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About this book

Based on neuroscience research, this book presents and demonstrates a 'Ten Enablers' model as a framework to help change leaders successfully lead and manage change. It focuses on the execution of change processes within volatile and challenging emerging markets with high growth potential.

The book first presents the organizational development and change research on which the model is based, and discusses the basic neuroscience principles. It then introduces a systematic model of the ten enablers, taking readers through the process of change, from considering the ethos prior to embarking on it, including engagement of stakeholders, up to the final phase, where change leaders exit the process or the organization. It highlights this circular process through several step-by-step illustrations, supported by examples from emerging markets. Further, it includes neuroscience research and principles to help leaders understand and manage change in themselves and others. This well-researched and practical book is a valuable resource for students and professionals alike.

Table of Contents

Frontmatter

Theoretical Background

Frontmatter

1. Orientation to Change Leadership

Abstract
This chapter offers an orientation to Change Leadership as a domain of study. We provide an overview of the two parts of the book. Change leadership is required to effectively implement strategic objectives, with a specific focus on getting buy-in and taking people along on the change journey. We explain our research method and how to utilise the worksheets.
Caren Brenda Scheepers, Sonja Swart

2. Leadership of Change

Abstract
In this chapter, we discuss traditional change models, such as Lewin’s three-phase unfreezing model and Kotter’s eight steps. We also focus on misconceptions about change leadership, for example around top managements’ role, positioning of change leadership and styles of leadership. We differentiate between change and transformation and position this volume within the process change domain. The complexity of emerging markets renders our in-depth attention. We differentiate between frontier and emerging markets. The relevance of emerging markets for change leadership is discussed.
Caren Brenda Scheepers, Sonja Swart

3. Introduction to Neuroscience and Change

Abstract
This chapter introduces neuroscience and explains the relevance to change leadership. We explain the field of neuroscience, discuss the basics of brain anatomy and the principles of brain functioning. Our focus is on the normal functioning of the brain and the nervous system. For example, we share how self-directed neuroplasticity works and how it facilitates change. The important neurotransmitters and their impact on motivation and fight, flight or freeze receive attention in this chapter. We highlight the SCARF model of David Rock of NeuroLeadership and the application in the context of organisational change. We conclude with how reference to neuroscience knowledge can be applied in the Ten Enablers Model.
Caren Brenda Scheepers, Sonja Swart

Practical Application

Frontmatter

4. The Ten Enablers Model

Abstract
In this chapter, we offer the explanation of The Ten Enablers Model. The illustration of the ten enablers serves as a guide to empower change leaders to approach the process of change in a systematic manner. We start with the foundation of Ethos (Enabler 1), which focuses on the common good and not the enrichment of a selected few individuals or groups. Ego Mastery (Enabler 2) is essential for change leaders to remain centred, balanced and energised throughout the marathon of implementing change processes. Enablers 3 and 4, Explore and Eureka are focused on the context or external environment. Effective change leadership thus entails analysing external variables, such as the Political, Economic, Technological, Legislation and Environmental dynamics in the context. A systemic view of the organisation within its particular context serves the change leader in identifying past, present and future trends with hindsight, insight and foresight as aspects of contextual intelligence.
This analysis leads to identifying opportunities—a Eureka! moment, which represents a mind shift or insight into what is required for the organisation to flourish in its environment. The insight is Envisioned (Enabler 5) as an ideal future that represents the business case for the change. Engagement (Enabler 6) of stakeholders to share in the vision is essential to build commitment, prior to Embarking (Enabler 7) on the change. Planning the change process in detail with its critical path; as well as roles and responsibilities; with milestones and delivery dates are crucial in this phase to enable the Execution (Enabler 8) of actions. This enabler represents the typical management cycle of setting goals and monitoring goal achievement. The next enabler is Evaluating (Enabler 9) the progress of the change process to capture lessons learned and prevent the same mistakes in future change processes. Finally, change leaders have to Exit (Enabler 10) and allow their successors to lead.
Caren Brenda Scheepers, Sonja Swart

5. First Enabler

Ethos
Abstract
This chapter and the subsequent nine chapters are structured according to an orientation to the enabler, consisting of references to relevant current literature, relating the enabler specifically to emerging markets; followed by practical application examples, tips and exercises. We relate insight into neuroscience to each enabler and offer survey items as a measurement of the enabler. The conclusion links to the subsequent enablers. Enabler 1 entails establishing the ethos in the situation, that is assessing the character or beliefs and customs of the people and institution where the change process will be implemented. We consider Ethos as the moral compass that will ensure that we do what is right for the greater good. Several tools are described to assist change leaders in clarifying their own and their company’s values. We explain the waves of change experienced in South Africa as background to change leaders doing business in South Africa or those who are building alliances with South African companies.
Caren Brenda Scheepers, Sonja Swart

6. Second Enabler

Ego Mastery
Abstract
For leaders to overcome their egotistical needs and transcend to the common good, ego mastery is required. This chapter, therefore, offers practical exercises on self-awareness, self-reflection and mindfulness to improve ego mastery. Change leaders who are indeed able to master their egos, demonstrate self-directed leadership that makes independent decisions from their own convictions. This chapter pays attention to change leaders’ maintenance of their own energy. The dangers of burnout and depression, as well as possible treatments are important focus areas in this chapter. The elements of ego mastery are also linked to the relevant neuroscience facts and their implications. The chapter highlights India and the example of Gandhi’s role modelling and the ultimate influence on British colonial rule.
Caren Brenda Scheepers, Sonja Swart

7. Third Enabler: Explore

Abstract
This chapter emphasises the benefits of exploring the environment. We offer a systematic process to go about analysing the immediate organisational environment, by identifying strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats and the larger industrial environment, with a competitor analysis. Change leaders must investigate their context to identify business opportunities and therefore they need to look at the bigger picture. Neuroscience reveals that the brain experiences a positive response when a person is exposed to novel ideas. This chapter discusses the implications of our brains that look for new information. The emerging market featured in this chapter is China, which is the best performing emerging market. We discuss the implications of the Chinese historical and cultural background for exploring business opportunities with Chinese companies.
Caren Brenda Scheepers, Sonja Swart

8. Fourth Enabler

Eureka Moments
Abstract
This chapter builds on the previous chapter that focused on exploration of opportunities, as change leaders have to identify an opportunity and how to go about moving from the current reality to capitalise on the opportunity. Change leaders must develop a mental model or picture in their own minds about the changes that they want to propel or instigate. The chapter takes change leaders through a process to facilitate their Eureka moments and offer tips on how to facilitate others to reach insights and hopefully shifting mindsets or changing paradigms. These Eureka moments build commitment in employees to support the change process. We discuss the link between Eureka moments and innovation in organisations. Russia is an emerging market in this chapter, which receives attention, because Russia has experienced significant paradigm shifts in their history with the end of the Soviet Union.
Caren Brenda Scheepers, Sonja Swart

9. Fifth Enabler

Envision
Abstract
This chapter pays attention to the Fifth Enabler: Envision. We discuss the process of envisioning, for example to start with the vision of the future and the quantifying the vision, then to calculate the costs and the risk involved in changing, as well as the risk of maintaining the status quo by not changing. If there is not enough dissatisfaction with the status quo, there might not be enough energy to sustain the process of achieving the vision. We focus on the contribution of neuroscience in understanding the uniquely human characteristic to imagine the future. For example, the same parts of the brain are activated whether we are imagining or actually participating in an event. The emerging market featured in this chapter is Brazil.
Caren Brenda Scheepers, Sonja Swart

10. Sixth Enabler

Engage
Abstract
This chapter focuses on the Sixth Enabler: Engage, by identifying various stakeholder groups, whose engagement is essential to the successful implementation of the change process. We offer various models and frameworks to categorise these stakeholder groups. For example, identifying the relative support for the change process, due to stakeholder groups’ interest in and power over the change process. We share practical tips to elicit stakeholder engagement, for instance, by asking them questions about solutions regarding the change process, for them to derive their own insights. We explain the importance of role modelling the appropriate behaviour during change processes, by linking the knowledge of mirror neurons.
Caren Brenda Scheepers, Sonja Swart

11. Seventh Enabler

Embark
Abstract
In this chapter, we pay attention to the Seventh Enabler: Embarking. Identification of potential risks associated with implementing the change is an important element of this enabler. We offer exercises to systematically identify forces against the change and those people or things that are conducive to the implementation of the change. In this chapter, the resistance to change receives attention, as well as formulating a detailed communication strategy. Several tools offer the opportunity to systematically plan the when, what, how of executing the change process, for specific team members. When team members deliver actions, aligned to strategy on specific agreed upon dates, real progress towards implementation is evident.
Caren Brenda Scheepers, Sonja Swart

12. Eighth Enabler

Executex
Abstract
While the previous enabler paid attention to formulating the change plans when embarking on the change, this chapter Eighth Enabler focuses on the actual execution of these change plans and in particular, centring on entrenching the new way of doing in the culture of the organisation. We emphasise the cascading of the change strategy lower down in the organisation, requiring diverse, cross-functional teams to indeed execute relevant actions. This chapter highlights the forming of a habit as well as how to change habits on the individual level. Change leaders must take notice of this chapter, because they must be role models to others due to their own ability to change habits. The insight into how difficult it is and how much dedication and attention are required to change habits also assists change leaders in having empathy with others who are struggling to truly change behaviour.
Caren Brenda Scheepers, Sonja Swart

13. Ninth Enabler

Evaluate
Abstract
While the Eighth Enabler, Execute, made certain that the change plans are actually executed and that new habits are entrenched, this chapter on the Ninth Enabler, pays attention to evaluation. We offer practical tools to enable change leaders to initiate the process of receiving feedback from stakeholders regarding the way in which the change process was implemented and how it could be improved. The importance of continuous monitoring and evaluation is shared in this chapter. We share the benefits and discipline of evaluations throughout a change process, specifically establishing which lessons were learned to improve the next change process. We give examples of pertinent questions that must be asked of a change process. Neuroscience offers insight that evaluation could trigger a fear response and change leaders could benefit from taking this potential response into account. The continuous improvement process, enabled through regular evaluation, enables an ability to implement successful changes that improve over time.
Caren Brenda Scheepers, Sonja Swart

14. Tenth Enabler

Exit
Abstract
In this chapter, the final enabler receives attention. We advocate in this Tenth Enabler, Exit, for consolidation and celebration of milestones and creation of a sense of completion, before embarking on the next change processes. We discuss complicated bereavement to illustrate the difficulties that human beings experience with separation from things, institutions or people that they had become attached to. This Tenth Enabler, Exit symbolises an ending of an existing process and movement to a new change process, with hopefully even greater opportunities and an enlarging scale of impact. Change leaders will benefit from taking note of the importance of making an ending and thanking people personally who supported them through change processes, prior to exciting. We highlight specific examples of how change leaders had made successful exits and how it assisted their organisations, when a successor had been identified in advance and the baton had been successfully handed over.
Caren Brenda Scheepers, Sonja Swart

15. Conclusion and Future Research

Abstract
This final chapter focuses on an overview of our Ten Enablers model. We invite change leaders to decide on at least one action that they could take to move their change processes forward. This chapter emphasises that the final, Tenth Enabler should link with the First Enabler, Ethos. For example, the wisdom gained through the reflection in Enabler 1, offers input on the pace of change and when the next wave of change should be introduced. The learning points from the previous wave of change, assists the next wave to be more effective. We refer back to the helix model to illustrate the continuous waves of change. Emerging change in complexity science also receives attention as the next wave in our personal learning journey as change leaders.
Caren Brenda Scheepers, Sonja Swart
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