ designers.
Luciana Cardoso de Castro Salgado, Carla Faria Leitão, Clarisse Sieckenius de Souza

Chapter 3. Cultural Viewpoint Metaphors

Abstract
More than ever before, today one of the challenges for interaction design is the development of systems aiming to attend to the needs and expectations of people with different cultural and social backgrounds. The most widely used perspective in cross-cultural design is internationalization-localization. The result of internationalization and localization is to conceal or neutralize cultural differences among different user communities and contexts of use. We are, however, interested in another situation: one where the design intent is virtually the opposite, to expose and explore cultural diversity. This chapter presents and discusses Cultural Viewpoint Metaphors, an epistemic tool to support the elaboration and evaluation of metacommunicative discourse about cultural diversity.
Luciana Cardoso de Castro Salgado, Carla Faria Leitão, Clarisse Sieckenius de Souza

Chapter 4. A Case Study: Re-designing the AVIS Website

Abstract
This chapter presents and discusses the main results of a case study carried out to assess HCI designers’ and evaluators’ understanding and use of CVM, as well as the metaphors’ potential for informing and improving the design and evaluation of cross-cultural systems. In this case study, our research question was: how can CVM support HCI practitioners (if at all) at design and evaluation time? The two-step case study used the AVIS website both in (re)design and evaluation time. Our conclusion is that CVM indeed contribute to HCI research in cross-cultural design, since they frame, organize and structure HCI designers’ thinking and thus function as an epistemic tool to support the elaboration of culture-sensitive metacommunication discourse.
Luciana Cardoso de Castro Salgado, Carla Faria Leitão, Clarisse Sieckenius de Souza

Chapter 5. Final Discussion

Abstract
This chapter presents the final discussion of the material presented in this book. We begin with a brief summary of previous chapters, highlighting how the main ideas connected to each other and supported the large structure of argumentation about the value of Cultural Viewpoint Metaphors in the semiotic engineering of cross-cultural interactive discourse. In this summary we emphasize that CVM boost the production of communicative strategies, support the analysis of the overall effects that designers can potentially achieve in metacommunication with users, and help them to identify and isolate cultural dimensions of the interactive discourse. The discussion proceeds with a critical examination of how our proposal relates to selected approaches and theories that have been proposed to address issues that are in some way related to the ones we have addressed. Finally, as closure and conclusion we draw the limits of what we consider our domain of expertise, pointing at areas that our theory cannot reach or has not yet reached. The former represent the scope of opportunities for combining Semiotic Engineering with other approaches and theories, whereas the latter represent the avenues that we plan to follow in future work.
Luciana Cardoso de Castro Salgado, Carla Faria Leitão, Clarisse Sieckenius de Souza

Backmatter

Weitere Informationen