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Über dieses Buch

This book describes the history, origin and basic characteristics of bioactive materials. It includes a chapter dedicated to hydroxyapatite mineral, its formation and its bioactive properties. The authors address how cytotoxicity is a determining step for bioactivity. Applications of bioactive materials in the contexts of tissue regeneration, bone regeneration and cancer therapy are also covered. Silicate, metallic and mesoporous glasses are described, as well as the challenges and future prospects of research in this field.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. Biomaterials Influencing Human Lives

Abstract
Biomaterial development has influenced human lives to a large extent by its versatile medical applications and very promising future. The field of biomaterials has been experiencing steady and strong growth as large number of pharmaceutical firms and manufacturer companies are investing in the production and development of new commercialized biomaterial products.
Gurbinder Kaur

Chapter 2. PolymersPolymers as Bioactive Materials-I: Natural and Non-degradable Polymers

Abstract
Over the past decade, the use of polymeric materials has increased tremendously. Polymeric materials have found wide applications in bone, vascular, skin, cartilage, and liner regeneration.
Gurbinder Kaur

Chapter 3. PolymersPolymers as Bioactive Materials II: Synthetic/Biodegradable PolymersBiodegradable Polymers and CompositesComposites

Abstract
In the previous chapter, we have discussed the natural biodegradable polymers, which are usually degraded by enzymes. In this chapter, we will discuss the main synthetic polymers generally degraded hydrolytically.
Gurbinder Kaur

Chapter 4. Biodegradable MetalsBiodegradable Metals as Bioactive Materials

Abstract
In 1895, Lane first introduced metal plates for bone implants. Due to the corrosion-related problems of metals, 18–8 stainless steels were introduced in the 1920s, which attracted the attention of many clinical researchers due to its corrosion-resistant properties. Since 2000, the research interest is more inclined toward the synthesis and applications of biodegradable metals.
Gurbinder Kaur

Chapter 5. The Potential of GlassesGlasses /CeramicsCeramics as Bioactive MaterialsBioactive Materials

Abstract
The composition flexibility for polymers provides them with their unique characteristics, but their low mechanical strength cannot withstand the stresses required in many applications. The use of biodegradable polymer scaffolds for the regeneration of bones is limited and challenging. These polymers lack a mechanically biocompatible hydroxyapatite (HAp) inorganic phase.
Gurbinder Kaur

Chapter 6. ApatitesApatites : A Mark of BioactivityBioactivity

Abstract
Bioceramics are employed to perform biologically inert roles since 1970, and especially hydroxyapatite has been the most extensively investigated bioceramics due to its excellent interaction with the host tissues. The lattice structure of apatites is quite similar to the bones and therefore regarded as a tool for improving bone regeneration and tissue biocompatibility. This chapter would review the apatites, their nature, composition, and deposition mechanism.
Gurbinder Kaur

Chapter 7. Mechanical Behavior of Bioactive Glasses/Ceramics

Abstract
The properties of glasses and ceramics shall be guided according to the application so as to improve their in vivo performances. Bioactive glasses have attained wide attention as implant materials, especially for the orthopedic applications. For the implant materials, the mechanical behavior of materials should be well understood for predicting the failure and hence crack propagation.
Gurbinder Kaur

Chapter 8. Influence of Preparation Techniques on the Properties of Bioactive GlassesBioactive Glasses

Abstract
Usually two techniques are followed for the glass fabrication, i.e., sol-gel and melt-quenching. Melt-quenching provides glasses with high mechanical properties such as enhanced hardness, flexural strength, and fracture toughness. In contrast to this, the sol-gel method endows the glass with uniform pore size, homogeneity, high surface area, and enhanced bioactive formation.
Gurbinder Kaur

Chapter 9. Bioactive Glasses in AngiogenesisAngiogenesis and Wound HealingWound Healing : Soft Tissue RepairSoft Tissue Repair

Abstract
Bioactive glasses have shown immense potential in the field of orthopedics and dental applications. Many research articles have been published over years based on the tissue engineering and orthopedic/bone regeneration capabilities of bioactive glasses.
Gurbinder Kaur

Chapter 10. Bulk Metallic GlassesBulk Metallic Glasses for Healthcare: State of the Art and Prospects for the Future

Abstract
The implantation of material inside the human body is based on the material selection and hence can be designed as per the specific requirement. Metallic alloys have found widespread applications in the biomedical engineering and the biocompatibility can be enhanced due to sophistication of metallurgical aspects of fabrication.
Gurbinder Kaur, J.C. Mauro

Chapter 11. Future Perspectives of Bioactive Glasses for the Clinical Applications

Abstract
Tissue engineering is continuously evolving as an exciting and multidisciplinary field aiming to develop biological substitutes to restore, replace, or regenerate defective tissues. Scaffolds, cells, and growth-stimulating signals are the basic components of tissue engineering. However, researchers often encounter an enormous variety of choices when selecting scaffolds for tissue engineering. Typically, glass, ceramics, or polymeric biomaterials are used for making scaffolds, which provide the structural support for cell attachment and subsequent tissue development.
V. Kumar, G. Pickrell, S.G. Waldrop, N. Sriranganathan

Backmatter

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