Skip to main content
main-content

Tipp

Weitere Artikel dieser Ausgabe durch Wischen aufrufen

01.04.2013 | Original Paper | Ausgabe 1/2013

Tribology Letters 1/2013

Contact Mechanics and Friction on Dry and Wet Human Skin

Zeitschrift:
Tribology Letters > Ausgabe 1/2013
Autoren:
B. N. J. Persson, A. Kovalev, S. N. Gorb

Abstract

The surface topography of the human wrist skin is studied using an optical method and the surface roughness power spectrum is obtained. The Persson contact mechanics theory is used to calculate the contact area for different magnifications, for both dry and wet condition of the skin. For dry skin, plastic yielding becomes important and will determine the area of contact observed at the highest magnification. The measured friction coefficient [M.J. Adams et al., Tribol Lett 26:239, 2007] on both dry and wet skin can be explained assuming that a frictional shear stress σf ≈ 15 MPa acts in the area of real contact during sliding. This frictional shear stress is typical for sliding on polymer surfaces, and for thin (nanometer) confined fluid films. The big increase in the friction, which has been observed for glass sliding on wet skin as the skin dries up, can be explained as resulting from the increase in the contact area arising from the attraction of capillary bridges. This effect is predicted to operate as long as the water layer is thinner than ∼14 μm, which is in good agreement with the time period (of order 100 s) over which the enhanced friction is observed (it takes about 100 s for ∼14 μm water to evaporate at 50% relative humidity and at room temperature). We calculate the dependency of the sliding friction coefficient on the sliding speed on lubricated surfaces (Stribeck curve). We show that sliding of a sphere and of a cylinder gives very similar results if the radius and load on the sphere and cylinder are appropriately related. When applied to skin the calculated Stribeck curve is in good agreement with experiment, except that the curve is shifted by one velocity-decade to higher velocities than observed experimentally. We explain this by the role of the skin and underlying tissues viscoelasticity on the contact mechanics.

Bitte loggen Sie sich ein, um Zugang zu diesem Inhalt zu erhalten

Sie möchten Zugang zu diesem Inhalt erhalten? Dann informieren Sie sich jetzt über unsere Produkte:

Springer Professional "Wirtschaft+Technik"

Online-Abonnement

Mit Springer Professional "Wirtschaft+Technik" erhalten Sie Zugriff auf:

  • über 69.000 Bücher
  • über 500 Zeitschriften

aus folgenden Fachgebieten:

  • Automobil + Motoren
  • Bauwesen + Immobilien
  • Business IT + Informatik
  • Elektrotechnik + Elektronik
  • Energie + Umwelt
  • Finance + Banking
  • Management + Führung
  • Marketing + Vertrieb
  • Maschinenbau + Werkstoffe
  • Versicherung + Risiko

Testen Sie jetzt 30 Tage kostenlos.

Springer Professional "Technik"

Online-Abonnement

Mit Springer Professional "Technik" erhalten Sie Zugriff auf:

  • über 50.000 Bücher
  • über 380 Zeitschriften

aus folgenden Fachgebieten:

  • Automobil + Motoren
  • Bauwesen + Immobilien
  • Business IT + Informatik
  • Elektrotechnik + Elektronik
  • Energie + Umwelt
  • Maschinenbau + Werkstoffe




Testen Sie jetzt 30 Tage kostenlos.

Literatur
Über diesen Artikel

Weitere Artikel der Ausgabe 1/2013

Tribology Letters 1/2013 Zur Ausgabe

Premium Partner

    Marktübersichten

    Die im Laufe eines Jahres in der „adhäsion“ veröffentlichten Marktübersichten helfen Anwendern verschiedenster Branchen, sich einen gezielten Überblick über Lieferantenangebote zu verschaffen. 

    Bildnachweise