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2024 | Book

Machine Tools Production Systems 1

Machine Types and Application Fields

Authors: Christian Brecher, Manfred Weck

Publisher: Springer Berlin Heidelberg

Book Series : Lecture Notes in Production Engineering

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About this book

The first part of the Machine Tools and Production Systems Compendium presents the wide range of machine tools and a comprehensive overview of different machine types. Based on the categorization of manufacturing processes according to the German standard DIN 8580, the different areas of application of machine tools are delineated and the various machine designs, the mechanical structure as well as the functions of the machine types are explained. Numerous three-dimensional illustrations of the principles, color photos, section drawings and schematic diagrams supplement the explanations and provide visual support. First, the machine types for the different manufacturing processes are described — before the multi-machine systems are explained. This is followed by a detailed presentation of the various equipment components of machine tools. In the last newly introduced chapter, the volume is concluded by a comprehensive and detailed explanation of three design examples of selected machine tools based on assembly drawings.

The German Machine Tools and Production Systems Compendium has been completely revised. The previous five-volume series has been condensed into three volumes in the new ninth edition with colored technical illustrations throughout. This first English edition is a translation of the German ninth edition.

Table of Contents

Frontmatter
Chapter 1. Introduction
Abstract
Tools and production equipment have always played a key role in the economic and social development of society. The mechanization of manufacturing processes and the provision of, initially, mechanical, and later of electrical, energy was at the heart of the Industrial Revolution: This started in the late eighteenth century and brought about fundamental changes in society and hitherto unknown economic growth, initially in England and Europe, later in the USA and Japan, and now in nearly every part of the world. Production equipment is also required to manufacture the necessary manufacturing and energy generation systems. Machine tools represent the most important element of this production equipment in the industrial field. For this reason, the machine tool is known as the “mother of all machines” [CIUP16; KÖHN16].
Christian Brecher, Manfred Weck
Chapter 2. Primary Forming Machines and Systems
Abstract
The term primary forming is used to describe the production of a solid body of a specified shape from a material which is present in a formless initial state in liquid or powder form. During the primary forming process, the material changes its state, and it retains its solid cohesion over the entire workpiece volume.
Christian Brecher, Manfred Weck
Chapter 3. Forming and Severing Machines
Abstract
“Forming”, according to DIN 8580 [DIN03f], is understood as the technical manufacturing term for shaping workpieces by ductile (plastic) alteration of the geometry of an object. In this process, both the mass and the cohesion of the material are maintained. However, the partial masses are distributed differently.
Christian Brecher, Manfred Weck
Chapter 4. Metal Cutting Machines for Tools with Geometrically Defined Cutting Edge (Chip Removal)
Abstract
The manufacturing processes of machining with geometrically defined cutting edge belong to the main group of cutting. Their categorization into manufacturing processes according to DIN 8580 [DIN03f] is shown in Fig. 4.1.
Christian Brecher, Manfred Weck
Chapter 5. Metal Cutting Machines for Tools with Geometrically Undefined Cutting Edges (Chip Removal)
Abstract
The cutting manufacturing process “Machining with geometrically undefined cutting edges” includes processes which use tools whose number of cutting edges, geometry of the wedges, and position of the cutting edges with respect to the workpiece are undefined. The classification of the manufacturing processes to and the various subcategories are shown in Fig. 5.1. Figure 5.2 shows material removal using a tool (in this instance, a grinding wheel) with cutting edges that rotates at a high cutting speed relative to the workpiece. The cutting speeds range of 18–80 m/s for conventional corundum and silicon carbide grinding wheels and of 80–180 m/s for high-performance diamond and CBN grinding wheels.
Christian Brecher, Manfred Weck
Chapter 6. Material Removal Machines
Abstract
Material removal machines fall under the cutting manufacturing process (see Fig. 6.1). DIN 8590 [DIN03a] differentiates between chemical, thermal, and electrochemical removal. These three categories are subdivided into further manufacturing processes. Discussed below, however, are only the processes that can be performed with conventional processes and machine tools.
Christian Brecher, Manfred Weck
Chapter 7. Machines for Laser Machining
Abstract
The term LASER, which is widely used nowadays, is an abbreviation for a physical principle and stands for Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation. The term LASER is now commonly used as a synonym for laser beam sources.
Christian Brecher, Manfred Weck
Chapter 8. Single-Purpose Machines
Abstract
To manufacture gears, high-precision machine tools with complex kinematic interdependencies of the machine axes movements are required. The geometrical diversity of workpieces depends on the numerous types of gears and gear transmissions in use. The different gear drive designs can be manufactured cost-effectively on very specific gear cutting machines using special gear manufacturing methods.
Christian Brecher, Manfred Weck
Chapter 9. Multi-Machine Systems
Abstract
There has been a demand for continually increasing flexibility and productivity of industrial production since machine tools have been in existence. Figure 9.1 shows how the multi-machine systems described in this chapter can be classified with regard to the fundamentally conflicting demands for the maximum flexibility and productivity. In addition to the group of multi-machine systems, individual machines are also listed.
Christian Brecher, Manfred Weck
Chapter 10. Equipment Components for Machine Tools
Abstract
A comprehensive explanation of standard and additional equipment for all machine tool types is not possible within the scope of this book. The focus of the discussion here is equipment for drilling and milling machines as well as lathes. After describing the tasks and relevance of equipment components, their functional principles are explained.
Christian Brecher, Manfred Weck
Chapter 11. Design Examples of Selected Machine Tools
Abstract
The previous chapters have already dealt with an extremely wide range of machine tools and their functionalities. This chapter discusses three specific examples and provides an insight into the practical implementation of the design and structure of machine tools. The machine tools introduced include a Starrag Technology GmbH machining center, an Elb-Schliff Werkzeugmaschinen GmbH grinding machine, and an INDEX GmbH & Co. KG lathe.
Christian Brecher, Manfred Weck
Backmatter
Metadata
Title
Machine Tools Production Systems 1
Authors
Christian Brecher
Manfred Weck
Copyright Year
2024
Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Electronic ISBN
978-3-662-68120-6
Print ISBN
978-3-662-68119-0
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-662-68120-6

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