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Über dieses Buch

For the beginner who has never programmed, Beginning iOS Storyboarding shows how to extract those cool and innovative app ideas you have in your head into a working app ready for sale on the iTunes store by using Apple's new Storyboarding technology. Storyboarding allows you to skip chunks of code by just dragging scenes and segues onto your Storyboard canvas. A time saver for sure, but it's new!

Dr. Rory Lewis, Yulia McCarthy and Stephen Moraco — a best selling Apress author, a former Apple iOS engineering group intern and a successful app developer — have teamed up to bring you this book, Beginning iOS Storyboarding. The three authors have found a beautiful way to lead the beginner into Storyboarding and at the same time show old school coders of Objective-C the new and exquisite methodology of this incredible tool.

Even if you're an intermediate or pro-level Objective-C developer, you can still learn the ins and outs of Xcode's new Storyboarding feature, and find new ways of building and debugging your new Storyboarding app. Yup: This book is also for you, too.

In this book, you get the following, beyond learning the fundamentals and classical elements of Storyboarding:

Design and build utilities and a location based service app using Storyboarding techniques Design and build a universal app with a rich user interface and user experience (UX) Create a fun game app, and more

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. Preliminaries

Abstract
This introductory chapter will make sure that you have all the required tools and accessories to proceed fully and confidently. Three types of readers are likely reading this book. One group can skip to Chapter 2 immediately without reading Chapter 1. Another group may only need to read one small section in Chapter 1 and then move on to Chapter. The third group should read Chapter 1 very carefully before moving on.
Rory Lewis, Yulia McCarthy, Stephen M. Moraco

Chapter 2. Fundamentals

Abstract
With the release of iOS 5, Apple has given iOS developers an updated SDK with more than 1500 APIs, among which Storyboarding is one of the most intriguing.
Rory Lewis, Yulia McCarthy, Stephen M. Moraco

Chapter 3. Storyboarding with MapView

Abstract
For your second Storyboarding app, you’ll build a really fun Navigation-Based Application that uses MapKit and CoreLocation frameworks. You-ll use Flickr as a data source for retrieving photos taken around a specific location and annotate them on a MapView. The Storyboard topics include setting different transition types for segues, building Storyboard scenes utilizing MapView and a static TableView, and initializing segue transitions to other views from MapView’s callouts. We will also demonstrate several handy programming techniques, such as dealing with NSURL and parsing some basic JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) data received from a remote server, which has become a great deal simpler with the release of iOS 5.
Rory Lewis, Yulia McCarthy, Stephen M. Moraco

Chapter 4. Building a Utility Application

Abstract
So far in this book you’ve built two Single View Applications with Storyboards. In Chapter 2 you built AlienView and in Chapter 3 you built FlickrPhotoMap. We are now moving forward, and you’re going to build a Utility Application using Storyboards. You typically use Utility Applications when you want to create easy-to-use apps that consist of two pages: a one-page Main View and a second View that comes with a flip animation transition. The Utility Application sets up these two pages with two essential buttons: an Info button and a Done button. The Info button flips the user from the Main View to the Flipside View, and the Done button flips the user back to the Main View.
Rory Lewis, Yulia McCarthy, Stephen M. Moraco

Chapter 5. Storyboarding a Page-Based App

Abstract
Our fourth Storyboarding app is a pretty zany endeavor to say the least. You’ll be building a Page-Based Application that will house a dynamic, electronic brochure that actually consists of 4 mini-brochures. The fun thing is that your “client” is a time travel agency that has the ability to travel forward and backwards in time! We’ re calling this the futureTravel application, and you will learn many cool tools and methods as you use it to move forward in your Storyboarding skills.
Rory Lewis, Yulia McCarthy, Stephen M. Moraco

Chapter 6. Mastering Table Views with Storyboarding: Core Data Setup

Abstract
The last two apps you’ll work on in this book are more complex and professional. Accordingly, we are dividing each one into three chapters. The M aster-Detail Application: bookManager app is covered in Chapters 6, 7, and 8. The final app, Single View #3: wanderBoard, is covered in Chapters 9, 10, and 11.
Rory Lewis, Yulia McCarthy, Stephen M. Moraco

Chapter 7. Mastering Table Views with Storyboarding: Designing the Flow

Abstract
You’ve finished setting up the foundation for the bookManager Master-Detail Application (in step 1 of 3, Chapter 6) and are ready to move on to step 2 of the app in this chapter. You’ve brought in all the images and the info about the books and set up the SQLite database. Cool! Well, if you think that was cool, wait until you see what we have in store for you as we lay out the entire app’s workflow in the Storyboard. Here in Chapter 7 you’ll be routing and connecting elements with such ease it will amaze you—particularly if you ever tried that sans Storyboard.
Rory Lewis, Yulia McCarthy, Stephen M. Moraco

Chapter 8. Mastering Table Views with Storyboarding: Coding the Back End

Abstract
So far, without writing any code, you’ve designed a pretty complex Inventory system that will keep track of items—in this case, Apress books—and add items to the database from the app itself. As you saw in Chapter 7’s Figure 7–87, it all works except that you don’t have any data linked to the app.
Rory Lewis, Yulia McCarthy, Stephen M. Moraco

Chapter 9. Single View #3: wanderBoard Part I

Abstract
In this final Storyboarding app, you’ll build a simple maze-wandering game that allows the user to walk through a 3D maze that has one correct path among dead ends. As with the last app, this one is divided into three chapters: Chapter 9–11.
Rory Lewis, Yulia McCarthy, Stephen M. Moraco

Chapter 10. Single View #3: wanderBoard Part II

Abstract
You’ve now set up the first scene. In this chapter, you’ll add code to the View Controller’s header and implementation files in Step 3. That sets you up for Step 4, in which you efficiently create 17 more scenes! Step 4 is divided into two parts. The first part, Step 4a, concludes this chapter, and for that step you will still receive assistance and guidance from us. Then in Chapter 11, we have you work on Step 4b, which comes with much less assistance.
Rory Lewis, Yulia McCarthy, Stephen M. Moraco

Chapter 11. Single View #3: wanderBoard Part III

Abstract
At this point you’ve now created nine scenes and completed the code. In this final chapter you’re going to complete the remaining scenes for the wanderBoard application.
Rory Lewis, Yulia McCarthy, Stephen M. Moraco

Chapter 12. How Far You’ve Come

Abstract
This journey through Storyboards and iOS has covered the four fundamental concepts of Storyboards:
  • Easily create transitions between views with little to no code.
  • Pass information back from a Secondary View to a Main View.
  • Send information to a Secondary View from a Main View.
  • Transition between views with user-created visual effects.
Rory Lewis, Yulia McCarthy, Stephen M. Moraco

Backmatter

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