Skip to main content
main-content

Über dieses Buch

In this book, Nigeria, the most populous country in Africa and a region in the lowest income group per capita, is used to demonstrate the potential for healthcare reorganization and collaboration with the introduction of “successful” technologies centered around available, bio-compatible, and sustainable natural resources. Our book discusses three of the top killers of children under 5 years of age in Nigeria, pneumonia (20%), diarrheal diseases (15%), and traumatic injuries (4%). These conditions are used as examples to demonstrate the potential for improved pediatric outcomes with treatments engineered from sustainable and natural resources. Furthermore, this book outlines possible action items that can help drive economic growth, educational opportunities, collaborative outreach, and workforce productivity to build a healthy and sustainable community.
Medical technology in the industrialized world has seen rapid advancements leading to increased survival and greater patient outcomes. However, the development and implementation of these resources is not always applicable to regions in need of new and more basic ways to provide treatment. Moore’s Law, a paradigm that considers advancement synonymous with increased digitization and optimization of electronic processes, defines the history of technology. However, the functionality of advanced and “smart” technology is essentially useless in underdeveloped areas. These regions lack some of the basic requirements for innovative medical technologies to impact human health, such as electricity, access to spare parts, computer analysis tools, and network architecture. In addition, the poor physical infrastructure, insufficient management, and lack of technical culture are barriers for entry and sustainability of these technologies. Rather than importing medical devices from industrialized countries, we propose that the mindset and research focus for under developed areas must be on “successful” technologies. Simply put, these areas need technology that “gets the job done.”

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. Introduction

Medical technology in the industrialized world has seen rapid advancements leading to increased survival and greater patient outcomes. The development and implementation of these resources is not always applicable to regions in need of new and more basic ways to provide treatment. Moore’s Law, a paradigm that considers advancement synonymous with increased digitization and optimization of electronic processes, defines the history of technology. However, the functionality of advanced and “smart” technology is essentially useless in underdeveloped areas. These regions lack some of the basic requirements for innovative medical technologies to impact human health, such as electricity, access to spare parts, computer analysis tools, and network architecture. In addition, the poor physical infrastructure, insufficient management, and lack of technical culture are barriers to entry and sustainability of these technologies. Rather than importing medical devices from industrialized countries, we propose that the mindset and research focus for underdeveloped areas must be on “successful” technologies. Simply put, these areas need technology that “gets the job done.” In this book, Nigeria, the most populous country in Africa and a region in the lowest income group per capita, is used to demonstrate the potential for healthcare reorganization and collaboration with the introduction of “successful” technologies centered around available, biocompatible, and sustainable natural resources. Our book discusses three of the top killers of children under 5 years of age in Nigeria, pneumonia (20%), diarrheal diseases (15%), and traumatic injuries (4%). These conditions are used as examples to demonstrate the potential for improved pediatric outcomes with treatments engineered from sustainable and natural resources. Furthermore, this book outlines possible action items that can help drive economic growth, educational opportunities, collaborative outreach, and workforce productivity to build a healthy and sustainable community.

Adam A. Tracy, Sujata K. Bhatia, Krish W. Ramadurai

Chapter 2. Biomaterials to Treat Pediatric Medical Conditions

Given the growing global burden of disease, novel treatment strategies are needed to address a multitude of health maladies and conditions. In acknowledging this, we use Nigeria as case study where feasible, functional interventions that utilize bio-based materials can be deployed infield at healthcare facilities to improve healthcare access, delivery, and most importantly, the quality of life for people. As previously mentioned, pneumonia, diarrheal disease, and traumatic injuries are among the top causes of morbidity and mortality for children under the age of 5 in countries such as Nigeria. In this chapter, each condition is discussed in terms of the clinical prognosis, current shortfalls in mechanisms for treatment, and the role-specific biomaterials could play in improving outcomes. The primary agricultural crops considered are soybeans, corn, and kenaf, for the introduction of biomaterials to manage these complex diseases, pathologies, and traumatic injuries.

Adam A. Tracy, Sujata K. Bhatia, Krish W. Ramadurai

Chapter 3. Impact of Biomaterials on Health and Economic Development

Improving the medical outcomes for pneumonia, traumatic injuries, and diarrheal diseases extends beyond the overall health of affected individuals. The health of a country is innately tied to the corresponding wealth of that country, in which healthy individuals foster increased productivity and economic gains on both local-level and macro-level scales. In acknowledging this, there are additional steps that Nigeria can consider in the area of biomaterials science that may lead to greater health and economic sustainability. The primary concern is the health of future generations in combating conditions and morbidities that afflict the youth population and human capital development and minimizing the risks associated with increased economies of scale related to the future development of bio-economies. Biomaterials have the potential to foster advancements on multiple fronts but require an integrative approach to making sure that future initiatives are both sustainable in nature as well as help those that are in need of these interventions the most.

Adam A. Tracy, Sujata K. Bhatia, Krish W. Ramadurai

Chapter 4. Discussion and Conclusions

Biomaterials derived from natural resources have demonstrated significant promise for medical use in the modern era and have steadily been gaining ground in developing countries such as Nigeria. Development of “successful technologies” in the form of natural therapeutics and that utilize bio-based materials could help to potentially lower the barrier to adequate healthcare access and delivery in a multitude of ways. Locally designed and manufactured medical devices and supplies can be fabricated with biomaterials derived from natural, native resources and can be customized to further cater the healthcare needs of the people of Nigeria. Although the initial capital expenditure and investment can be quite high in order to build the infrastructure to support the generation and distribution of biomaterials, the decreased dependence on imported and donated medical supplies, devices, and products could lead to more cost-efficient and sustainable solutions in the future. The true test lies in making the key connections between agriculture, engineering, human capital development, and medicine which is an integral step in improving economic and healthcare outcomes in the future of Nigeria.

Adam A. Tracy, Sujata K. Bhatia, Krish W. Ramadurai

Backmatter

Weitere Informationen

Premium Partner

Neuer Inhalt

BranchenIndex Online

Die B2B-Firmensuche für Industrie und Wirtschaft: Kostenfrei in Firmenprofilen nach Lieferanten, Herstellern, Dienstleistern und Händlern recherchieren.

Whitepaper

- ANZEIGE -

Best Practices für die Mitarbeiter-Partizipation in der Produktentwicklung

Unternehmen haben das Innovationspotenzial der eigenen Mitarbeiter auch außerhalb der F&E-Abteilung erkannt. Viele Initiativen zur Partizipation scheitern in der Praxis jedoch häufig. Lesen Sie hier  - basierend auf einer qualitativ-explorativen Expertenstudie - mehr über die wesentlichen Problemfelder der mitarbeiterzentrierten Produktentwicklung und profitieren Sie von konkreten Handlungsempfehlungen aus der Praxis.
Jetzt gratis downloaden!

Bildnachweise