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Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Introduction

Abstract
PEOPLE SAY THAT WRITING A BOOK IS LIKE HAVING A CHILD. SO IT’S FITTING that this book started with an ultrasound.
Matt Carmichael

One. The Changing Middle Class

How the Income Gap Is Polarizing Markets and Marketers
Abstract
WHEN YOU HEAR THE WORDS “MIDDLE CLASS,” IT’S HARD NOT TO START picturing some idealized 1950s version of this scene: A blonde apronwearing mom looks out the kitchen window of her ranch home at the yard where her adorable son and even more adorable daughter are playing. The neighborhood is safe. There might be an American-made Radio Flyer wagon in evidence. They live on a cul-de-sac. Dad’s at work, and Mom is making meatloaf for dinner. She has a range oven and a counter full of new labor-saving devices. In your mind, this scene plays out in black and white, and that doesn’t even strike you as odd.
Matt Carmichael

Two. How the Other 18 Percent Live

Post-recession Realities for the Affluent and Luxury Marketers
Abstract
LOGIC WOULD DICTATE THAT IF YOU HAVE A PRODUCT TO SELL, PITCHING IT to people who can afford it would be a good place to start. Thus the concept of “mass affluence” has become appealing to marketers in recent years. Simply put, in the growth period leading up to the recession, a growing upper middle class seemed to be forming with people both aspiring to luxury living and actually achieving it. Marketers and researchers dubbed them the “mass affluent.” It was an easy concept to believe in because who wouldn’t want to think that more and more people were prospering (or wanted to appear as though they were) and would then spend more and more on nicer and nicer things?
Matt Carmichael

Three. Home Economics

How Changes in Homes and Who Lives in Them Impact How We Spend
Abstract
CHRIS IS A DIVORCED FATHER WITH CUSTODY OF HIS TEENAGE DAUGHTER on weekends. Sandra is a single mom with two daughters—one in college and one in kindergarten. Liz is a single woman who plans to move in with her boyfriend when their respective leases run out. Andrew lived with his girlfriend before proposing. Michael lives with his boyfriend and a roommate. Basha and her husband are empty nesters. Jay lives with a roommate who is a friend from high school. These people range in age from their early twenties to their seventies. Each of them could be considered a “typical” American household these days. Yet you’d be surprised at how many people—marketers included—still think that married couples with kids are the norm.
Matt Carmichael

Four. The Buyographics of Family

Can Advertising Catch Up to Changing Gender Roles in the Home?
Abstract
THE TRADITIONAL ROLE OF “DAD” IS THAT OF THE PROVIDER. HE’S THE GUY who makes sure the money is earned, the bills are paid, and the family’s future is secure. Dale fits that model pretty well—what could be more representative of traditional American dads than a third-going-on-fourth-generation family farmer?
Matt Carmichael

Five. The Majority Myth

How Multicultural Marketing Fares as the Nation Becomes Truly Diverse
Abstract
IT’S NOT FAR-FETCHED TO IMAGINE ANDREW AS THE FIRST HISPANIC PRESIDENT. As a Millennial in his mid-twenties he has won elected office and is very involved in politics in Hampden County, Massachusetts.1 He’s already dreaming of the statehouse in Boston, a goal that a new fellowship at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology could help propel. “I love walking around the statehouse,” he said. “I would like to lead large amounts of people. Maybe not 365 million, but start with 40,000 or 50,000 and go from there.”
Matt Carmichael

Six. The Buyographics of City Living

How Product Design, Messaging, and Shopping Itself Change as We Become Increasingly Urbanized
Abstract
MICHAEL AND I ARE STANDING IN HIS SMALL MANHATTAN KITCHEN LOOKING through his window, which faces south over Central Park. Skyscrapers loom on the other side of the expansive green space. Michael is in his early thirties, right on the Gen-X/Millennial cusp. He lives in Harlem and exemplifies a number of trends in today’s urban living. He is part of a growing black professional class. His income would make him affluent in most parts of the world, but not so much here. So he and his Hispanic partner also have a third roommate in their apartment. He keeps a lot of his expenses low and therefore has enough discretionary income for entertaining, dining out, and other social activities.
Matt Carmichael

Seven. The Buyographics of Aging

How Boomers’ Transition to Seniors Will Define the Economy
Abstract
BASHA AND HER HUSBAND ARE GETTING OLDER. YOU MIGHT NOT GUESS that by listening to their daily activity log. They still work—she at a department store and he at a major sports complex—they are active in their community, and he teaches his neighbors how to play tennis.
Matt Carmichael

Eight. The Buyographics of Health Care

How We Re-prioritize as This Sector Takes Up More of Our Time and Money
Abstract
ALFREDO LIVES WITH HIS WIFE AND TWO CHILDREN IN AN APARTMENT COMPLEX in Los Angeles County. His household isn’t, strictly speaking, multigenerational, but his mother lives in the next unit over. She has health conditions that require around-the-clock care. Alfredo’s wife is paid by the state to care for her part-time, and they have a nurse who also stays with her. Alfredo, who works in logistics, chips in what he can for her care, and his sister winds up paying for most of it. His sister also splits time on weekends staying with her.
Matt Carmichael

Nine. The Connected Consumer

How Screens Are Changing the Targeting Game
Abstract
MICHAEL IS THE EPITOME OF A YOUNG URBAN PROFESSIONAL. HE GREW UP outside Cleveland but he got his MBA in France and spent a year working in Jordan. While there, he learned how to use media in a multitude of ways, from information gathering to working to serving as his primary source of entertainment. A friend at school showed him some areas of the Internet that tend to be a little loose with their concepts of intellectual property. By the time he got back to the U.S., he knew how to access content for almost everything, from recently released movies to cable programming.
Matt Carmichael

Ten. The Car Culture Crash

How Cars Fit into Millennial Lives
Abstract
JAY GREW UP POOR. THE REAL KIND OF POOR, WHERE YOU CAN ONLY AFFORD to pay one bill each month so you choose whether to risk getting the water or the electricity cut off. His family didn’t have cable. They didn’t have a phone.
Matt Carmichael

Epilogue

Demographics, Data, and Democracy
Abstract
WHEN A HIGH-PROFILE PRODUCT LAUNCH FAILS, BUSINESS REPORTERS AND pundits are quick to offer opinions on what went wrong. Blame gets assigned to the marketing, to the product development, to the packaging itself. All of this happens from the outside. The marketer itself might order an internal audit or postmortem of what failed and how it can be fixed next time around.
Matt Carmichael

Backmatter

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