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Über dieses Buch

This is the first textbook dedicated to explaining how artificial intelligence (AI) techniques can be used in and for games. After introductory chapters that explain the background and key techniques in AI and games, the authors explain how to use AI to play games, to generate content for games and to model players.

The book will be suitable for undergraduate and graduate courses in games, artificial intelligence, design, human-computer interaction, and computational intelligence, and also for self-study by industrial game developers and practitioners. The authors have developed a website (http://www.gameaibook.org) that complements the material covered in the book with up-to-date exercises, lecture slides and reading.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Background

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. Introduction

Abstract
Artificial Intelligence (AI) has seen immense progress in recent years. It is both a thriving research field featuring an increasing number of important research areas and a core technology for an increasing number of application areas. In addition to algorithmic innovations, the rapid progress in AI is often attributed to increasing computational power due to hardware advancements.
Georgios N. Yannakakis, Julian Togelius

Chapter 2. AI Methods

Abstract
This chapter presents a number of basic AI methods that are commonly used in games, and which will be discussed and referred to in the remainder of this book. These are methods that are frequently covered in introductory AI courses—if you have taken such a course, it should have exposed you to at least half of the methods in this chapter. It should also have prepared you for easily understanding the other methods covered in this chapter.
Georgios N. Yannakakis, Julian Togelius

Ways of Using AI in Games

Frontmatter

Chapter 3. Playing Games

Abstract
When most people think of AI in games they think of an AI playing the game, or controlling the non-player characters you meet in the game. This might be because of the association between AI and the idea of autonomous action, or the association between game characters and robots. While playing games is far from the only interesting application for AI in games, it is a very important one and the one with the longest history.
Georgios N. Yannakakis, Julian Togelius

Chapter 4. Generating Content

Abstract
Procedural content generation (PCG) [616] is an area of game AI that has seen an explosive growth of interest. While games that incorporate some procedurally generated content have existed since the early 1980s—in particular, the dungeon crawler Rogue (Toy and Wichmann, 1980) and the space trading simulator Elite (Acornsoft, 1984) are early trailblazers—research interest in academia has really picked up within the second half of the last decade.
Georgios N. Yannakakis, Julian Togelius

Chapter 5. Modeling Players

Abstract
This chapter is dedicated to players and the use of AI for modeling them. This area of research is often called player modeling [782, 636]. We take player modeling to mean the detection, prediction and expression of human player characteristics that are manifested through cognitive, affective and behavioral patterns while playing games.
Georgios N. Yannakakis, Julian Togelius

The Road Ahead

Frontmatter

Chapter 6. Game AI Panorama

Abstract
This chapter attempts to give a high-level overview of the field of game AI, with particular reference to how the different core research areas within this field inform and interact with each other, both actually and potentially. For that purpose we first identify the main research areas and their sub-areas within the game AI field. We then view and analyze the areas from three key perspectives: (1) the dominant AI method(s) used under each area; (2) the relation of each area with respect to the end (human) user; and (3) the placement of each area within a human-computer (playergame) interaction perspective.
Georgios N. Yannakakis, Julian Togelius

Chapter 7. Frontiers of Game AI Research

Abstract
In this final chapter of the book we discuss a number of long-term visionary goals of game AI, putting an emphasis on the generality of AI and the extensibility of its roles within games. In particular, in Section 7.1 we discuss our vision for general behavior for each one of the three main uses of AI in games. Play needs to become general; generators are required to have general generative capacities across games, content types, designers and players; models of players also need to showcase general modeling abilities.
Georgios N. Yannakakis, Julian Togelius

Backmatter

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