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Über dieses Buch

Microtechnologies and their corresponding CAD tools have meanwhile reached alevel of sophistication that requires the application of theoretical means on all modelling levels of design and analysis. Also, there is a growing need for a scientific approach in modelling again. Many concepts provided by Systems Theory again turn out to be of major importance. This is especially valid for the design of "machines with intelligent behaviour". When dealing with complex systems, the engineering design has to be supported by CAD tools. Consequently, the methods of Systems Theory must also get computerized. The newly established field of "Computer Aided Systems Theory" (CAST) is a first effort in this direction. The goal of CAST research and development isto provide "Systems Theory Method Banks" which can be used in education and to provide a platform for the migration of CAST methods into existing CAD tools. This book, basing on different research and development projects in CAST, is written for engineers who are interested in using and developing CAST systems, particularly in thefield of Information and Systems Engineering.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

1. Introduction

Abstract
Problems arise contextually in connection with open answers to questions concerning a given reality. A reality can already exist or be planned to exist. Existing realities are typical for problems of science, planned realities are the main objects in engineering.
Franz Pichler, Heinz Schwärtzel

2. CAST Method Bank Systems

Abstract
In Chapter 1 we introduced the reader to the world of the “systems approach” for modelling purposes from a general point of view. The concept of system types, specific examples, and the concept of system transformations and their linking to form a system algorithm were the main objects of concern. In the following, we will introduce the concepts and computer-aided means that make Systems Theory operational for practical applications. The concept of a “method bank”, a special kind of database system which enables the user to apply the knowledge of Systems Theory, is put forward.
Franz Pichler, Heinz Schwärtzel

3. Modelling and Simulation

Abstract
Reviewing the model-based approach to scientific problem solving from a very general point of view, we observe the following pattern of actions (Figure 3.1.1): Starting with the real world situation, we recognize a problem we want to eliminate or improve. To tackle this problem using scientific methods we first build a model,and try to find a solution of the problem in the world of the model. The obtained solution in the model world has to be interpreted in the real world and finally we have to implement the solution in the real world to eliminate the problem.
Franz Pichler, Heinz Schwärtzel

4. Machine Vision

Abstract
The goal of machine vision, in very general terms, is the construction of artificial mechanisms that are capable of “seeing” similar to the visual systems found in many natural creatures. There are two major motivations for pursuing work in this direction. First, there exist numerous practical applications for an artificial vision technology, e.g., in the areas of robotics, space exploration, remote sensing, security, surveillance systems, and many others. Secondly, it is a widely held view that research in machine vision may eventually provide us with a deeper understanding of biological vision systems, the human visual system in particular.
Franz Pichler, Heinz Schwärtzel

5. Implementation Issues

Abstract
For the realization of CAST systems, the classical top-down software development cycle has proved to be inadequate. An inherent feature of all our CAST projects has been that no full requirement specification ever existed. Instead, specifications were developed incrementally while projects were in progress. In many cases, the developer only has a (vague) idea what the system is meant to do and how a solution could look like. Frequently, only an implementation can show the feasibility of the original idea and the viability of the proposed solution. Many problems, e.g., complexity issues, only will ever be tackled when a running prototype is available. Moreover, the actual implementation brings up new ideas for improvements and extensions.
Franz Pichler, Heinz Schwärtzel

Backmatter

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