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Leontin Karl Grafmüller explores how companies can better manage co-creation in the B2B high-tech domain. Co-creation is an active, creative and social collaboration process between customers and providers, in which customers become active participants in innovation processes of a firm to jointly develop new products. The co-creation of high-tech products poses several challenges related to high product complexity such as the time intensity or incorrect specifications. The author investigates this topic from different angles and showcases how the challenges involved are faced to enhance both the efficiency and efficacy of the co-creation of high-tech products in the B2B domain.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Part I – Introduction

Abstract
Creating and designing products together with customers is not a new phenomenon in innovation research. Already in the early 1970s, researchers such as Nigel Cross have called for major rethinking and more customer integration in product design processes. Formerly discussed as participatory design (Cross, 1972), it has gained heavy interest almost half a century later in both innovation research and practice referred to as customer co-creation (Gemser & Perks, 2015; Mustak, Jaakkola, & Halinen, 2013; Piller, Ihl, & Vossen, 2010; Prahalad & Ramaswamy, 2004a).
Leontin Karl Grafmüller

Part II – Unmasking promising practices for co-creation in the high-tech domain

Abstract
Part I introduced the relevance, state of the art in extant literature and also set the context of the research for this dissertation. It becomes evident that there is a need to better understand co-creation processes in the B2B domain. With that aim, this part picks up the first research gap (see Chapter 2 of Part I) and unveils promising practices of how providers manage and involve business customers into the co-creation of hightech products.
Leontin Karl Grafmüller

Part III – Exploring business customers’ value in co-creation

Abstract
After analyzing the provider’s perspective in Part II, this part is dedicated to the customers’ domain. Thereby, the studies on the dyadic co-creation process are complemented by the customers’ view. Part III picks up the second research gap and examines the customer value of the co-creation process (see Part I; 2.4 Research gaps and needs ).
Leontin Karl Grafmüller

Part IV – Designing a toolkit for the co-creation of high-tech products

Abstract
Part IV picks up the third research gap (see Chapter 2 of Part I) and points out opportunities for the usage of toolkits in the context of high-tech product co-creation. It builds an artefact for a real-life setting, using design science research (DSR), and includes both the provider and customer perspective. Part IV is embedded in the dissertation as illustrated in Figure 16.
Leontin Karl Grafmüller

Part V – Summary and implications

Abstract
This dissertation examines the co-creation of high-tech products in the B2B domain. In the era of open innovation, this research targets a topic of both practical and academic relevance. The overall objective of this dissertation is a better understanding of the phenomenon which appears reasonable as extant literature on the topic is rather scarce.
Leontin Karl Grafmüller

Backmatter

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