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22.04.2017 | Original Paper | Ausgabe 9/2017

Biodiversity and Conservation 9/2017

Does the management of surrounding terrestrial habitats increase the tendency of odonates to leave aquatic habitats?

Zeitschrift:
Biodiversity and Conservation > Ausgabe 9/2017
Autor:
Filip Harabiš
Wichtige Hinweise
Communicated by Nigel E. Stork.

Electronic supplementary material

The online version of this article (doi:10.​1007/​s10531-017-1350-8) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

Abstract

Generally, dragonflies and damselflies (odonates) are considered aquatic invertebrates. However, the ecological requirements of their adults are not different from those of fully, terrestrial insects. Surprisingly, there is a very little information on whether the management and structure of surrounding habitats has any influence on the diversity and seasonal dynamics of odonates. This is important to know because recently, a large proportion of freshwater habitats in Central Europe have becomes surrounded by intensively managed habitats. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of different types of terrestrial habitats on their long-term utilization by dragonflies and damselflies. I assumed that this pattern varied over time; therefore, I used generalized additive mixed models to analyze the effects of management on seasonal changes in the abundance of individuals in terrestrial environments. From my results, it was evident that the management practices of surrounding terrestrial habitats had a significant impact on the population dynamics of dragonflies. The abundance of dragonfly adults in surrounding terrestrial habitats increased toward the end of the season. However, this was only, when the natal aquatic habitat was not affected by fish farming and was able to supply surrounding terrestrial habitats with offspring. This was evidenced by the fact that, compared to areas with extensive water management, in sites with fish farming, seasonal increases in abundance was negligible. There is no doubt that the structure of surrounding terrestrial habitats has a significant influence on the diversity of terrestrial invertebrates. However, we must not forget that terrestrial habitats, regardless of their management, are not able to replace the poor quality of the aquatic (natal) habitat. Interestingly, the abundance of damselflies decreased toward the end of the season, regardless of the management practices of the surrounding areas. This indicates that their dynamics is more controlled by time stress or other similar mechanisms than that of dragonflies.

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