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2021 | Book

Climate Change and Food Security in Asia Pacific

Response and Resilience

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About this book

Using an interdisciplinary approach, this book evaluates the complex nexus between climate change and regional food security in Asia Pacific. Feeding the planet puts a lot of stress on the environment. The fundamental challenges we are facing today include how to grow more from less in a sustainable manner; how to optimize the entire food value chain from field to fork to reduce the carbon footprint, protect the environment and support biological diversity, cause less water pollution and soil erosion, raise levels of nutrition, improve agricultural productivity, better the lives of rural populations and contribute to the growth of the world economy. With a robust multi-site study in Southeast Asia, Pacific Island Forum and South Asia, this book examines the regional initiatives on, the current state of, and the future prospects for mitigations and resilience regarding climate change and food security vis-à-vis other regions of the world.

Table of Contents

Frontmatter
Chapter 1. Tackling Regional Climate Change and Food Security Issues: An Introduction
Abstract
Regional organizations are central to effectively addressing the current and future impacts of climate change and food security issues. Climate change and food security issues can only be dealt with through extensive policies that adopt a multi-sector, multi-stakeholder approach. An examination of three regional organizations (the Association of Southeast Asian Nations, the Pacific Islands Forum, and the South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation) can provide new insights into current climate change mitigation policies that will ensure food security for future generations. This opening chapter thus begins with the premise that regional organizations are optimally positioned to address climate change and food security issues while actively engaging global partners to reverse current trajectories. Although many regional organizations acknowledge that climate change and food security are of utmost importance, they face multifaceted obstacles that impede the region’s ability to effectively cope with these problems. This chapter briefly reviews current initiatives undertaken by regional organizations such as ASEAN, PIF, and SAARC; analyses these initiatives according to five criteria, showing how regional cooperation may contribute to climate change and food security initiatives; and highlights impediments to the formulation of progressive policies in the future. It draws connections between the efficacy of policies and the politico-economic processes that impact the development, cooperation, and execution of regional policies. The remaining part of the chapter highlights methodology used in this book, organization of chapters, and implications of the book for the political economy of food and climate change in the age of vulnerability.
Md Saidul Islam, Edson Kieu
Chapter 2. Climate Change and Food (In)Security Nexus
Abstract
The issue of climate change has been gaining widespread attention and concern as it has the ability to directly/indirectly affect our standard of living and quality of life. It has often been postulated that changes in climate would have a vast effect on food production systems and that food security might be threatened due to increasing climate change. However, it seems that research on climate change and food (in)security has often been one-sided; with climate change being identified as the cause of food insecurity and not how the systems in place to ensure food security have exacerbated the issue of climate change. This chapter thus seeks to give a more balanced view and thus understanding of the complex relationship between climate change and food security by critically examining both systems.
Md Saidul Islam, Edson Kieu
Chapter 3. Climate Change and Food Security in ASEAN
Abstract
This chapter establishes the historical background to ASEAN and its member states, highlights the impacts of climate change on food security in the region, and provides an analysis of the efficacy of the regional initiatives to mitigate regional-level risks of food security considering the impact of climate change. The chapter inquires and assesses the current state of activity within the region. The regional case study examines regional policies, notwithstanding that individual member states may have national-level policies and programs to mitigate climate change and food security risks. Secondly, policies specific to food security and climate change in tandem have been presented here as considerations for climate change and food security as separate issues are beyond the scope and aims of this chapter.
Md Saidul Islam, Edson Kieu
Chapter 4. Climate Change and Food Security in SAARC
Abstract
This chapter synthesizes the impact of climate change and food security on South Asian region, providing: (1) background and history to SAARC and its member states, (2) highlighting the impacts of climate change and food security on SAARC, and (3) providing an analysis of the regional initiatives and its effectiveness to mitigate regional risks of food security considering climate change impacts. The chapter aims to adequately examine the efficacy of SAARC mitigation measures, SAARC adaptive and mitigating measures on issues regarding food security and climate change. Similar to Chapter 3, this regional case study only examines regional policies, notwithstanding that individual member states do have their ways to mitigate climate change and food security impacts. Secondly, policies specific to food security and climate change in tandem have been presented here.
Md Saidul Islam, Edson Kieu
Chapter 5. Climate Change and Food Security in PIF
Abstract
This chapter will present: (1) an understanding about PIF and its member states, (2) highlight the impacts of climate change and food security on PIF, and (3) provide an overview of regional initiatives undertaken and its efficacy to mitigate regional risks related to food security due to climate change impacts. To adequately examine the efficacy of PIF mitigation measures, PIF adaptive and mitigating measures on issues regarding food security and climate change will be inquired and assessed thereby elucidating the current state of action within the region. Similar to previous chapters 3 and 4, the PIF case study examines regional policies, even though individual member states may develop its national-level policies and programs to mitigate impacts from climate change and food security risks. Secondly, the chapter refers to policies specific to both food security and climate change in tandem. Such policies will only be presented here as considerations for climate change and food security as discrete matters will be considered as beyond the scope and aims of this chapter.
Md Saidul Islam, Edson Kieu
Chapter 6. Climate Change and the Environment: The Chindia (China and India) Dilemma
Abstract
In recent decades, China and India’s economic development brought both countries to the forefront as the two largest emitters today. Reports by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and a plethora of other studies highlight that both countries face similar threats from ecological degradation. Apart from ecological degradation, China and India face additional challenges related to food and water scarcity due to the impacts of climate change. However, as emerging players in the international economy, China and India face other developmental challenges such as socioeconomic development and poverty. Climate change, environmental degradation, and food security will have to be balanced precariously with developmental goals. This chapter examines Chindia’s (China and India) Dilemma by looking at the challenges both countries face. We have examined China and India in this chapter by exploring (1) Chindia’s economic developments thus far, (2) the impacts of climate change on food security in Chindia, and (3) approaches Chindia undertake to address the associated problems.
Md Saidul Islam, Edson Kieu
Chapter 7. Urban Food Security and Sustainability in Asian Cities
Abstract
Because of increasing rural–urban migration, cities in the world currently hosting more than half of the world’s population are grappling with food security, which itself is complicated by other factors including climate change. The problem will be even more severe since over 70% of the global population will be living in cities concentrating largely in Asia in the next 30 years. Taking the cases of two Asian Tigers, Singapore and Hong Kong, this chapter offers an understanding of how vulnerable highly dependent food-importing cities can survive in an increasingly urbanized, capitalistic, and environmentally eroding world. Drawing on a framework of “challenges for urban food security” in the age of vulnerability and employing a robust content analysis substantiated by other primary methods in both Singapore and Hong Kong, the chapter explains why and how cities in the world are vulnerable to food security despite economic prosperity, and examines broader responses to battle food insecurity for its growing inhabitants.
Md Saidul Islam, Edson Kieu
Chapter 8. China and India’s Involvement in Land and Water Grabs
Abstract
The 2007–2008 global financial crisis is considered as the worst global economic crisis since the Great Depression. Many countries were hit hard by the recession and scrambled to acquire water and land in order to secure food and financial security. India and China were two countries that were heavily involved in land and water grabs around the world. As such, this chapter seeks to explore why, where, and how both these heavyweight countries have acquired land. It explores the extent of their global land and water grabs, while also identifying if their actions have had any impacts on the affected countries.
Md Saidul Islam, Edson Kieu
Chapter 9. Green Movements, Food Justice, and Sovereignty in Asia
Abstract
Food security extends beyond the provision of relief from economic woes and environmental disasters but rather, it should be designed in ways that enable the disadvantaged sections of the population to break out of a vicious cycle of poverty and insecurity. As such, food security echoes the need for sustainable and actionable ways where people from all walks of live have the means and ability to ensure both equitable and sustainable production and consumption of food—food justice and food sovereignty. This chapter will provide: (1) a summary regarding concepts on the notion of food sovereignty and food justice, (2) examine both top-down and bottom-up organized green movements within Asia, (3) examine the impact of green movements on food security, and (4) reflect on food security and food sovereignty. Here, we examine Asia-Pacific countries, not specific to ASEAN, SAARC or PIF but takes a wholesome view of the region. By examining such concepts, the chapter aims to highlight the complexities of food security and sovereignty as a movement which poses as a political challenge to neoliberal hegemony.
Md Saidul Islam, Edson Kieu
Chapter 10. Toward a Sustainable Food System in Asia-Pacific Amid Climate Crises
Abstract
Climate change and food security issues are multi-faceted and transcend national boundaries. Regional organizations are therefore optimally positioned to address climate change and food security issues, while actively engaging global partners to slow down or reverse current trajectories. This closing chapter concludes the book by summarizing the findings, showing patterns and pitfalls across the regions, and pathways for a sustainable food system in the Asia-Pacific region.
Md Saidul Islam, Edson Kieu
Backmatter
Metadata
Title
Climate Change and Food Security in Asia Pacific
Authors
Md Saidul Islam
Edson Kieu
Copyright Year
2021
Electronic ISBN
978-3-030-70753-8
Print ISBN
978-3-030-70752-1
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-70753-8

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