Skip to main content
main-content
Top

About this book

This book details zeolites, their structures and the parameters that influence their synthesis, providing a new and actual perspective of this field. Following this, the authors show different processes used to synthesize zeolites using residues, natural materials, and other eco-friendly materials such as raw powder glass, clays, aluminum cans, diatomites, rice ashes or coal ashes. Finally, this book gives the reader a wide range of different synthesis methods that they can be applied to several industrial processes.

Table of Contents

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. Zeolites: What Are They?

Abstract
In this chapter, the main aspects of the study of zeolites including the chronology of the research, structural descriptions and classification of the zeolitic materials are described.
Rafael Chaves Lima, Lindiane Bieseki, Paloma Vinaches Melguizo, Sibele Berenice Castellã Pergher

Chapter 2. Zeolite Synthesis: General Aspects

Abstract
Studies focusing on zeolite synthesis in the field of sol-gel chemistry have been carried out since the 1940s. The large number of studies on this subject is due to both the scientific interest in the complexity and diversity of molecular sieves and the potential applicability of nanoporous solids in industrial processes (Livage in Advanced zeolite science and applications. Studies in surface science and catalysis. Elsevier, Amsterdam, pp. 1–42, 1994; Cundy and Cox in Microporous Mesoporous Mater 82:1–78, 2005).
Rafael Chaves Lima, Lindiane Bieseki, Paloma Vinaches Melguizo, Sibele Berenice Castellã Pergher

Chapter 3. Zeolite Eco-friendly Synthesis

Abstract
In early 1980s, the knowledge of zeolite synthesis was already considerable, especially in relation to zeolite synthesis based on the use of inorganic structure-directing cations. At the same time, many studies began to explore the use of new sources of silicon and aluminum such as coal ash and ash from rice husk. The interest in these alternative sources of silicon and aluminum stemmed from two reasons: the first reason is to reduce the cost of zeolite synthesis of and the second reason is to add value to waste or natural raw materials such as clays. Adding value to waste is of great interest because these materials are usually environmental liabilities and using these materials in synthesis can generate profits and contribute to environmental remediation. This chapter addresses eco-friendly zeolite synthesis with the focus of using natural raw materials and waste. An overview of synthesis using these raw materials is presented, focusing on the main parameters studied in zeolite synthesis from alternative sources. The main advances in the syntheses using this type of material are presented.
Rafael Chaves Lima, Lindiane Bieseki, Paloma Vinaches Melguizo, Sibele Berenice Castellã Pergher

Chapter 4. Recipes of Some Ecofriendly Syntheses

Abstract
In this chapter, we described some ecofriendly synthesis studied and published by present and former members of LABPEMOL (Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil), some of them in collaboration with other research groups. As described in the previous chapters, all the synthesis included in this section followed the hydrothermal synthesis (Fig. 4.1). The first step was referred to the gel formation, at room temperature (r. t.) or with heating. Then, the gel was transferred to an autoclave and introduced in a static oven at the required temperature for a variable number of days. And, finally, the solid product was recovered by filtration, washed and dried.
Rafael Chaves Lima, Lindiane Bieseki, Paloma Vinaches Melguizo, Sibele Berenice Castellã Pergher

Backmatter

Additional information

Premium Partners

    Image Credits