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2021 | OriginalPaper | Chapter

2. India and Africa: Is the Cooperation Sustainable?

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Abstract

India and Africa share a long history of amicable political relations, which has led a partnership of diversified functionality and economic association between the two regions. The three India-Africa Forum Summits dispersed over the first two decades of the twenty-first century have strengthened India-Africa cooperation significantly. The framework of cooperation adopted at the inaugural India-Africa Forum Summit (IAFS-I) as well as the framework of enhanced cooperation adopted at the subsequent forum summit, just three years later, positioned agriculture at the top of the list of India-Africa collaborations. Indian Technical and Economic Cooperation (ITEC) programme has led bilateral efforts in a variety of fields and provided the framework for India’s foreign policy engagement with the developing countries, including those in Africa. Under ITEC’s sister programme, the Special Commonwealth African Assistance Program (SCAAP), several African countries such as Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria, Malawi, Tanzania, etc. are invited to share in Indian developmental experiences and technologies. India and Africa share mutually beneficial opportunities available for Government-to-Government (G2G) and Business-to-Government (B2G) cooperation in the field of sustainable agriculture. Initiatives under the ITEC programme and the IAFS processes aim to harness this complementarity and improve the standards of production, consumption, and input technology, as well as the acquisition and channelling of foreign direct investment (FDI) and technology from private investors into Africa.
Footnotes
1
The RCEP aims to create a free trade zone of 10 ASEAN countries, Australia, China, India, Japan, South Korea and New Zealand. This will create a zero-customs duty zone in a geography that contributes 34% of global gross domestic product (GDP) and 40% of world trade. The region accounts for about 50% of the global population (Sharma 2019).
 
2
India has reservation to the signing of the proposed RCEPs is that it would entail the opening of her markets, services and investments, etc. to the RCEP member countries which could prove detrimental to her national interest. Therefore, the RCEP will need to reconcile the concerns of all the member countries.
 
3
Ethiopia had a surplus production of flowers and vegetables which were to be flown into Amsterdam and Dubai for marketing. Ethiopian Airways, the domestic carrier, stepped-up with increased cargo capacity to facilitate such heavy exports to international markets.
 
Literature
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Metadata
Title
India and Africa: Is the Cooperation Sustainable?
Author
Gurjit Singh
Copyright Year
2021
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-54112-5_2

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