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Über dieses Buch

Resilience is a word that is used in many different ways in different contexts, this new and innovative book focuses on psychological resilience in the workplace, examining other key aspects such as physical health and resilient teams, drawing from the latest research and the authors own practical experience.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Introduction—Setting the Scene

Introduction—Setting the Scene

Abstract
The focus of this book is on building individual resilience—also known as psychological, emotional, or personal resilience. We use these terms interchangeably throughout, so what do we mean by them? The most straightforward, if somewhat narrow, answer is that this kind of resilience is being able to bounce back from setbacks and to stay effective in the face of tough demands and difficult circumstances. Expanding on this, our definition goes beyond recovery from stressful or potentially stressful events, to include the sustainability of that recovery and the lasting benefit—the strength that builds through coping well with such situations.1 The capability that is developed in this way applies to coping with everyday problems and challenges—the need for individual resilience is by no means restricted to extreme circumstances or heroic acts.
Cary L. Cooper, Jill Flint-Taylor, Michael Pearn

Understanding Resilience

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. “The Individual”—A Framework for Understanding Personal Resilience

Abstract
To understand individual differences in resilience, we need to move beyond the working definition set out in the Introduction, and look at some of the other ways this complex concept has been defined and researched. Traditionally, resilience has been studied from the angle of providing therapeutic support for people who are experiencing difficulty in coping with crisis, bereavement, or life in general. In seeking to understand why some people cope better than others, much of this work has focused on the development of resilience in childhood and adolescence.
Cary L. Cooper, Jill Flint-Taylor, Michael Pearn

Chapter 2. “The Individual + The Situation”—Personal Resilience at Work

Abstract
In Chapter 1, we explored the individual side of the equation presented in Figure 2.1, and we summarized these resources by grouping them into four broad clusters: Confidence, Social Support, Adaptability and Purposefulness. This sets the foundation for individuals to evaluate the existing state of their personal resilience resources. We also provided an overview of some of the available measures of adult resilience, most of which tap into all four components to some extent. This brings us to a more detailed exploration of the other side of the picture—the situation, and in particular the work context.
Cary L. Cooper, Jill Flint-Taylor, Michael Pearn

Chapter 3. Resilience-Building Over the Years—From Remedial to Performance-Enhancing

Abstract
Resilience development programs have appeared in various forms and contexts over the past twenty years, but despite consistently good results they have generally failed to take root and spread. Now, however, there are strong signs that this could change. Demand for resilience training (or “resiliency training”) is higher than ever before. It seems that the value of personal development in general is now more widely accepted beyond the human resources and learning and development communities. It is also clear that economic and social pressures are having a major impact on the world of work. This has certainly been the case before, but today there is greater consensus that these pressures will continue to grow unrelentingly in future.
Cary L. Cooper, Jill Flint-Taylor, Michael Pearn

Building Resilience

Frontmatter

Chapter 4. What Individuals Can Do to Build Their Resilience

Abstract
There is much that people managers and organizations can do to support and sustain individual resilience, as we shall see in later chapters. Ultimately, however, every person has a unique pattern of resilience that they have built up over the years, and that they bring with them into all situations, including work. Building resilience is, therefore, primarily an individual endeavor for which everyone needs to take personal responsibility. Those who succeed in raising their resilience to the next level will experience enduring benefits in all aspects of their lives.
Cary L. Cooper, Jill Flint-Taylor, Michael Pearn

Chapter 5. What Individuals can do: Strengthening the Four Personal Resilience Resources

Abstract
The relevance of the two broad approaches (the cognitive approach and increasing positive emotions) that we described in the previous chapter will be briefly highlighted at appropriate points during the following discussion on developing the four components of resilience (the personal resilience resources), but we will not repeat the detailed accounts already provided. It should also be pointed out that, as implied by the overlapping circles in Figure 5.1, the specific techniques we discuss below may apply to more than one of the four components.
Cary L. Cooper, Jill Flint-Taylor, Michael Pearn

Chapter 6. Organizational Approaches: The Individual at Work

Abstract
In this chapter and the next, we describe and discuss approaches to building resilience in the workplace. We believe the most effective approach is for organizations to incorporate resilience-building within an overall well-being or other change management strategy, and here we discuss the two main components of such a strategy, (i) resiliencefocused training and development for individuals and (ii) good management practices and organizational strategies that help to build resilience on a wider level. In earlier chapters we commented on the impact of the constantly accelerating rate of technological change that affects both our work lives and our personal lives. Combined with everincreasing pressures to perform, the need for high levels of resilience in the workforce has never been greater, if we are to ensure sustained health and success for individuals and the organizations they work in.
Cary L. Cooper, Jill Flint-Taylor, Michael Pearn

Chapter 7. Organizational Interventions: The Workplace Situation

Abstract
Managing the sources of workplace pressure and support effectively, means balancing challenge pressure with support to create high levels of well-being, and taking action to fill the “well-being reservoir” so that individuals and teams are in a better position to cope with the pressures they face at the time. There is also no doubt that sustained good management of these factors— Resources & Communication, Work Relationships, Control etc.—has the potential to improve the resilience of individuals for the long-term e.g. by providing stretching goals backed up with appropriate levels of support.
Cary L. Cooper, Jill Flint-Taylor, Michael Pearn

The Future of Resilience and its Role in Achieving Wider Organizational Objectives

Frontmatter

Chapter 8. Resilience-Building: Implications for Employers

Abstract
In this chapter we provide an overview of resilience-building that emerges from the discussion in earlier chapters. We go on to pull together the practical implications by sketching out eight scenarios for using or building individual resilience in the workplace.
Cary L. Cooper, Jill Flint-Taylor, Michael Pearn

Backmatter

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