Skip to main content
main-content

Über dieses Buch

​​​​​​Now more than ever, marketing is assuming a key boundary-spanning role—a role that also redefined the composition of the marketing organization. In this Brief, the marketing organization’s integrative and mutually reinforcing components of marketing activities, customer value-creating processes, networks, and stakeholders are delineated within their boundary-spanning roles. Expanding upon his article published in the Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science in 2011, Tomas Hult draws thematic marketing insights from the integration of thirty-one organization theories to advance knowledge on the boundary-spanning marketing organization within four areas: strategic marketing resources, marketing leadership and decision making, network alliances and collaborations, and the domestic and global marketplace.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. Introduction

Abstract
Research on the role of marketing in organizations has typically adopted either a functional or a cross-functional perspective. Moorman and Rust (1999, p. 181) describe a functional marketing organization as having “the concentration of the responsibility for marketing activities (knowledge and skills) within a group of specialists in the organization.” Workman et al. (1998, p. 32) defines “cross-functional dispersion of marketing activities as the extent to which functional groups, other than marketing, are involved in traditional marketing activities.” While there has been a tendency in the marketing literature in the last 2 decades to increasingly emphasize the cross-functional perspective over the functional perspective (Moorman and Rust 1999), each perspective and its potential combinative effects (Kogut and Zander 1992) has key implications for the marketing organization (Workman et al. 1998). More importantly, each perspective is rooted in the idea of a set of marketing activities being performed by marketing specialists and/or nonspecialists.
G. Tomas M. Hult

Chapter 2. A Theory of the Boundary-Spanning Marketing Organization

Abstract
The theory of the firm (Coase 1937) provides the theoretical underpinnings for the firm as an integrated and defined unit based on four basic themes: (1) the reason for the existence of the firm, (2) the logical boundaries of the firm, (3) the organization of the firm, and (4) the heterogeneity of the firm’s actions. For example, the basic issues regarding the firm’s existence include: why do firms emerge, and why are not all transactions mediated by the marketplace? Boundary issues include: why is the boundary between the firm and the marketplace defined as it is (which transactions should reasonably be performed internally, and which should be performed externally)? The notion of the firm’s organization addresses: why are firms structured in a boundary-defining way, and what are the roles of formal and informal relationships? The heterogeneity of the firm captures questions such as: what drives the actions by the firm and the firm’s resulting performance?
G. Tomas M. Hult

Chapter 3. Organization Theories Can Inform Research on the Marketing Organization

Abstract
To advance research, the theoretical integration of marketing activities, customer value-creating processes, networks, and stakeholders in the boundary-spanning marketing organization can be informed by a number of organization theories (cf. Ketchen and Hult 2007a, b, 2011; Wind 2009). Thirty-one theories appear particularly applicable to inform work on the marketing organization as conceptualized within the confines of MOR theory (a listing of the 31 organization theories can be found in Table 1.2). These 31 theories have emerged as potentially insightful for studying marketing organizations (cf. Workman et al. 1998) and strategic marketing phenomena (cf. Varadarajan 2010). At the outset, it is important to realize that these 31 organization theories have different arguments, units of analysis, assumptions, antecedents, and/or consequences. It is also important to note that the 31 theories can be used within organizational settings, although an argument can be made that some of them are not necessarily “organization theories” by their origin. Importantly, while a complete integration of any pair of theories is difficult, an integration of 31 theories is impossible. Instead, what I intend to accomplish is to draw out the most applicable aspects of each of the 31 organization theories within the context of the boundary-spanning marketing organization. The idea is that each theory has a unique ability to explain and predict certain aspects of the boundary-spanning marketing organization which cannot be as effectively or efficiently done by another theory.
G. Tomas M. Hult

Chapter 4. Discussion, Insights, and Implications

Abstract
The delineation of a theory of the boundary-spanning marketing organization (MOR theory) and the insights gleaned from 31 organization theories for its existence, activities, and viability offer a broad understanding of the boundaries of marketing at the organizational level. With a few exceptions (e.g., resource-based view, network theory), each theory is given a relatively equal importance weighting. Future studies on the marketing organization should consider developing a weighted schema of relevant theories (cf. Miner 2003). For the purpose of this SpringerBrief, an extension and more elaborate version of the Hult (2011b) article in the Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science, the cross-fertilization of organization theories clustered into four logical themes creates unique implications that can help advance work on the marketing organization. In elaborating on these implications, a focus on the intellectual clusters of strategic marketing resources, marketing leadership, and decision-making, network alliances and collaborations, and the domestic and global marketplace will continue as the structural roadmap for the discussion.
G. Tomas M. Hult

Backmatter

Weitere Informationen