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Über dieses Buch

This book addresses two interrelated discourses of crisis in contemporary Europe: the migrant crisis vs. the economic crisis. The chapters shed light on the thread that links these two issues by first examining immigration and the transformations regarding its control and administration via border technologies, as well as on the centrality of the body as a means and carrier of border within contemporary biopolitical societies. In a second step, the authors proceed to a genealogy of the current discourses regarding the financial and political crisis through a Foucauldian and Lacanian perspective, focusing on the co-articulation of scientific knowledge and biopolitical power in Western societies.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Within the Walls: Transformations of Migration Control and Management

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. Introduction: Within the Walls

Abstract
This chapter is a short introduction into the subject of Part I of the present book, having as a point of departure the recent transformations in European border and migration politics. Through a series of critical questions, the key points regarding the so-called migration crisis will be presented.
Thanasis Lagios, Vasia Lekka, Grigoris Panoutsopoulos

Chapter 2. “Migrants” vis-à-vis “Refugees”: Towards a “Rationalisation” of Migration Control and Management

Abstract
Since summer 2015 and the wave of mass migration, the dominant political discourse systematically attempts to consolidate anew a crucial dichotomy between “migrants” and “refugees”. This chapter focuses on this dichotomy that is actually linked to specific EU preconditions and criteria. The aim of this chapter is to uncover the concomitant “rationalisation” of migration control and management that is in direct correlation with this dichotomy and, consequently, with the construction of migrants’ identity and their future within Western societies.
Thanasis Lagios, Vasia Lekka, Grigoris Panoutsopoulos

Chapter 3. Opening and Closing Borders: Capitalism Is Speeding Up

Abstract
This chapter focuses on the recent transformations of migration management; namely, on the transition from migrants’ exclusion to refugees’ temporary acceptance as a useful labour force in several European countries. The impermanent opening of the European borders in 2015 led to the conditional acceptance of a number of refugees, aiming at their exploitation as another gear of capitalism. As we attempt to highlight, it is the most qualified and disciplined bodies that have the “chance” to settle and work in central and northern capitalist Europe, after a long process of evaluation and classification of their own subjectivity.
Thanasis Lagios, Vasia Lekka, Grigoris Panoutsopoulos

Chapter 4. Borders’ Diffusion as a Response to the “Humanist Crisis”: Towards a Military-Humanitarian Nexus

Abstract
This chapter focuses on the current rhetoric regarding borders and the European migration policy that are built on two complementary foundations. On the one hand, migrants are represented as a multiform “threat” that violently invades the European territory and, on the other hand, as a helpless “victim” revealing a deep “humanist crisis”. Our purpose is to study this humanitarian-military nexus of European migration politics that is based upon “states of emergency”, such as in Lampedusa and Idomeni, leading to borders’ constant transformation and diffusion.
Thanasis Lagios, Vasia Lekka, Grigoris Panoutsopoulos

Chapter 5. Borders and Bodies in Twenty-First-Century Biopolitical Societies: The Migrant’s Body as Carrier of the Border

Abstract
Within the new digital borders of Europe and the introduction of biometrics in migration control and management, the human body has received a greater significance and has become the par excellence border. This chapter focuses on the migrant’s body as carrier of limitations, dichotomies and borders, and, consequently, on the examination of the functions of racism within the frame of twenty-first-century biopolitical societies.
Thanasis Lagios, Vasia Lekka, Grigoris Panoutsopoulos

Chapter 6. Conclusion: Facing a Circulus Vitiosus?

Abstract
This chapter focuses on the presentation of the conclusions of Part I of the book. Having as a point of departure some 2017 key events in relation to migration, this chapter aims at delineating the basic deductions of Part I through a series of questions and critical assumptions.
Thanasis Lagios, Vasia Lekka, Grigoris Panoutsopoulos

Humanist or Capitalist Crisis? Notes and Remarks Concerning a False Dilemma

Frontmatter

Chapter 7. Exergum

Abstract
This chapter is the “Introduction” of Part II of the present book. It is centered on three quotes (by Marx, Lacan and Foucault) that serve as anchor points for the main questions that will be discussed. These quotes are interrelated through three signifiers: capitalism, crisis, subject. A comment on the genealogy and etymology of the signifier “humanism” accompanies them, in order to show the thread that links these signifiers throughout modernity.
Thanasis Lagios, Vasia Lekka, Grigoris Panoutsopoulos

Chapter 8. Discourses on Crisis and Critical Discourse

Abstract
In this chapter, the discussion revolves around the discourses about the 2007–8 financial crisis and the paradoxical interpretations that were circulated in the ranks of both dominant and critical discourse. The paradox lies in the fact that, while the crisis was initially interpreted as a “capitalist” one, very soon a displacement of the signifiers took place, and its interpretation as “humanist” became the dominant one. This displacement is based on a repression and oblivion of capitalist function and its historical link with modern subjectivity.
Thanasis Lagios, Vasia Lekka, Grigoris Panoutsopoulos

Chapter 9. The Man Without Qualities in a Universe Full of Quantities

Abstract
Having as a starting point Robert Musil’s masterpiece The Man Without Qualities, the tension between Enlightenment and Humanism is under discussion and examination. This tension is articulated as a linguistic clash between scientific and literary discourse and is inscribed onto the ec-centric character of modern subjectivity and the experience of “void” within the context of modern capitalist society. However, this ec-centricity is not merely subjective, but it is an objective characteristic of modern science and art, and a structural feature of the crisis of representation in both fields, as the historicalization of the crisis shows.
Thanasis Lagios, Vasia Lekka, Grigoris Panoutsopoulos

Chapter 10. Genealogy and the Question of the Present: A Conclusion?

Abstract
In the final chapter, the emphasis is put on the relation between the critical discourse and the genealogical reading of history under a materialist and historical perspective, in order to raise questions regarding the current syntax of power relations and knowledge in the historical conjuncture of neoliberal homo œconomicus.
Thanasis Lagios, Vasia Lekka, Grigoris Panoutsopoulos

Backmatter

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