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Über dieses Buch

The asymptotic limit theorems of control and information theories make it possible to explore the dynamics of collapse likely to afflict large-scale systems of autonomous ground vehicles that communicate with each other and with an embedding intelligent roadway. Any vehicle/road system is inherently unstable in the control theory sense as a consequence of the basic irregularities of the traffic stream, the road network, and their interactions, placing it in the realm of the Data Rate Theorem that mandates a minimum necessary rate of control information for stability. It appears that large-scale V2V/V2I systems will experience correspondingly large-scale failures analogous to the vast, propagating fronts of power network blackouts, and possibly less benign but more subtle patterns of individual vehicle, platoon, and mesoscale dysfunction. The central matter is the synergism between poorly-understood traffic flow dynamics and similarly cryptic multisource information network dynamics, leading to highly punctuated phase transition analogs.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. Central Problems

Abstract
Current marketing hype surrounding autonomous vehicles runs something like this: “Since more than 90% of highway deaths are related to driver error, automating out the driver will reduce loss of life by more than 90%”.
Rodrick Wallace

Chapter 2. Dynamics of Service Collapse

Abstract
To reiterate a central point, unlike aircraft, that can be constructed to be inherently stable in linear flight by placing the aerodynamic center of pressure sufficiently behind the mechanical center of gravity, the complex nature of road geometry and the local dynamics of vehicular traffic ensure that V2V/V2I systems will be inherently unstable, requiring constant input of control information to prevent crashes, traffic jams, and other tie-ups.
Rodrick Wallace

Chapter 3. The ‘Macroscopic Fundamental Diagram’

Abstract
A long line of work summarized by Cassidy et al. (2011) attempts to extend the idea of a fundamental diagram for a single road to a full transport network.
Rodrick Wallace

Chapter 4. Conclusions

Abstract
Ruelle (1983), in his elegant keynote address on turbulent dynamics, raises a red flag for any traffic flow studies.
Rodrick Wallace

Chapter 5. Mathematical Appendix

Abstract
The RDT asks how much a signal can be compressed and have average distortion, according to an appropriate measure, less than some predetermined limit D.
Rodrick Wallace

Chapter 6. References

Abstract
Amoozadeh M, Raghuramu A, Dhuah C, Ghosal D, Xhang HMZ, Rowe J, Levitt K (2015) Security vulnerabilites of connected vehicle streams and their impact on cooperative driving. IEEE Commun Mag 53:126–132.
Rodrick Wallace
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