Skip to main content
main-content

Über dieses Buch

This second edition is an intensively revised and updated version of the book MATLAB® and Design Recipes for Earth Sciences. It aims to introduce students to the typical course followed by a data analysis project in earth sciences. A project usually involves searching relevant literature, reviewing and ranking published books and journal articles, extracting relevant information from the literature in the form of text, data, or graphs, searching and processing the relevant original data using MATLAB, and compiling and presenting the results as posters, abstracts, and oral presentations using graphics design software. The text of this book includes numerous examples on the use of internet resources, on the visualization of data with MATLAB, and on preparing scientific presentations. As with the book MATLAB Recipes for Earth Sciences–4rd Edition (2015), which demonstrates the use of statistical and numerical methods on earth science data, this book uses state-of-the art software packages, including MATLAB and the Adobe Creative Suite, to process and present geoscientific information collected during the course of an earth science project. The book's supplementary electronic material (available online through the publisher's website) includes color versions of all figures, recipes with all the MATLAB commands featured in the book, the example data, exported MATLAB graphics, and screenshots of the most important steps involved in processing the graphics.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. Scientific Information in Earth Sciences

This book is based on an undergraduate course taught at the University of Potsdam in Germany (http://​uni-potsdam.​de), as was also the case with its sister book MATLAB Recipes for Earth Sciences4rd Edition (Trauth 2015).
Martin H. Trauth, Elisabeth Sillmann

Chapter 2. Searching and Reviewing Scientific Literature

This chapter is on searching relevant literature, reviewing and ranking published books and journal articles, and extracting relevant information in the form of text, data, or graphs.
Martin H. Trauth, Elisabeth Sillmann

Chapter 3. Internet Resources for Earth Science Data

This chapter deals with electronic data resources, searching for specific data, transferring data between servers and computers
Martin H. Trauth, Elisabeth Sillmann

Chapter 4. MATLAB as a Visualization Tool

MATLAB® is a software package developed by The MathWorks, Inc., founded by Cleve Moler, Jack Little and Steve Bangert in 1984, which has its headquarters in Natick, Massachusetts (http://​www.​mathworks.​com).
Martin H. Trauth, Elisabeth Sillmann

Chapter 5. Visualizing 2D Data in Earth Sciences

In this chapter we demonstrate advanced two-dimensional visualization techniques in the form of graphical displays of the types of data typically encountered in earth sciences, using MATLAB.
Martin H. Trauth, Elisabeth Sillmann

Chapter 6. Visualizing 3D Data in Earth Sciences

Most data in earth sciences are spatially distributed, either as vector data, (points, lines, polygons) or as raster data (gridded topography). Vector data are generated by digitizing map objects such as drainage networks or outlines of lithologic units. Raster data can be obtained directly from a satellite sensor output, but gridded data can also, in most cases, be interpolated from irregularly-distributed field samples (gridding).
Martin H. Trauth, Elisabeth Sillmann

Chapter 7. Processing and Displaying Images in Earth Sciences

Computer graphics are stored and processed as either vector or raster data. Most of the data types that were encountered in the previous chapter were vector data, i.e., points, lines and polygons. Drainage networks, the outlines of geologic units, sampling locations, and topographic contours are all examples of vector data. In this chapter, coastlines are stored in a vector format while bathymetric and topographic data are saved in a raster format. Vector and raster data are often combined in a single data set, for instance to display the course of a river on a satellite image. Raster data are often converted to vector data by digitizing points, lines or polygons. Conversely, vector data are sometimes transformed to raster data.
Martin H. Trauth, Elisabeth Sillmann

Chapter 8. Editing Graphics, Text, and Tables

In Chaps. 2 and 3 we extracted text and tables from journal articles, webpages, and online data bases. In Chaps. 5 and 6 we then created various simple line graphs, bar plots, and block diagrams with MATLAB.
Martin H. Trauth, Elisabeth Sillmann

Chapter 9. Creating Conference Presentations

The results of a project are typically presented in three formats: posters, talks, and papers. A poster is collection of graphics, photos, and text printed on a large sheet of paper that is presented on a poster-board in a large hall in a conference building.
Martin H. Trauth, Elisabeth Sillmann

Chapter 10. Creating Conference Posters

The results of a project are typically presented in three formats; as posters, talks, and papers. A poster is collection of figures, photos, and text printed on a large sheet of paper that is presented on a poster-board in a large hall in a conference building. During poster sessions the presenter of the poster can interact personally with the people attending the poster session and visiting the poster. This section is on planning and designing a poster, and also includes suggestions for practicing the presentation of a poster at a conference.
Martin H. Trauth, Elisabeth Sillmann

Chapter 11. Creating Manuscripts, Flyers, and Brochures

Oral and poster presentations are typically held at conferences or workshops, with a limited number of attendees. Making posters and presentations available online, as either PDF files or videos, increases the potential size of the audience. The most effective way to present scientific information is, however, to publish it as a journal article, thesis, or book. In contrast to these multipage formats, flyers and brochures are used to provide scientific information in a highly condensed form and are typically distributed as handouts at conferences, from trade show booths, during roadshows, or at public presentations.
Martin H. Trauth, Elisabeth Sillmann

Chapter 12. Creating Multimedia Publications

Many scientific publications now include multimedia material, either as an electronic supplement or embedded within publication files; chapter deals mainly with such embedded material. Multimedia objects can be integrated into web pages since a very long time. The HyperText Markup Language (HTML), developed in 1990 by Tim Berners-Lee at CERN and now available as HTML5, the fifth version of the HTML standard, was designed to allow authors to provide not only text, images and interactive forms, but also audio and video, within a single (web)page.
Martin H. Trauth, Elisabeth Sillmann
Weitere Informationen

BranchenIndex Online

Die B2B-Firmensuche für Industrie und Wirtschaft: Kostenfrei in Firmenprofilen nach Lieferanten, Herstellern, Dienstleistern und Händlern recherchieren.

Whitepaper

- ANZEIGE -

Globales Erdungssystem in urbanen Kabelnetzen

Bedingt durch die Altersstruktur vieler Kabelverteilnetze mit der damit verbundenen verminderten Isolationsfestigkeit oder durch fortschreitenden Kabelausbau ist es immer häufiger erforderlich, anstelle der Resonanz-Sternpunktserdung alternative Konzepte für die Sternpunktsbehandlung umzusetzen. Die damit verbundenen Fehlerortungskonzepte bzw. die Erhöhung der Restströme im Erdschlussfall führen jedoch aufgrund der hohen Fehlerströme zu neuen Anforderungen an die Erdungs- und Fehlerstromrückleitungs-Systeme. Lesen Sie hier über die Auswirkung von leitfähigen Strukturen auf die Stromaufteilung sowie die Potentialverhältnisse in urbanen Kabelnetzen bei stromstarken Erdschlüssen. Jetzt gratis downloaden!

Bildnachweise