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Table of Contents

Frontmatter

Environmental Management: Introduction

Frontmatter

1. Environmental Management

Abstract
Strong and developing awareness of environmental issues has, for some considerable time, put increasing pressure on commercial and, in particular, manufacturing and industrial organisations to improve their environmental standards. More generally, organisations of many kinds are more conscious of the need to mitigate any adverse effects of their business. Their perception is twofold, first in the expectation of increasingly stringent governmental legislation at both national and international levels, second in response to increasing intolerance and concern demonstrated by the general public for environmentally unsound business practice. No longer can any organisation be in ignorance of, or simply choose to ignore, environmental, or what are often termed ‘green’, issues.
Alan Griffith

Environmental Management: System Development

Frontmatter

2. Environmental Management Specification

Abstract
Specification for environmental management systems is presented in BS 7750.1 This standard specifies the basic requirements for the formulation, development, implementation and maintenance of an environmental management system directed towards compliance with an organisation’s stated environmental policy and objectives.
Alan Griffith

3. Environmental Management: Detailed Requirements of a System

Abstract
To clearly demonstrate that an organisation has concern for and commitment to environmental issues it must establish and maintain an environmental management system. This system shall ensure that the effects of an organisation’s activities conform, first, with environmental legislation and, second, with its own stated environmental policy, objectives, principles and procedures.
Alan Griffith

4. Developing an Environmental Management System within the Organisation

Abstract
An environmental management system aims to provide a platform on which the organisation can best meet its responsibilities to, and show commitment for, the environment. It forms the basis upon which improvements to the organisation can be founded and, moreover, it portrays to the outside world that the organisation’s business is conducted with consistency to a standard that is recognised and respected.
Alan Griffith

Application of Environmental Management within the Construction Industry

Frontmatter

5. Environmental Management in the Construction Process

Abstract
Much has been banded about in recent years as to how ecology must be balanced with the man-made environment in an attempt to reintroduce traditional virtues of sustainable architecture. Given the problems that currently face the environment at local, national and international levels, not forgetting the global issues, the broader perspective is both valid and admirable and yet a holistic approach re-establishing building and construction within the laws of nature seems almost intangible at this time.
Alan Griffith

6. Environmental Assessment: Its Application to the Development Process

Abstract
It was identified in Chapter 5 that environmental Assessment (EA), sometimes referred to as Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA), is a procedure for ensuring that the potential environmental effects of any new development or project are considered before it is allowed to proceed. There can be little doubt, if any, that all construction development has a profound effect upon its environs and a formalised procedure of environmental assessment is fundamentally crucial in seeking to mitigate potentially harmful environmental effects. Despite its current and somewhat vague status, environmental assessment is not a new concept. Its principles have been firmly applied since the early 1970s, primarily in the oil, gas and petro-chemical industries, although manufacturing and other industries have followed. Within the construction industry, its concepts became formalised in the legislative processes in the mid to late 1980s. The philosophy, concept, procedures and practices of environmental assessment have already begun to become ingrained in the construction of major developments and look set to influence a greater proportion of construction projects in the future. Its implications, therefore, are well recognised. Environmental assessment is a vital component in the concept of environmental management, with environmental management systems representing a useful tool for developers in conducting environmental assessments of their projects.
Alan Griffith

7. Environmental Management: Its Application to Briefing, Design and Contract Administration

Abstract
Clearly, environmental management cannot and will not happen by itself. Effective environmental management can only be realised if the many and diverse factors contributing to the construction process are consciously brought together and, moreover, the various building professionals involved perceive the need for environmental management with integrity and commitment The plain fact is that whilst some aspects of environmental management are imposed by regulation, many aspects rely upon voluntary implementation by informed clients, responsible designers and specifiers and responsive contractors. It is the responsibility of all parties, acting individually and in combination, to ensure that the basic requirements for effective environmental management are met. This chapter addresses the contributions towards environmental management that may be made during the briefing, design and contract administration phases of the construction project process.
Alan Griffith

8. Environmental Management in Construction: An Overview

Abstract
It is overwhelmingly evident that many organisations in virtually all industrial sectors throughout Europe are incorporating a formal environmental policy as part of their corporate responsibility, indeed some have taken the unprecedented step toward environmental auditing. Notwithstanding, environmental awareness remains at a disturbingly low level within the construction industry. The construction industry has been slow to respond to environmental issues compared with other major industries, both across Europe and particularly in the UK. This seems to demonstrate a somewhat short-term perspective, perhaps waiting for market forces and legislation to determine its interest. With the rapid emergence of increasingly stringent environmental legislation both in the EC and the UK, organisations will find that they simply have to react to changing circumstance. Companies which demonstrate vision and anticipate future environmental demands will be in a position of competitive advantage, able to respond to changing environmental circumstances with greater success.
Alan Griffith

Backmatter

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