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Über dieses Buch

This study is based on the authors' fieldwork inside Cultural Enterprise Office, a small Scottish agency that supports creative businesses. It discusses UK policy on the creative economy, the rise of intermediaries between policy-making and the marketplace, and the playing out in the delivery of business advice services to creative microbusinesses.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

1. Researching Cultural Enterprise Office

Abstract
Vus chapter introduces Cultural Enterprise Office (CEO), the book’s object of study. Based in Glasgow, CEO is situated in the wider UK ‘creative economy’ policy framework and its Scottish variant. Studies of intermediaries engaged in cultural business support for ‘creatives1 are rare. How their performance is formed by the wider institutional landscape and shifting ideas and practices has been little examined. Our research has itself been shaped by the current vogue for knowledge exchange between academics and those they research.
Philip Schlesinger, Melanie Selfe, Ealasaid Munro

2. Nation, State and Creative Economy

Abstract
This chapter shows how the ‘creative economy’ became a central plank of UK cultural policy, from the New Labour government (1997–2010) to the Con-Lib Dem coalition government (2010–2015). Both the globalisation of this discourse and its localisation in Scotland are described. The centrality of the creative economy for Scottish cultural policy under both the Lab-Lib coalitions (1999–2007) and the Scottish National Party (2007 to date) is analysed, with particular attention paid to the common political ground regarding the present institutional landscape. Cultural Enterprise Office is situated in the context of a discussion of current analyses of cultural intermediaries and of cultural entrepreneurship.
Philip Schlesinger, Melanie Selfe, Ealasaid Munro

3. Origins and Development of CEO

Abstract
Vus chapter outlines the evolution of Cultural Enterprise Office over is years, tracing its development from the initial feasibility study in 1999, through its launch and four phases of operation. The final section sets out the shape of the organisation and its main business support activities during the period of observation (2013 2014). The chapter addresses the role of institutional narrative; CEO’s changing geographic remit; the way the organisation has drawn on and modified operational models from elsewhere; how it has intersected with and adapted itself to the existing local and national business support infrastructure. It concludes that the quest for survival has required CEO to continually adapt, re- orientating itself towards different sources of funding and responding to current policy trends.
Philip Schlesinger, Melanie Selfe, Ealasaid Munro

4. Organisational Values and Practices of Support

Abstract
Vus chapter takes a closer look, at the business support practices of CEO, examining how the central ethos of the organisation is expressed through day-to-day client interactions and the language in which business advice is delivered and discussed. Il identifies three corevalues underpinning the delivery of advice and support to clients- being bespoke, being non-judgemental and taking a coaching centred approach to supporting clients and considers the ways in which staff use the idea of client journeys’ to conceptualise trajectories through CEO’s service and the business world. Finally, it addresses the impact of the introduction of structured programmes on organisational values, arguing that these have introduced new terms and different styles of interaction to the organisation, reshaping the idea of being bespoke’.
Philip Schlesinger, Melanie Selfe, Ealasaid Munro

5. Future-Proofing CEO?

Abstract
This chapter addresses CEO’s strategic development during 2013–2014, aided in part by targeted funding. In a bid to future-proof the organisation in an increasingly competitive business support landscape, CEO was restructured. It began to develop critical independent research, and sought to re imagine modeh of digital and physical service delivery. The bid for further Creative Scotland funding that would have enabled the more ambitious plans to be pursued was unsuccessful. This chapter explores the development of new goals when their realisation was still thought feasible, considers internal transformations observed in CEO as it attempted to prepare for this next phase, and reflects on the tension between serving and shaping the top-down policy agenda. The chapter contains a statement from the Director on her departure.
Philip Schlesinger, Melanie Selfe, Ealasaid Munro

6. Where Next for Cultural Business Support?

Abstract
This chapter concludes the hook. It argues that support for the creative economy now operates within a largely unchallenged set of assumptions. However, given that policy makers evidently think that bodies such as CEO are important for pursuing national goals, loo little attention has been paid to their precarious conditions of existence. Our study has shown that, irrespective of contemporary political change, Scottish creative economy policy has remained highly dependent on UK initiatives and ideas. Moreover, the cross border transfer of people and practices has also been important in establishing commonalities of approach. These, though, should not obscure the continuing importance, specificity and impact of place for the functioning of cultural business support, and not least the role of the local funding regime in shaping its periodically changing mission.
Philip Schlesinger, Melanie Selfe, Ealasaid Munro

Backmatter

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