Skip to main content
main-content

Über dieses Buch

The Information Systems (IS) discipline was founded on the intersection of computer science and organizational sciences, and produced a rich body of research on topics ranging from database design and the strategic role of IT to website design and online consumer behavior. In this book, the authors provide an introduction to the discipline, its development, and the structure of IS research, at a level that is appropriate for emerging and current IS scholars. Guided by a bibliometric study of all research articles published in eight premier IS research journals over a 20-year period, the authors identify and present the top 51 IS research topics. For each topic, they provide a brief overview, time trends, and references to related influential research works. The topics are organized into an IS research framework that includes research on the IT artifact and IS development, IT and organizations, IT and individuals, IT and markets, and IT for teamwork and collaboration.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. Introduction

Abstract
The information revolution powered by information technology is changing the way in which knowledge work is performed and organizations are managed. Information and communication technology (ICT) has permeated all areas of business, from supply chain management to intra-office communication. Personal activities from shopping to driving have been influenced by information technology. Technological advances are accompanied by dramatic changes in society.
Anna Sidorova, Nicholas Evangelopoulos, Russell Torres, Vess Johnson

Chapter 2. The Structure of IS Research and IS Discipline Development

Abstract
Following the results of the bibliometric study presented in the Appendix, we define the structure of IS research in terms of five research areas and 51 research topics. The identified research areas closely mirror those in the Sidorova et al. (2008) study. The research areas include IT artifact and IS development, IT and organizations, IT and individuals, IT and markets, and IT for teamwork and collaboration. Our ability to replicate the results of the earlier study with an expanded basket of journals and an updated time frame suggests that these areas represent a robust intellectual core of the IS discipline.
Anna Sidorova, Nicholas Evangelopoulos, Russell Torres, Vess Johnson

Chapter 3. IT Artifact and IS Development

Abstract
In spite of concerns, on the part of some IS academics, about the “missing IT artifact”, we find that a major segment of IS research is devoted to the design and development of the various information systems and IT artifacts. Several IS development topics are concerned with IS development methodologies and practices, including system development methodologies, object-oriented approaches, and error detection and management.
Anna Sidorova, Nicholas Evangelopoulos, Russell Torres, Vess Johnson

Chapter 4. IT and Organizations

Abstract
Organizational use of IT and the effect of IT on organizational practices and outcomes are widely researched in the IS community. One stream of organizational IS research deals with organizational consequences of IT, such as the effect of IT investments on firm value, and the role of IT capabilities in gaining competitive advantage. The second stream deals with organizational IT use and management topics such as organizational adoption of IT, IS planning and strategic alignment, control and IT architecture, outsourcing and labor sourcing, the use of open source software, and IS security and risk management.
Anna Sidorova, Nicholas Evangelopoulos, Russell Torres, Vess Johnson

Chapter 5. IT and Individuals

Abstract
Research of the individual use of IT and the effects of IT on individual behavior and outcomes constitutes the most voluminous IS research area. This area can be broadly subdivided into research on factors in individual adoption and use, and research on personal computing environments. Identification of critical success factors related to the individual use and adoption of IT has been among the prominent research topics. Notably, much of the critical success factors (CSF) research is also concerned with organizational issues; however, because the individual focus is dominant, the CSF topic is reviewed in this chapter. Related to CSF is research on individual IS acceptance and use, research on learning and training, as well as research on privacy issues and trust. Individual level IS research is particularly concerned with three computing environments: end user computing, web-based systems and mobile computing. Finally, individual level IS research includes the topic of IT effect on jobs and that of IT careers.
Anna Sidorova, Nicholas Evangelopoulos, Russell Torres, Vess Johnson

Chapter 6. IT and Markets

Abstract
The Internet is the enabler of transactions between companies and individuals. Related research is generally focused on two broad research questions: (1) how does IT influence the markets (the macro level), and (2) how can trade be best conducted in the IT-enabled environment (the micro level). At the macro level, research includes such topics as on-line auctions and economics of IT and e-commerce. Much of this research is also related to the organizational use and consequences of IT. At the micro level, research examines marketing and customer relationship management issues in the context of e-commerce. The related topics include online consumer behavior, issues in e-commerce and customer service. These topics cover marketing issues, as well as issues related to the individual use of IT.
Anna Sidorova, Nicholas Evangelopoulos, Russell Torres, Vess Johnson

Chapter 7. IT for Teamwork and Collaboration

Abstract
From e-mails to mobile video-conferencing, Information systems play an important role in enabling communication among individuals. A significant amount of IS research is devoted to understanding the effect of the IT on communication and collaboration, including communication between individuals, teamwork, and the creation and development of larger virtual communities.
Anna Sidorova, Nicholas Evangelopoulos, Russell Torres, Vess Johnson

Chapter 8. Conclusion

Abstract
In this book we describe the more prominent topics of IS research and relate them to the five broad IS research areas: IT artifact and IS development, IT and organizations, IT and individuals, IT and markets and IT for teamwork and collaboration. Within each of the research areas, the topics are organized into sub-areas. We present an organizing framework for IS research in Fig. 8.1.
Anna Sidorova, Nicholas Evangelopoulos, Russell Torres, Vess Johnson

Backmatter

Weitere Informationen

Premium Partner

    Bildnachweise