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Über dieses Buch

Anybody can start building multimedia apps for the Android platform, and this book will show you how! Now updated to include both Android 4.4 and the new Android L, Android Apps for Absolute Beginners, Third Edition takes you through the process of getting your first Android apps up and running using plain English and practical examples. If you have a great idea for an Android app, but have never programmed before, then this book is for you.

This book cuts through the fog of jargon and mystery that surrounds Android apps development, and gives you simple, step-by-step instructions to get you started.

Teaches Android application development in language anyone can understand, giving you the best possible start in Android developmentProvides simple, step-by-step examples that make learning easy, allowing you to pick up the concepts without fussOffers clear code descriptions and layout so that you can get your apps running as soon as possible

This book covers both Android 4.4 (KitKat) and Android L, but is also backwards compatible to cover the previous Android releases since Android 1.5.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. Setting Up Your Android App Development System

Abstract
These days, you see Android devices of every size and shape everywhere you look. They can be worn on your person, used in an appliance, are a part of your car, or provide you entertainment in your living room taking the form of an iTV set, a tablet, eBook reader, or an Android game console.
Wallace Jackson

Chapter 2. Configuring Your Android App Development System

Abstract
Now that you have an Android development workstation assembled, with those valuable (but free), professional-level, open source packages installed on it, it is time to configure the Eclipse Android Development Tools (ADT) integrated development environment (IDE) for what you will be doing over the course of this book. Eclipse now works "out of the box" thanks to the ADT bundle, a vast improvement over having to "wire" the Android SDK to Eclipse using plug-ins.
Wallace Jackson

Chapter 3. An Introduction to the Android Application Development Platform

Abstract
In this chapter, we will take a look at how the Android development environment and platform works, and how it is stratified within your Eclipse ADT Integrated Development Environment (IDE). To do this properly, we will create the foundation for your Android application development for this book during this chapter, and in doing so show you how to create a brand new Android application from scratch.
Wallace Jackson

Chapter 4. Introduction to XML: Defining an Android App, Its Design, and Constants

Abstract
In this chapter, we will take a look at how the XML markup language allows application developers, and more importantly, application designers, to define their Android application's user interface (UI) designs, styling, themes, constants, permissions, icons, activities, services, and how they function within the Google Play e-storefront, all without having any knowledge of Java programming. Of course, I am going to teach you Java programming in this book, starting with the next chapter, but you could hire people to do just design and all they would have to know is how to use the XML language we are going to learn about during this chapter. It is important to note that these same XML concepts that you will be learning in this chapter apply to both the 32-bit Android 4.4 OS as well as to the new 64-bit Android 5.0 OS.
Wallace Jackson

Chapter 5. Introduction to Java: Objects, Methods, Classes, and Interfaces

Abstract
The programming language used for developing your Android applications is Oracle's Java SE, which was created by Sun Microsystems and acquired by Oracle. As you learned in Chapter 1, Java SE stands for Java Standard Edition, though many programmers shorten this to just "Java" to refer to this programming language.
Wallace Jackson

Chapter 6. Android Screen Design: Writing to the Display Using Activity and View

Abstract
Now that you've been exposed to the Android operating system, and have seen how it works from a high-level view, have learned about XML and Java, and how they are used in Android application development, the next thing we need to take a closer look at is how Android "addresses" or writes things to the device display screen.
Wallace Jackson

Chapter 7. Making Apps Interactive: Intents, Event Handling, and Menus

Abstract
User interface design is built upon the foundation of the Activity superclass as well as the View and ViewGroup superclasses, which you learned all about in the previous chapter. However, without any interactivity in your UI design, the usefulness of what you can do with your Android application is somewhat limited!
Wallace Jackson

Chapter 8. Android UI Design: Using Advanced ViewGroup Layout Containers

Abstract
The Android OS includes a number of ViewGroup subclasses that make advanced user interface layout design available to all Android developers, and fortunately this also includes the "Absolute Beginner!" This is precisely why I'm including this chapter in the book, and only halfway through the book, at that! To be able to implement advanced user interface layouts right "out of the box" is a testament to the quality and reach of the Android API.
Wallace Jackson

Chapter 9. Android Graphic Design: Making Your UI Designs Visual

Abstract
In the first half of the book, I tried to stay as much "inside" of Android OS, Android SDK, and Eclipse ADT as possible, to get a good "head start" on the dozens of core classes and concepts which the Android developer should have knowledge of and mastery of, in order to have a global overview of how everything in the Android OS fits together.
Wallace Jackson

Chapter 10. Android Animation: Making Your UI Designs Move

Abstract
In the previous chapter on graphic design, I covered two dimensional (2D) concepts, such as pixel arrays and aspect ratios, as well as three dimensional (3D) concepts, such as layer stacks and z-order. In this chapter, we are going to take all of that knowledge into the fourth dimension (4D), which is time, and discover concepts such as motion and frame rate. We are again going to build upon all of those fundamental graphic design concepts you learned about in the previous chapter, because you can also apply all of those core digital imaging concepts to animation. Thus, we will be taking "static" or motionless graphics from the previous chapter and turning them into motion graphics which can look even more realistic, because it looks like the subject matter is moving or animated.
Wallace Jackson

Chapter 11. Digital Video: Streaming Video, MediaPlayer, and MediaController classes

Abstract
In the previous chapter on 2D Animation, we covered implementing motion graphics in Android and using digital image file formats such as PNG or JPEG in conjunction with XML constructs to create frame-based animation.
Wallace Jackson

Chapter 12. Digital Audio: Providing Aural Feedback for UI Designs Using SoundPool

Abstract
In the previous chapter on digital video, we covered the Uri, MediaPlayer, and MediaController classes, which you can also use with digital audio, which we are going to cover in this chapter. Since these classes are used in the same exact way with digital audio assets, I am going to show you how to use the Android SoundPool audio sequencing class in this chapter, so I can cover as many of Android's new media classes as possible in this book.
Wallace Jackson

Chapter 13. Android Service Class and Threads: Background Processing

Abstract
In the previous chapter on digital audio, you utilized the Android AudioManager class, which is a subclass of the Android Service class. You also learned about the Android SoundPool and the SparseIntArray classes. In this chapter, we will take a look at the Android Service classes and related processing concepts, such as processes and threads.
Wallace Jackson

Chapter 14. Android Content Providers: Providing Data to Applications

Abstract
This chapter takes a look at how Android provides content in an application, using what the Android OS terms a Content Provider. This chapter covers how to share the provided content, as well as how to access, modify, update, and delete the data that these Content Providers provide. You will also take a look at some of the Content Providers that come installed with every Android OS.
Wallace Jackson

Chapter 15. Developing for Android Wearable Devices

Abstract
This chapter looks at how to develop applications for Android wearable devices, which at the time of the writing of this book, is primarily dominated by the smartwatch product vertical. This market will eventually include smartglasses as well as other wearable devices, once the pricing of these smartglasses products becomes reasonable. Currently, smartglasses cost thousands of dollars!
Wallace Jackson

Chapter 16. The Future of Android: The 64-Bit Android 5.0 OS

Abstract
As the third edition of this book was going to press, Google announced a 64-bit Android 5.0 L version of its popular operating system at the Google I/O trade show. Although Android hardware devices running this version of Android will not be available in large numbers until 2015, I decided to take this opportunity to add a "Future of Android" chapter covering what was different in the 64-bit Android 5 OS and how to develop applications for it. By doing so, this book covers developing for Android versions 1 through 5 and beyond!
Wallace Jackson

Appendix A. Audio Concepts, Terminology, and Codecs

Abstract
This appendix will help get you to get up to speed on the foundation of audio, as well as on digital audio concepts, terminology, and codecs (file formats) supported in the Android OS.
Wallace Jackson

Backmatter

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