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About this book

This book is intended for students and engineers who design and develop liquid-propellant rocket engines, offering them a guide to the theory and practice alike. It first presents the fundamental concepts (the generation of thrust, the gas flow through the combustion chamber and the nozzle, the liquid propellants used, and the combustion process) and then qualitatively and quantitatively describes the principal components involved (the combustion chamber, nozzle, feed systems, control systems, valves, propellant tanks, and interconnecting elements). The book includes extensive data on existing engines, typical values for design parameters, and worked-out examples of how the concepts discussed can be applied, helping readers integrate them in their own work. Detailed bibliographical references (including books, articles, and items from the “gray literature”) are provided at the end of each chapter, together with information on valuable resources that can be found online. Given its scope, the book will be of particular interest to undergraduate and graduate students of aerospace engineering.

Table of Contents

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. Fundamental Concepts on Liquid-Propellant Rocket Engines

Abstract
The engine of a rocket vehicle is a machine which produces thrust by accelerating a gas flowing through the machine. The reaction to this acceleration is the force which drives the vehicle. The amount of thrust generated depends on the mass flow rate of the gas moving through the engine and on the exit velocity of the gas from the nozzle. The gas flow, the liquid propellants, the combustion process, and the principal components of a rocket engine are discussed here.
Alessandro de Iaco Veris

Chapter 2. The Thrust Chamber Assembly

Abstract
The principal components, i.e., the combustion chamber and the nozzle, of the thrust chamber of a rocket engine are presented and discussed together with their performance parameters. Injectors, engine cycles, and igniters are discussed. Methods are given for their quantitative design. Cooling systems and combustion stabilising devices are also presented.
Alessandro de Iaco Veris

Chapter 3. Feed Systems Using Gases Under Pressure

Abstract
A feed system is necessary to transfer either a mono-propellant or an oxidiser and a fuel from their respective tanks to the thrust chamber of a rocket engine. The feed systems discussed here are based on gases stored at high pressures. These gases are used to inject the propellants at high pressures into the main combustion chamber of the engine. The requirements for such gases and the devices used for their use are also presented.
Alessandro de Iaco Veris

Chapter 4. Feed Systems Using Turbo-Pumps

Abstract
A feed system is necessary to transfer either a mono-propellant or an oxidiser and a fuel from their respective tanks to the thrust chamber of a rocket engine. The feed systems discussed here are based on turbo-pumps, in which one or more turbines are used to drive pumps. The pumps, in turn, increase the pressures of the liquid propellants above their values of storage in the tanks, for the purpose of injecting them at high pressures into the main combustion chamber of the engine.
Alessandro de Iaco Veris

Chapter 5. Control Systems and Valves

Abstract
Control systems are necessary in rocket engines to regulate parameters (such as pressure in the combustion chamber, thrust magnitude and direction, and propellant mixture ratio and consumption) during normal engine operation and also during start-up and shut-down transients. The principal actuators used for control functions (such as valves, regulators, pressure switches, and flow controls) are described here.
Alessandro de Iaco Veris

Chapter 6. Tanks for Propellants

Abstract
Tanks containing liquid propellants for rocket engines can be considered as shells whose thin walls are surfaces of revolution. Such surfaces result from a plane curve which rotates about some straight line lying in the plane which contains the curve. The structural analysis of tanks is presented here by using Roark’s formulas for stress and strain. Loads due to propellant sloshing and slosh-suppression devices are also discussed.
Alessandro de Iaco Veris

Chapter 7. Interconnecting Components and Structures

Abstract
Interconnecting structures for rocket engines and fluid-carrying ducts which incorporate elements such as bellows, flexible joints, flexible hoses, and flanges are presented here. Coupling components, joints, and filters are also discussed. Vibration control in pumps is considered. Design methods and calculation examples are given for such elements.
Alessandro de Iaco Veris
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