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Über dieses Buch

This textbook for core courses in Electronic Circuit Design teaches students the design and application of a broad range of analog electronic circuits in a comprehensive and clear manner. Readers will be enabled to design complete, functional circuits or systems. The authors first provide a foundation in the theory and operation of basic electronic devices, including the diode, bipolar junction transistor, field effect transistor, operational amplifier and current feedback amplifier. They then present comprehensive instruction on the design of working, realistic electronic circuits of varying levels of complexity, including power amplifiers, regulated power supplies, filters, oscillators and waveform generators. Many examples help the reader quickly become familiar with key design parameters and design methodology for each class of circuits. Each chapter starts from fundamental circuits and develops them step-by-step into a broad range of applications of real circuits and systems.

Written to be accessible to students of varying backgrounds, this textbook presents the design of realistic, working analog electronic circuits for key systems;Includes worked examples of functioning circuits, throughout every chapter, with an emphasis on real applications;Includes numerous exercises at the end of each chapter;Uses simulations to demonstrate the functionality of the designed circuits;Enables readers to design important electronic circuits including amplifiers, power supplies and oscillators.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. Semiconductor Diode

Abstract
The simplest electronic device is referred to as a diode. It consists essentially of two different materials in contact such that electric charge flows easily in one direction but is impeded in the other. Despite its simplicity, it performs an important role in electronic systems from the simple to the complex. In this chapter, we will discuss the nature and characteristics of the solid-state diode (i.e. one based on semiconductor material) as well as employ it in the design of modern electronic systems.
Stephan J. G. Gift, Brent Maundy

Chapter 2. Bipolar Junction Transistor

Abstract
The bipolar junction transistor or BJT is a device capable of amplifying a voltage or current, something that diodes are not able to do. This amplifying characteristic makes the BJT suitable for a wide range of applications. The device was invented in 1947 by Walter H. Brattain, John Bardeen and William Shockley who were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1956 for this invention. It revolutionized the electronics industry by enabling miniaturization of electronic circuits and increased equipment portability. This chapter discusses the characteristics of the BJT and its use in elementary amplifier circuits. At the end of it, the student will be able to:
Stephan J. G. Gift, Brent Maundy

Chapter 3. Field-Effect Transistor

Abstract
The field-effect transistor or FET is a three-terminal semiconductor device that controls an electric current by an electric field. The FET actually pre-dates the BJT as the first patent was granted for such a device in 1928. Its impact on industry however was felt only about a decade after the development of the transistor in 1948. The FET is a unipolar device having only one p-n junction, and it differs from the BJT in several important respects, the main one being the FET’s inherently high input impedance. There are two types of FETS: the junction gate FET (JFET or JUGFET) and the metal oxide semiconductor FET or MOSFET. The MOSFET, sometimes called the insulated gate FET or IGFET, itself comes in two versions: the depletion MOSFET and the enhancement MOSFET. Because of a difference in construction, the MOSFET has a higher input impedance than the JFET. The FET like the BJT can provide amplification of a signal and operate as a switch. It is important in many applications and forms the subject of this chapter. At the end of the chapter, the student will be able to:
Stephan J. G. Gift, Brent Maundy

Chapter 4. BJT and FET Models

Abstract
In Chaps. 2 and 3, the BJT and FET were introduced and their operation discussed. The need for biasing was established and various biasing schemes presented. Also, the operation of the BJT and FET as amplifiers each in three configurations was discussed. While the methods utilized gave reasonably good answers, more precise design requires the use of BJT and FET models or equivalent circuits. The models we adopt are the hybrid parameter or h-parameter model and the y-parameter model. These transistor parameters can in general be obtained from manufacturer’s data sheets. At the end of this chapter, the student will be able to:
Stephan J. G. Gift, Brent Maundy

Chapter 5. Multiple Transistor and Special Circuits

Abstract
In this chapter, several transistor circuit configurations are considered. These circuits generally involve more than one transistor and can be implemented in a wide range of applications as well as perform some special functions. In this chapter, the design and application of many of these circuits will be discussed. After completing the chapter, the reader will be able to:
Stephan J. G. Gift, Brent Maundy

Chapter 6. Frequency Response of Transistor Amplifiers

Abstract
The discussions in the previous chapters concerned the mid-frequency performance of an amplifier. At these frequencies, the coupling and bypass capacitors pass the signals virtually unimpeded, while the transistor junction capacitors are considered to be open circuits. The BJT and FET models provided useful tools with which to analyse these circuits. The performance at low and high frequencies however requires further consideration. In the case of the low frequencies, the effect of the coupling and bypass capacitors needs to be determined while at high frequencies the response which is largely determined by transistor junction capacitances needs to be ascertained. In this chapter therefore, more complex equivalent circuits are introduced in order to examine the full frequency response characteristics of BJTs and FETs. While the analysis is done using the JFET, it applies in general to the MOSFET also. After completing the chapter, the reader will be able to
  • Determine the low-frequency response of transistor amplifiers
  • Determine the high-frequency response of transistor amplifiers
Stephan J. G. Gift, Brent Maundy

Chapter 7. Feedback Amplifiers

Abstract
A feedback amplifier is one in which a portion of the output is fed back to the system input where it is combined with the input signal. The basic concept is shown in Fig. 7.1. At the amplifier input, the feedback signal which may be a voltage or current is combined with the input signal which is also a voltage or current through a summing or mixing network, and the resulting signal is passed into the amplifier system. The summing network is either a series circuit which mixes feedback voltage with source voltage or a shunt circuit which mixes feedback current with source current while the feedback network is most often a passive network, usually resistive.
Stephan J. G. Gift, Brent Maundy

Chapter 8. Operational Amplifiers

Abstract
The operational amplifier or op-amp is one of the most widely used linear integrated circuits today. Its great popularity arises from its versatility, usefulness, low cost and ease of use. It was introduced in the 1940s mainly for use in analog computers where it performed mathematical operations (hence the name) including addition, multiplication, integration and differentiation. The device later found ready application in a wide range of circuits and functions, many of which will be discussed in this chapter. At the end of the chapter, the student will be able to:
Stephan J. G. Gift, Brent Maundy

Chapter 9. Power Amplifiers

Abstract
An amplifier is a device for receiving a signal at its input and delivering a larger signal at its output. They are used in a wide range of applications including music systems, in driving industrial loads, and elsewhere. In small-signal amplifiers, the active devices are operated such that the voltage and current changes are small and the devices are operated in their approximately linear regions. In such amplifiers, the main factors are amplifier linearity, gain and noise performance.
Stephan J. G. Gift, Brent Maundy

Chapter 10. Power Supplies

Abstract
An electrical power source is essential for the operation of most electronic equipment. Some portable equipment such as radio receivers and pocket calculators may be battery operated, but most electronic equipment requires an electrical supply. In this chapter, we examine the operation and design of linear power supplies that convert an AC voltage from the public mains supply into a stable DC voltage. At the end of the chapter, the student will be able to:
Stephan J. G. Gift, Brent Maundy

Chapter 11. Active Filters

Abstract
A filter is an electrical network that passes signals within a specified band of frequencies while attenuating those signals that fall outside of this band. Passive filters utilize passive components, namely, resistors, capacitors and inductors, while active filters contain passive as well as active components such as transistors and operational amplifiers. Passive filters have the advantage of not requiring an external power supply as do active filters. However, they often utilize inductors which tend to be bulky and costly, whereas active filters utilize mainly resistors and capacitors. Additionally, active filters can produce signal gain and have high input and low output impedances which allow simple cascading of systems with little or no interaction between stages. This chapter discusses the principles of active filter operation and treats with several types and configurations of active filters. At the end of the chapter, the student will be able to:
Stephan J. G. Gift, Brent Maundy

Chapter 12. Oscillators

Abstract
Oscillators deliver an essentially sinusoidal output waveform without input excitation. They are used in a wide range of applications including testing, communication systems and computer systems. Frequencies range from about 10−3 Hz to 1010 Hz, and in many applications a low distortion is required. There are two main classes of oscillators; RC oscillators in which the frequency determining elements are resistors and capacitors and LC oscillators in which the frequency-determining elements are inductors and capacitors. RC oscillators operate from very low frequencies up to about 10 MHz, making them very useful for audio frequency applications, while LC oscillators are useful for frequencies above about 100 kHz, and they are usually used in communications applications. This chapter explores the basic principles governing this class of circuits. The conditions required for oscillation are investigated and frequency and amplitude stability studied. At the end of the chapter, the student will be able to:
Stephan J. G. Gift, Brent Maundy

Chapter 13. Waveform Generators and Non-linear Circuits

Abstract
In this chapter, we consider circuits that involve non-linear operation of the operational amplifier. These can be used to realize waveform generators which are circuits that produce a variety of non-sinusoidal waveforms. They are fundamentally instrumentation building blocks used for signal generation and test and measurement. Typically, waveform generators produce square waves, triangular waves, pulses and in some cases arbitrary waveforms over a range of frequencies with constant amplitude. Here we discuss comparators, op-amp-based free-running (astable) and one-shot (monostable) multivibrator circuits as well as precision rectifiers and other non-linear circuits. At the end of the chapter, the student will be able to:
Stephan J. G. Gift, Brent Maundy

Chapter 14. Special Devices

Abstract
In previous chapters we discussed several semiconductor devices including the diode, the BJT, the FET, the operational amplifier and the current feedback amplifier. There are several other devices that are available to the designer and we will discuss some of these in this chapter. At the end of the chapter the student will be able to
Stephan J. G. Gift, Brent Maundy

Backmatter

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