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Über dieses Buch

It is increasingly apparent that capitalism cannot stave off the truly frightening ecological disasters that threaten the future of life on earth. Is it an accident that the strongest and most capitalist economic force in the world, the US, is also that force that is most prone to the denial of the enormous dangers of global warming? While capitalism is a global force, it is not supported by the majority of the world, and much more thought and action is needed to integrate and globalize movements against oppression, injustice and ecological destruction.
While changes at a local level are important and more feasible in our current world, ultimately changes at a global level may have greater long-term importance, and we need to greatly expand theorizations and mobilizations in this direction now. Robert Albritton proposes 'practical utopias' as a process of thinking by which short-term changes tend in the direction of desirable changes in the long term.


Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. Introduction: Rethinking Time and Space

Abstract
My central concern in this book is to demonstrate how hopelessly archaic capitalism has become in its attempts to deal with the multiplying and deepening crises that humanity faces. Indeed these are crises that for the most part have been caused by some combination of ecological change and capitalism. In this book I shall show how existing crises overlap and deepen one another.
Robert Albritton

Chapter 2. Hobbes and Locke: “Fear of Death, Poverty, or Other Calamity” (Hobbes, Leviathan, p. 88)

Abstract
By starting this chapter with a brief discussion of capitalist ethics, I do not mean to imply that capitalist ethics is more important as a causal force in history than capitalist economics. Rather, my purpose is to briefly weave the two together, because they seldom have been. In fact, Hobbes and Locke are often considered by political theorists to be two of the most influential founders of liberalism. Given that a few hundred years separate us, it is a surprise that we still use the term neo-liberalism and because of C. B. Macpherson, we still use “possessive individualism.”
Robert Albritton

Chapter 3. Marx’s Devastating Critique of Capitalism

Abstract
Marx’s Three Volumes of Capital is a masterpiece when it comes to understanding the deep structures of capitalism as well as the history of capitalism. I utilize three levels of analysis derived primarily from Japanese Political Economist Tom Sekine to understand the theory of capital’s deep structures (Marx often uses “pure” theory to refer to deep structures), a mid-range theory that aims to grasp various stages of capitalist development in terms of the predominant use-values that are subsumed to predominant values, and finally historical analysis that is informed by the two higher levels.
Robert Albritton

Chapter 4. Ethics and Education: Possessive Individualism Versus Global Caring

Abstract
A strong, enlightening, and ethical educational system is particularly crucial today because global warming, plus the coming struggles over crumbs as the world’s resources become used up and/or not very retrievable, may lead to war unless a very strong ethics/education helps us to settle disputes peacefully and open our hearts to otherness, and to global needs. Already we are seeing very mean and warlike attitudes develop towards immigrants most of whom face lives of extreme poverty and/or violence. Unfortunately, what we are currently seeing is anger being aroused and focused on immigrants.
Robert Albritton

Chapter 5. The Super Rich: Billions Versus Poverty

Abstract
Except for the very rich, and possibly even some of them, economies that are rapidly increasing the degrees of inequality are ones that are going the wrong way. Indeed, it is a political economic outcome that almost everyone would oppose. It is therefore likely that in the future there will be protests and uprisings that will take on increasingly global dimensions, uprisings that will increase until a much greater degree of equality becomes established worldwide and particularly in the dominant capitalist country, the United States.
Robert Albritton

Chapter 6. Ever Expanding Militarism

Abstract
Will the American Global Empire become one more Ancient Rome essentially collapsing from an over expansion that can no longer afford the costs of trying to be “great again?” Certainly, the extreme growth of American militarism, a militarism that it cannot afford in an age of ecological crises, suggests a grim future for the United States.
Robert Albritton

Chapter 7. Why So Many Guns and Prisons?

Abstract
One might think that returning American war veterans, having put their lives on the line, would receive special help finding a good job, a good place to live, and good health care. By and large this is not the case given the statistics on homelessness, divorce, mental illness and suicide, violent crime, and unemployment or precarious employment. It turns out that resettling is often difficult given the switch from military comradeship to the possessive individualism of American culture.
Robert Albritton

Chapter 8. Water and Land

Abstract
It is only too apparent that climate change is having a large negative impact on human life by worsening drought in some parts of the earth and unleashing enormous storms in the same parts or different ones. And it is not only climate change, since many natural resources are running low in quantity and quality. It has been predicted that primarily due to global warming, one-third of the earth will become unliveable in the near future. Indeed, it is now obvious that sustainability is the greatest challenge that humans have ever faced.
Robert Albritton

Chapter 9. Conclusion: “Time and Tides Wait for No One”

Abstract
The Coca-Cola plant in Chiapas Mexico has a contract to extract one million liters of water a day in order to produce sugary drinks. Between 2013 and 2016 the local mortality rate from diabetes in Chiapas has increased by 30%. Life expectancy in Sub-Saharan Africa is 49.2 years compared to 79.4 years for rich countries. These kinds of statistics are totally unnecessary given the global possibilities of redistribution of wealth and healthy food.
Robert Albritton

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