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Über dieses Buch

Aerospace Marketing Management is a marketing manual devoted to:

-the aeronautics sector: parts suppliers, aircraft manufacturers, and airlines,
-the space sector: suppliers, integrators, and service providers.

It presents the essentials of marketing from basic concepts such as segmentation, positioning and the marketing plan, to the product policy, pricing, distribution and communication. This book also includes specific chapters on project marketing, brand policy, gaining loyalty through maintenance and training, compensation, and alliance strategies. The different chapters show the new changes due to Internet:

-e-procurement for the purchase strategy,
-interactive communication with websites,
-e-ticketing for the airlines to reach final consumers.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. Marketing in the Aeronautics and Space Industry

Abstract
Over the last few years the aeronautics and space industry has undergone an evolution which has fundamentally modified managerial practice within the sector. From being a product based industry, there has been a progressive move towards a customer focus one, representing a turning point in marketing for an industrial sector with many particularities.
Philippe Malaval, Christophe Bénaroya

Chapter 2. The Individual and Organizational Purchase

Abstract
Downstream of the sector, passengers buy air tickets for private or company use. Upstream, companies buy planes, equipment and services. Further upstream, plane or satellite manufacturers-integrators also buy components from their suppliers. Understanding the needs and the processes of upstream or downstream buying is the basis of marketing. This means analyzing the individual psychological, sociocultural and psychosocial factors which enter into the buying decision. The purchase context influences the buyer’s behavior. An analysis of buying behavior is also essential in Business to Business, where the purchase is not made for an individual but for a company, involving a variable number of people. To be more commercially efficient, the supplier must take into account the special nature of the industrial purchase, in particular the specific nature of the buying center, the buying process and buying situations. First we will look at the individual purchase and then the Business to Business purchase.
Philippe Malaval, Christophe Bénaroya

Chapter 3. Business Marketing Intelligence

Abstract
Marketing studies are used to measure satisfaction, evaluate potential, discover new openings, verify the segmentation method adopted, reinforce sales arguments, etc. For all of these, useful information needs to be collected and the aim of market surveillance is to enrich the information system (IS). In the light of the strategic importance of marketing surveillance and studies, it is essential to set out the objectives and methods as well as the main techniques needed to acquire, protect and exploit pertinent information. However it is not enough to just have a department for market studies. The main thing is to set up an action plan to best exploit the results.
Philippe Malaval, Christophe Bénaroya

Chapter 4. Market Segmentation and Positioning

Abstract
The two fundamental marketing tools are segmentation and positioning. Basically, segmentation is splitting up the market into homogeneous sub assemblies in order to be able to choose an appropriate strategy for each one (targeting). Then, it is a question of making the clearest distinction possible between oneself and competitors in the mind of the customer. This is the object of positioning.
Philippe Malaval, Christophe Bénaroya

Chapter 5. Marketing and Sales Action Plan

Abstract
Right from the very beginnings of marketing, planning has been identified as an important component. Taken to an extreme, it has made a nonsense of marketing. The marketing plan must be a pragmatic tool directly based on action plans.
Philippe Malaval, Christophe Bénaroya

Chapter 6. Innovation and Product Management

Abstract
The product plays a determining role in company strategy especially in the aerospace sector. Pricing, distribution and communication strategies are all closely linked to the choices made as to the product portfolio. Grids and matrixes for analyzing the portfolio are effective tools for making sure that the company is in phase with its market and has a product range to meet objectives. However, before using them we must look at the experience curve and life cycle in the aeronautics and space sector.
Philippe Malaval, Christophe Bénaroya

Chapter 7. Marketing of Services

Abstract
Marketing was initially developed with products in mind, which explains why it has been applied relatively late in the service sector both in Europe and the United States. Over the last few years, this trend has definitely changed both for consumer and business services. In particular the growth of services linked to the Internet has accelerated the development of the marketing of services.
Philippe Malaval, Christophe Bénaroya

Chapter 8. Pricing Policy

Abstract
Price, which is often a determining factor for customers choosing among different products or services, is a key variable in the marketing mix. When establishing a sales price external constraints (regulations, market price, customer behavior) as well as the constraints associated with in-house strategic objectives (costs, profitability, policy, etc.) need to be considered. While there are different methods for determining the price, the final decision depends on the strategy of the company. Depending on the market response, prices often have to be adjusted. This is in part the case of airlines when they use yield management.
Philippe Malaval, Christophe Bénaroya

Chapter 9. Selecting Distribution Channels and Sales Team Management

Abstract
When aircraft builders and parts suppliers sell to businesses, distribution is often highly simplified. In general, there is no intermediary between the supplier and the customer and consequently, it is possible to focus on managing the sales team (direct channel). However, a product as complex as a plane can also be sold to a leasing company. In this case the latter plays the intermediary role. This phenomenon which began with civil aircraft is rapidly developing in the business jet sector. However, it is in the context of sales to individual consumers that indirect distribution is especially important. The airlines have sometimes adopted very distinct strategies in terms of ticket distribution. First we will look at the main functions of distribution from a logistics and commercial point of view, and then we will discuss selecting and managing a distribution channel. We will look at merchandising which allows travel agencies to best adapt supply to demand and the main specifications of services distribution and industrial trade.
Philippe Malaval, Christophe Bénaroya

Chapter 10. Project Marketing

Abstract
The design, manufacture and sale of complex equipment such as an aircraft, an airport site, or a satellite launcher require a specific marketing approach. Thanks to the work of Bernard Cova and Robert Salle as well as the Industrial Marketing and Purchasing Group (IMP), the project marketing approach has been defined (Cova and Salle, 1999).
Philippe Malaval, Christophe Bénaroya

Chapter 11. Communication Policy

Abstract
In the aeronautics and space sector, communication policy is based above all on individual relationships, as well as on specialized media such as trade shows and the trade press; however first of all there must be a coherent communication policy. In line with company strategy, the communication plan defines targets, messages to be developed, supports, and resources required.
Philippe Malaval, Christophe Bénaroya

Chapter 12. Selecting Media

Abstract
The choice of media depends first of all on whether the clientele is professional or consumer. In B to B, the main media used are trade shows, the trade press and direct marketing. In consumer marketing, television dominates followed by the press, direct marketing and to a lesser degree billboard campaigns and the radio. Public relations, sales promotions, lobbying and Internet sites are used for both markets.
Philippe Malaval, Christophe Bénaroya

Chapter 13. Brand Management

Abstract
Today, brands are of increasing concern to business professionals in the aeronautics and space sector, as well as being the subject of numerous surveys and research. Most of the time, brands are analyzed in terms of the consumer market. However brands are of major importance in the Business to Business field. Thus the different brand concepts and tools need to be examined from the two marketing perspectives. Vehicle of the company’s strategy, brands can be managed in very different ways in terms of brand name creation, visual or sound identity (logo, jingle) and slogan.
Philippe Malaval, Christophe Bénaroya

Chapter 14. Building Loyalty: Maintenance, Customer Training and Offsets

Abstract
In addition to marketing actions, companies in the aeronautics and space sector have developed many tools to increase the loyalty of customer companies including maintenance, training and financial compensation (offsets). These tools play an important role from the definition of the product/service mix to the development of customer loyalty.
Philippe Malaval, Christophe Bénaroya

Chapter 15. Alliance Strategies

Abstract
Alliances are one of the visible characteristics of the aeronautics and space sector. Originating in the seventies, the trend towards alliances has grown over the last thirty years, whether at the level of parts manufacturers, in particular the manufacturers of engines, constructors-integrators or the airlines. Given the importance of alliance strategies on a highly competitive aeronautics and space market, we have decided to present them analyzing objectives, the different types of alliances and the main applications observed in each activity sector.
Philippe Malaval, Christophe Bénaroya

Backmatter

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