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Über dieses Buch

This book is the sixth edition. It is suitable for one or more courses at the advanced undergraduate level and graduate level to cover the field of aeroelasticity. It is also of value to the research scholar and engineering practitioner who wish to understand the state of the art in the field.

This book covers the basics of aeroelasticity or the dynamics of fluid–structure interaction. While the field began in response to the rapid development of aviation, it has now expanded into many branches of engineering and scientific disciplines and treats physical phenomena from aerospace engineering, bioengineering, civil engineering, and mechanical engineering in addition to drawing the attention of mathematicians and physicists.

The basic questions addressed are dynamic stability and response of fluid structural systems as revealed by both linear and nonlinear mathematical models and correlation with experiment. The use of scaled models and full-scale experiments and tests play a key role where theory is not considered sufficiently reliable.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Introduction

Abstract
This brief chapter touches on the basic questions to be addressed in the book and provides some historical context for the development of the field of aeroelasticity.
Earl H. Dowell

Static Aeroelasticity

Abstract
The basics of static aeroelasticty, in contrast to dynamic aeroelasticity, are reviewed and some classic subjects such as divergence and control surface reversal are treated. The discussion starts with simple mathematical and physical models and progresses to more complex models and solution methods. Most of these models and methods prove to be useful in dynamic aeroelasticity as well.
Earl H. Dowell

Dynamic Aeroelasticity

Abstract
Dynamic aeroelasticty is considered and the dynamic stability (Flutter) of linear aeroelastic systems is considered as well as the response to external disturbances including atmospheric turbulence (Gusts). The discussion proceeds from simpler physical models and mathematical methods to more complex ones. An introduction to the modeling of aerodynamics forces is also provided to prepare the reader for the material in chapter ‘Nonsteady Aerodynamics of Lifting and Non-lifting Surfaces’.
Earl H. Dowell

Nonsteady Aerodynamics of Lifting and Non-lifting Surfaces

Abstract
The classical theory for unsteady potential flow models in the supersonic, Subsonic and transonic mach number ranges is presented including representative computational methods and results. The discussion with the simplest case of super- sonic flow in two dimensions and then proceeds to consider the generalization to three dimensional flow, then subsonic flow and finally transonic flow. The discussion proceeds from the simplest to the most complex case and does not follow the historical order in which these subjects were treated. Also fourier and laplace transforms are used to obtain the key results even though other methods were used historically to first derive the governing integral equations.
Earl H. Dowell

Stall Flutter

Abstract
Stall flutter is an inherently nonlinear dynamic aeroelastic phenomena and this chapter presents phenomenological models that provide fundamental insights into this complex topic.
Fernando Sisto

Aeroelasticity in Civil Engineering

Abstract
Fluid-structure interaction occurs in civil engineering applications to flexible long span bridges and tall slender buildings. This chapter provides an authoritative account of current best practices and modeling methods.
Emil Simiu

Aeroelastic Response of Rotorcraft

Abstract
Rotorcraft have particularly complex and often nonlinear aeroelastic phenomena. This chapter deals with those challenges including ground resonance, air resonance and various forms of aeromechanical instabilities.
David A. Peters

Aeroelasticity in Turbomachines

Abstract
Turbomachines also prone to various types of dynamic instabilities and responses that in some respects are similar to those of classical aeroelasticity as described in earlier chapters. However the complications of rotating flows and structures provide new challenges as described in this chapter, also see the related discussion in chapters “Modeling of Fluid-Structure Interaction and Modern Analysis for Complex” and “Nonlinear Unsteady Flows in Turbomachinery”.
Fernando Sisto

Modeling of Fluid-Structure Interaction

Abstract
Modeling of aerodynamic forces has now moved beyond the classical potential flow theory at least in the research community and to some degree in engineering practice. These more sophisticated fluid models are based upon the Euler or Navier- Stokes equations and require substantial computer resources. This has led to the search for reduced order models that retain the higher physical fidelity of such flow models while still permitting computationally feasible solutions as described in this chapter.
Earl H. Dowell , Kenneth Hall

Experimental Aeroelasticity

Abstract
This is a brief account of the basic elements underlying experiments in Aeroelasticity.
Earl H. Dowell

Nonlinear Aeroelasticity

Abstract
This is an introduction and overview of the work that has been done in nonlinear aeroelasticity prior to the last decade. Many of the issues discussed here are still under active investigation. Of particular interest are the limit cycle oscillations that may occur once the dynamic stability (flutter) boundary has been exceeded.
Earl H. Dowell

Aeroelastic Control

Abstract
Active control of aeroelastic systems is a subject of continuing interest and this chapter provides an introduction to this fascinating topic.
Robert Clark

Modern Analysis for Complex and Nonlinear Unsteady Flows in Turbomachinery

Abstract
The field of turbomachinery is undergoing major advances in aeroelasticity and this chapter provides an overview of these new developments in the key enabling methodology of unsteady aerodynamic modeling. Also see the earlier discussions in chapters “Aeroelasticity in Turbomachines” and “Modeling of Fluid-Structure Interaction.”
Kenneth Hall

Some Recent Advances in Nonlinear Aeroelasticity

Abstract
This brings the discussion of nonlinear aeroelasticity up to date. See the earlier discussion in Chap. 11. Much of the recent advances are based on new understanding of such subjects as limit cycle oscillations due to structural non-linearities, including freeplay, and fluid nonlinearities associated with unsteady separated flow including self excited flow oscillations variously called buffet or non-synchronous vibration.
Earl H. Dowell

Aeroelastic Models Design/Experiment and Correlation with New Theory

Abstract
Several examples of experimental model designs, wind tunnel tests and correlation  with new theory are presented in this chapter. The goal is not only to evaluate a new theory, new computational method or new aeroelastic phonomenon, but also to provide new insights into nonlinear aeroelastic phenomena, flutter, limit cycle oscillation (LCO), gust response and energy harvesting from a large flapping flag response. The experiments are conducted in a standard low speed wind tunnel. Similar experiments in a high speed wind tunnel would be very valuable.
Deman Tang, Earl H. Dowell

Fluid/Structural/Thermal/Dynamics Interaction (FSTDI) in Hypersonic Flow

Abstract
Hypersonic flight is a major technical challenge and substantial efforts are currently underway to provide the understanding and technology required to design and operate effectively and safely a hypersonic aircraft for commercial or military purposes. Leyva [1] has recently described the essence of this challenge. The present chapter provides a summary of the past, present and proposed work for fluid/structural/thermal dynamics interaction.
Earl H. Dowell

Backmatter

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