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About this book

This book presents the state-of-the-art in infrared thermography (IRT) applications with a focus on moisture assessment in buildings. It also offers practical discussions of several case studies, including comparisons of IRT with other surface temperature measurement techniques. In closing, it demonstrates how IRT can be used to assess capillary absorption, and addresses moisture in walls due to wind-driven rain infiltrations, and the drying process.

The book equips readers with a deeper understanding of the ideal conditions for accurate IRT assessment and offers practical recommendations.

Table of Contents

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. Introduction

Abstract
Moisture is one of the main causes of pathologies in buildings and, thus, has always aroused great interest within the scientific community. This chapter presents a state of the art concerning infrared thermography (IRT) applications with focus on moisture assessment in buildings.
Eva Barreira, Ricardo M. S. F. Almeida

Chapter 2. Measurement of Surface Temperature Using Different Devices

Abstract
.There are several parameters that can influence significantly the measurement of surface temperatures using IRT. For that reason, this issue is deeply discussed in this chapter, including a comparison between the values obtained using three different devices (infrared camera, infrared thermometer and type T thermocouples). The chapter describes the methodology and the results attained in two experimental campaigns, one in situ and the other one in laboratory. In the in situ case study, the surface temperature of various finishing materials on the façades of a building was measured in different periods of the day and at different distances. The second campaign (laboratory) consisted in selecting materials with different emissivity and exposing them to external environmental conditions, while measuring their surface temperature.
Eva Barreira, Ricardo M. S. F. Almeida

Chapter 3. IRT Versus Moisture: Laboratory Tests

Abstract
The applicability of IRT to assess moisture was evaluated in the laboratory using full-scale models. Two situations were evaluated: moisture intake due to rising damp and the drying process of a moist surface. In both cases, the passive approach was implemented as no external heat source was used. Moist areas were detected due to the effect of evaporative cooling at the surface. A wall made of limestone blocks was selected as a case study to assess rising damp. The specimen was partially immersed in water for about 3 weeks, and thermal images were taken before and during the absorption period. To assess the drying process of a moist surface, a typical brick wall covered with painted rendering was sprayed with water on a limited area and thermal images were taken during the drying period, which lasted about 10 days. For the two phenomena, besides thermal images, a moisture detector was also used to qualitatively evaluate the moisture content of the walls.
Eva Barreira, Ricardo M. S. F. Almeida

Chapter 4. IRT Versus Moisture: In Situ Tests in Indoor Environment

Abstract
This chapter describes a test campaign to evaluate the applicability of IRT to detect moisture in walls of buildings in use. The passive approach was implemented and moisture was detected due to the effect of evaporative cooling. Moisture in the walls under study had two different sources: rising damp and infiltration of rainwater. Rising damp was assessed in an exterior wall of a basement in a residential building, and infiltration of rainwater was evaluated in three locations, two exterior walls of a room in a residential building and in a wall of a classroom. The thermal images were compared with the results provided by a moisture detector.
Eva Barreira, Ricardo M. S. F. Almeida

Chapter 5. IRT Versus Drying: In Situ Tests in Outdoor Environment

Abstract
The applicability of IRT to assess the drying process of exterior walls after a long-term rainy period was evaluated through in situ tests. The physical phenomenon underlying these measurements was the effect of evaporative cooling, and the passive approach was implemented. Simultaneously, a moisture detector was also used to qualitatively assess the evolution of the moisture content of the walls. The walls under study were coated with similar rendering and painting, but they presented different exposure to solar and thermal radiation.
Eva Barreira, Ricardo M. S. F. Almeida
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