Skip to main content
main-content
Top

Hint

Swipe to navigate through the chapters of this book

2022 | OriginalPaper | Chapter

8. Cultivate Creative Collaboration

Author: Andrea Picchi

Published in: Design Management

Publisher: Apress

share
SHARE

Abstract

In the middle of the 20th century, the lifetime of a company was circa 65 years; today, it is approximately a decade. The business landscape changes rapidly in the modern world, leading to disruption from multiple angles; organizations worldwide are under pressure to remain relevant and competitive. Thriving in this new ecosystem requires embracing creativity and creative collaboration to keep individuals and organizations inspired, motivated, and visionary. Under these conditions, companies began to hire creative problem-solvers and support innovative ways of working with the intent to push the boundaries of their sectors. In this chapter, you will learn how to cultivate creative collaboration. You will explore the nature of creativity with its cognitive and social components, analyze its behavioral dynamics, and learn how to promote and support the creative problem-solving process. You will also learn how to lead for creativity and examine the three leadership modalities required to manage a design team like a leader cultivating the cognitive and social preconditions that support the behaviors necessary to face uncertainty and curiously venture into the unknown, unlock experiential learning, and sustain creative collaboration.
Footnotes
1
Intellectual functions define the mental operations and resources involved in the acquisition of information with the intent to bend, break, and blend its constituents, developing concepts and hypotheses. Memory, imagination, and empathy can also be considered intellectual functions.
 
2
As introduced in Chapter 4, reflection-in-action is also known as reframing.
 
3
Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is the principal molecule for storing and transferring energy in living cells.
 
4
Revisit Chapter 7 to review how to communicate about performance.
 
5
An investigational prototype materializes a concept with a high degree of abstraction, with the intent to promote reflection-in-action.
 
6
A sacrificial prototype materializes a concept with a low degree of confidence in originality and appropriateness, with the intent to promote reflection-in-action.
 
7
The authority bias is the tendency to accept the perspective of an individual based on the level of role power of that person.
 
8
The belief bias is the tendency to evaluate the logical validity of an argument considering the believability of the conclusion.
 
9
The confirmation bias is the tendency to process, interpret, and use information in a way that confirms a preconception.
 
Metadata
Title
Cultivate Creative Collaboration
Author
Andrea Picchi
Copyright Year
2022
Publisher
Apress
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4842-6954-1_8

Premium Partners