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This book explores the cultural policies of sub-states with strong nationalist inclinations–in particular, Québec, Scotland, and Catalonia–and their trend, in recent years, towards promoting and supporting the cultural industries as a means of not just preserving their respective cultural identities, but of growing them. This represents a paradigm shift from the traditional discourse around cultural policy, which often posits that concepts of identity fall under the purview of heritage institutions and organizations, not that of industries. Drawing on the work of Boltanski and Thévenot—notably, their economies of worth framework—this book develops a typological analysis of cultural policy. Specifically, this book seeks to fill a gap in the cultural policy and cultural studies literature where identity and the cultural industries are concerned, expanding on the role of the cultural industries in the development of identity and the implications it has for cultural policy.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. Introduction: Problematizing Culture in a Global Era

Abstract
The introduction chapter sets the stage for the rest of the volume. The book asks the following questions: What sets the cultural policies of sub-states apart from their majority counterparts? Do their cultural policies (and culturally significant policies) evidence a certain form, structure, or approach that helps distinguish them from the approaches of other (often majoritarian) cultures? With these questions in mind, the introduction briefly outlines the intent and purpose of the book and introduces the rationale for exploring these questions through the cases of Québec, Scotland, and Catalonia. This chapter also discusses the book’s application of Boltanski and Thévenot’s economies of worth framework.
Devin Beauregard

Chapter 2. The Evolving Nature of Cultural Policy

Abstract
This chapter provides an overview and assessment of cultural policy and its changing nature in recent decades. This chapter also provides an account of the current trends in cultural policy discourse, outlining the field’s major developments, themes, and debates. The purpose of this chapter is to provide readers with a general overview of the field of cultural policy studies—where it has been and where it is going—as a means of familiarizing them with the field’s key concepts and ideas, including cultural democracy, the democratization of culture, and the instrumentalization of culture. This chapter also introduces the concepts of the cultural industries, identity, nationalism, and national identity.
Devin Beauregard

Chapter 3. The Cultural Industries Turn in Cultural Policy

Abstract
This chapter will delve into the emergence and significance of cultural industries discourse in cultural policy. This chapter will discuss the concept of the cultural industries, in depth, and explore its significance in terms of cultural policy and industry. This chapter will also engage with the concept of globalization and its relevance to the emergence and growth of the cultural industries as agents for culture and identity dissemination.
Devin Beauregard

Chapter 4. Cultural Industries in Québec

Abstract
This chapter is the first of the three cases studied in this book. This chapter presents a brief history and overview of some of Québec’s cultural policies, before expanding on its major cultural policy developments since the early 1990s. This chapter will chart a trend in Québec’s cultural policies—away from cultural preservation, toward cultural growth and expansion.
Devin Beauregard

Chapter 5. Culture, Politics, and Identity in Scotland

Abstract
This chapter charts the development of cultural policy in Scotland, primarily post-1997 devolution. It is only in the post-devolution era, in fact, that Scotland has truly developed a comprehensive cultural policy—one that actually recognizes and seeks to promote Scottish culture as something distinct and unique to its country. This chapter will also explore the active role of the cultural industries in Scotland’s cultural production and dissemination and the emphasis its government places on those industries through its policies.
Devin Beauregard

Chapter 6. Cultural Distinction and Identity in Catalonia

Abstract
This chapter explores the re-emergence of Catalan culture following years of repression during the Franco dictatorship. Of note in this re-emergence is the emphasis Catalan’s governments conferred to the cultural industries—in particular, the multimedia sector—as a vehicle for cultural (and industrial) growth and sustainability, as well as a consideration of the current and future socio-political climate of the sub-state.
Devin Beauregard

Chapter 7. A Typology of Sub-State Cultural Policy: Québec, Scotland, and Catalonia

Abstract
This chapter explores the ways in which identity and identity issues have been recognized, problematized, and mobilized in the development of sub-state cultural policy. From this exploration, a common world, in the image of Boltanski and Thévenot’s (1991) economies of worth framework, of sub-state cultural policy begins to take shape. Specifically, this chapter explores the key cultural policies of Québec, Scotland, and Catalonia, respectively, in relation to the 13 analytical categories of the economies of worth framework outlined in Chap. 1 and presents a common world of its own: The World of National Minority Cultural Policy.
Devin Beauregard

Chapter 8. Conclusion: Toward a Common World of National Minority Cultural Policy

Abstract
The final chapter brings the book’s findings together to establish a new common world: the common world of national minority cultural policy. Through this common world, this chapter discusses the implications of the cultural industries turn in cultural policy—particularly where sub-states are concerned. In particular, this chapter discusses the significance of the cultural industries’ role in the development of identity and the implications this has on cultural policy—both in the context of sub-states and in the context of globalization. This chapter offers speculation on what this turn in cultural policy means for culture and identity moving forward and how the new common world can be applied for future research.
Devin Beauregard

Backmatter

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