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Über dieses Buch

The rise of the Internet and social media in particular offer great opportunities for brand owners to increase business and brand recognition. While this has clearly been of benefit to brand owners, who have seen a consequent rise in the value of their brands, it simultaneously makes those brands more attractive for exploitation or attack by others. Brand risks can come in many different types and this book provides examples of how these risks can arise as well as providing quantitative estimates of the adverse impacts that can result from such risks.

Brand owners need to be aware of the risks and of the need to develop strategies for identifying and managing them. This book details the process by which a brand owner can develop a brand risk management process to protect a brand’s reputation and value. Rather than prescribe a one-size-fits-all approach, the authors provide guidance on how a brand risk management process can be tailored to particular needs and circumstances.

This approach is underpinned by drawing on examples of best practice in the fields of risk management, interaction design and engineering design. This combined approach relies on developing an understanding of the risks faced by a particular brand owner, the full context of those risks and also the brand owner’s capabilities for identifying and managing those risks.

This book contains many real-world examples and interviews with a number of brand owning organisations ranging from small companies to large multinationals.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. An Introduction to Brand Risk

In this introductory chapter, we explore the nature of brand risks and discuss the motivation behind the writing of this book. The rise of the internet and social media offer great opportunities for brand owners to increase business and brand recognition. However, they also offer opportunities for less scrupulous people to take advantage of those brands whether for personal gain, illicit purposes or simply out of malice. Brand owners need to be aware of such risks and of the need to develop strategies for identifying and managing them. This chapter provides examples where companies and celebrities have been targeted by cybersquatters. It further then provides a set of definitions through which an understanding of the risks can be developed. Finally, this chapter details the process by which a brand owner can develop a brand risk management process to protect a brand’s reputation and value. The development of that process is then explored in the rest of the book.
Christopher Hofman, Simeon Keates

Chapter 2. An Overview of Branding and its Associated Risks

This chapter examines what a brand is and how much a brand is worth for a company. A definition of what makes a brand is provided, along with examples of how brand value can be increased. The value of brands has increased substantially with the rise of mass media and globalisation. While this has clearly been of benefit to brand owners, who have seen a consequent rise in the value of their brands, it simultaneously makes those brands more attractive for exploitation by others. Brand risks can come in many different types and this chapter presents 15 such types of risk. It provides examples of how these risks can arise and provides quantitative estimates of the adverse impacts that can result from such risks.
Christopher Hofman, Simeon Keates

Chapter 3. Brand Risk Management Theory

This chapter introduces a number of approaches to quantifying and communicating the nature of brand risks through, for example, the use of models and risk maps. Furthermore, it discusses a number of generic brand defence strategies that can be employed. This chapter then provides a description of typical brand risk management tools that are available commercially. However, while such tools and strategies are available, they are far from achieving ubiquity among brand owners. To understand why, this chapter presents the results of interviews with six brand owners from companies and organisations that range from small, specialist manufacturers to large multinationals. These interviews explore their perceptions of the scale of the brand risks they face, their typical methods for identifying brand risks and then their approaches to remedying any risks that have been identified. In all cases, there were no systematic methods of brand risk identification in place. Furthermore, the management strategies that were in place were often confused or weak. These interviews indicate the need for an effective brand risk management process which is straightforward to implement and maintain.
Christopher Hofman, Simeon Keates

Chapter 4. Designing a Brand Risk Management Process

Having looked at the nature of brand risk and the levels of awareness and ability to manage risk of a range of brand owners, it is clear that a new approach to brand risk management is required. It is unlikely that a one-size-fits-all approach is likely to work given the scale and variety of the nature of brand risks. Consequently, this chapter focuses on the process by which a brand owning organisation can develop its own custom brand risk management process. Rather than developing the process from traditional brand risk and business theory, a new approach was taken, that of applying the principles of engineering design and interaction design to make a more user-friendly solution. This combined approach relies on developing an understanding of the risks faced by a particular brand owner, the full context of those risks and also the brand owner’s capabilities for identifying and managing those risks. Gaining this understanding is facilitated by mapping the risks and the available skills and then synthesising these into tools for designing a new process. An example of how this may be accomplished is the use of personas within defined context scenarios to tell particular brand risk stories. Using those stories, a more complete brand risk management process can be developed.
Christopher Hofman, Simeon Keates

Chapter 5. Brand Risks in Cyberspace

One of the difficulties in writing a book like this is knowing when to stop writing. Through the course of writing this one, we have been paying attention to the stream of stories in mainstream media arising from brandjacking, cybersquatting and an assorted collection of other dubious or suspect practices in cyberspace. The consequences of these examples are almost always financial or reputational damage, either for the brand owner or for the infringing party. This concluding chapter explores some of the more recent stories of brand risk in the news, to show how brand risks are here to stay and are continuously evolving as new technologies become available. The chapter finishes by reviewing the overall content of the book to summarise the important points we have discussed and explored.
Christopher Hofman, Simeon Keates

Backmatter

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