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2023 | Book

Managing Complexity Through Social Intelligence

Foundations of the Modern Organic Corporatist State

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About this book

This book presents solutions to problems that are total and based on thinking about how and why humans have organized themselves. It discusses how to avoid the now well-documented Holocene Extinction, propelled by climate change, wars, resource depletion, desertification, degrading knowledge quality, famine, and deterioration of societies overall. It explains why we cannot respond effectively with hedonistic, incompetent, corrupt, and anarchistic "liberal democracy" and why neither personality cult regimes can suffice.
The book offers a model of an organic social structure embodying a collective consciousness of communitarianism and Platonic-style ethos. Putting an emphasis on the re-establishment of Classical Greek virtue, it offers solutions to resolve identity politics, alienation, and meritocracy. While doing so, the author opposes the "everyone is equal" ideology to govern the section of policymakers, instead circumscribing "rights" in terms of responsibilities, prioritizing education and training to carry forth the ethos of valuing truth above materialism, and developing Durkheim's social brain via a new discipline, "sociointelligence". The book goes on to explain how underpinning these elements is a comprehensive elucidation of often misunderstood words like "liberty", "freedom", "authoritarianism", and "democracy". All of these areas are arranged and combined in uniquely describing the organic society the author deems necessary to avoid human extinction. As a result, the book presents a “new organicity”, where the emerging transhumanism seeks to transcend hydrocarbon-based life with humanly-constructed life.
This book will appeal to students, researchers, and scholars of political science, philosophy, and the social sciences interested in a better understanding of complexity, democratic theory, Holocene Extinction, organic thinking, and meritocratic societies.

Table of Contents

Frontmatter
Chapter 1. Introduction
Abstract
This chapter, Introduction, provides an overview of Managing Complexity Through sociointelligence, a new academic discipline established by the author. Initiating the book is a call to meet the challenges of the oncoming Holocene Extinction. To now, the past social systems and their ideologies have not been successful, especially “liberal democracy” because of its hedonism and anarchy. A brief chapter-by-chapter description follows, from describing the problems and how they came about through developing an organic social response via the State, and finally imparting to it the ethos of loving truth and internalizing it through virtue. Covered are chapters on solution requirements, the foundations of order, subsequent systems, and societies as systems acquiring life. The concluding chapters present a solution framework and specific response to the Holocene Extinction. Appendix A is a miniature encyclopedia of commonly used terms, such as “left-wing,” “conservative,” and “liberal.” Appendix B outlines a political science program.
Jeremy Horne
Chapter 2. What Is Promoting Human Extinction?
Abstract
This chapter describes selected main events threatening human civilization. Some are more subtle than others, such as identity politics and culture, compared to global warming and the population explosion. Overall, experts in various fields agree, mounting complexity, incompetence, and population stress are primary drivers of environmental degradation, resource depletion, and increasingly frequent and violent conflict. Each of these has devastating effects, as well. Each problem is directly or indirectly interrelated to the others, but all stem from destructive competition and a socioeconomic order predicated upon growth and production. Hedonism and material gratification are the principal motivations.
Jeremy Horne
Chapter 3. Responses to Social Problems
Abstract
Major social systems are described in this chapter, such as socialism, communism, fascism, and Nazism, all under “isms.” Other, signifying levels of power are the “ocracies,” like monarchy, plutocracy, and democracy. Aristotle in his Politics recounted the political recursion of extreme democracy, revolution, oligarchy/dictatorship, and democracy, again, our contemporary cycle, with the familiar details: poverty and immiseration → upheaval by violence or election to install another government or regime → temporary improvement of the peoples’ situation → corruption or oppression by the government or regime, resulting backsliding into prior conditions → poverty and immiseration. Philosophers, demagogues, academics, pundits, reformers, and ideologues present these isms and ocracies, but this chapter emphasizes that the gem of high-road social attainment by any other than the State is a pile of rocks. The current social environment with these ocracies and isms failing to reverse the course toward the Holocene is ample evidence.
Jeremy Horne
Chapter 4. How these Conditions Came to be
Abstract
This chapter states that origin is contained within effects. Everything has a becoming. Every problem and its response (ocracy and ism) stems from our own creation—our assumptions, values, and actions. Events do not happen by accident. There are processes driving them. Overall, humans have created these processes, and they are as a knife or gun used by one committing suicide. This is because of our core values and the resulting social systems. More specifically, it is the way humans are using technology, philosophies, schooling, the language, forms of association, and mental faculties that formed our current predicament. Underpinning this whole chapter, in fact, this whole book, is a call to look at our value system, or ethos. These conditions also are part of the problem; we are living in a web of circumstance, where even a tiny movement in one part can reverberate throughout and end up a catastrophe on the other side. What to do? Before anything, one needs to know what is needed in order to effect a solution.
Jeremy Horne
Chapter 5. Solution Requirements
Abstract
This chapter is a mirror image of Chap. 4. Identify what drives the problem and negate it. Since ancient times there have been wars, revolutions, crime, poverty, violence, and what not; only, today they have become more complex and consequential. At their core, ancients recognized flaws in human thinking and behavior, the core of which is the value system. While they did not know what we do today about intelligence, consciousness, and mind, they did know about virtue, doing their best at what one is capable. Each person is not equal to the next. Yet, they also knew that humans do best in harmonious societies, working cooperatively. Beyond this is the long range, not simply learning about the physical world but introspecting and considering our place in the Universe. From realizing how interdependent and integrated we are, comes the unity of opposites driving our very existence and pointing the way to solutions. Out of this unity comes the order that can be imposed upon the anarchy of the Holocene extinction.
Jeremy Horne
Chapter 6. Order: The Social Embryo
Abstract
This chapter begins with Socrates saying that the prevailing of order and regularity is good; disorder is evil. Bereft of religious meaning a raw sense of evil is entropy and nothingness, a secular hell. The “inner nature of things” propels this book, along with how they came to be. Order’s foundation is the unity of difference (a.k.a., dialectics), the most fundamental law, something existing because of what it is not—a dynamism in and of itself, assuming its inherent binary character. This singularity is Aristotle’s substratum birthing order. From order emerges increasing information density, complexity, initiated by Cartesian reductionism, dividing to understand it. Included here is its historical development (Hesiod and Lucretius) and contemporary observations (digital physics). From order comes system, from system to organism. Underpinning it all is philosophy, with ontology and epistemology, along with establishing boundaries, with concomitant problems of space and time. Minimally, two individuals form a system, a social embryo, a living entity. How the human social embryo has developed for the past thousands of years and failed to face complexity successfully drives us to question whether we have the capacity to manage it now in this most crucial time.
Jeremy Horne
Chapter 7. How Order Comes to Life
Abstract
This chapter describes “organic” and “life,” based on mainstream literature. Modern researchers doubt hydrocarbon-based self-movement is the only basis for life. It is clear we may have to re-think what life really is, especially as we look beyond this planet and into the vast regions of the universe of hundreds of trillions of solar systems very likely containing self-moving entities fulfilling all the conditions we say life has, albeit those entities that are not hydrocarbon-based. We abstract from this research about life and turn to the metaphysics of connectedness in societies and ask if societies are “living.” Overall, in light of this research, what are the implications of saying something “lives” and how does it affect our ways of regarding societies? Besides copious references to terms like “body politic” and “Mother Earth,” major thinkers have described what they see as society: a dynamic interdependent coherent set of elements acting to achieve a common goal, pretty much the definition of a dynamic system, more explicitly, organic, all with a corpus (body) and a mentation, however primitive, driving them. If doctors diagnose and treat their patients, why cannot the social doctor do the same with the organic society?
Jeremy Horne
Chapter 8. Who Says Societies Are Living?
Abstract
After giving a historical backdrop, this chapter outlines in chronological form the views of several major social and political philosophers. Included are:
  • Plato
  • Aristotle
  • Jean Jacques Rousseau
  • Henri Saint-Simon
  • Johann Caspar Bluntschli
  • Emile Durkheim
  • Auguste Comte
  • Oswald Spengler
  • Herbert Spencer
  • Thomas Hobbes
Emile Durkheim and Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel are highlighted as representing the best descriptions the ideal modern State. The chapter emphasizes that many others are left out and the list is only to give an idea of what thinking about organic societies entails. Ideological thinkers are extruded, such as the National Socialists and fascists. Asian, Latin American, and African philosophers have not been included but it is supposed a wealth of ideas exists in their domain, as well. The chapter suggests these need to be included in all political philosophy programs, and political philosophy, itself, should be a requisite in all political science curriculums.
Jeremy Horne
Chapter 9. That Special Organism: The State
Abstract
Using Georg WF Hegel and Emile Durkheim as a foundation, this chapter develops the State, and organism with a social brain capable of reversing humanity’s course towards the Holocene Extinction. Already existing is the corporation, the axial “corpus,” or body, that ultimately transformed will house a brain with social consciousness. After a brief legal and historical development of the corporation, this chapter describes how the contemporary vulgar corporation is the antithesis of the desired corpus of the State, the former the “corporation,” the latter “Corporation.” Between Rome and the present was the interplay of individuals becoming socialized within their ocracies, culminating in Hegel’s “The state is actual only when its members have a feeling of their own self-hood and it is stable only when public and private ends are identical” and Durkheim’s collective consciousness through corporations, all with the highest ethos of loving truth. This social organism then can address the problems chapter by discarding old myths and values and internalize the reality that only with a healthy body can the collective humankind can survive.
Jeremy Horne
Chapter 10. The Social Brain
Abstract
Chapter 9 established the corpus, but this chapter develops the brain. Durkheim’s “social brain” does mentation, i.e., “consciousness,” “intelligence,” “psyche,” and similar words we really cannot define adequately. Mentation calls on Howard Gardner’s multiple intelligences forming a substructure, added to which are social and ethical intelligence. Complex decisions compel equally complex but sterling mentation. Bluntly stated, average mentation is not sufficient. Social organisms have brains having multi-faceted intelligence, and to study them and transferring the finding to social decision-making is the subject of “sociointelligence,” not dissimilar in style to Wilson's sociobiology and its sequelae of university programs, and sociocybernetics. Coupled to this chapter is an accounting of how modern private and government research entities are actively engaged in not only building vast data acquisition and processing networks but trying to create artificial mentation, itself. Redirecting mentation research and applying to enhancing the highest qualities of humanity—the love or truth and virtue is a primary goal of sociointelligence. Ultimately, as an extension of transhumanism, there may emerge parallel to the supercomputer-based artificial brain a comparable social brain to meet the Holocene Extinction.
Jeremy Horne
Chapter 11. Toward A Solution: The Framework
Abstract
The chapter starts with what is required to solve the problems, outlined in Chap. 5—Solution requirements. Previous to that came the solution requirements chapter. Its foundations are intelligence, competence, virtue, high-road ethos, followed by the same style of ethics and moral code, not being dispossessed (decent well remunerated, personal identity, strong family, dignified work that is socially useful, good health—physical and mental—and willingness to participate—social responsibility). To implement these, we need the State—rights, duties, and responsibilities, collective consciousness as a basis of social integrity, philosophy over ideology, excellent school system to train and educate, checks and balances, and a new social/political science program with sociointelligence.
Jeremy Horne
Chapter 12. Towards a Solution: The Responses
Abstract
Each problem is met by a solution outlined within the framework of this book, and this chapter provides some detailed examples. Everyone becomes a part of the solution, their being the State and coordinated by it. A complete overhaul of the political structure is through corporations, and the replacement of the Constitution by a document setting forth not only the structure but the philosophy, including rights existing because of responsibilities. “Meritocracy,” “virtue,” and “truth” are guide words. Neither individual or the State is flawless; so comes a system of checks and balances through the autonomous and quasi-public Citizens Accountability Corporation, a 24/7/365 audit organization reporting to the Corporatist Assembly. Further individual integration into society is through the national service corps—both youth and adult, the former similar to the Girls/Boys Clubs, the latter Americorps. Particular issues include universal health care, quality training/education for all, dignified well-remunerated work, sound and modern infrastructure, a world-cooperative foreign policy (as opposed to the current imperialism), outlawing speculation, encouraging a free press (as one of the checks against social abuse), and, overall, the social (State and cooperatives) ownership and control of the means of production of goods and services. For ourselves, transhumanism offers opportunities to overcoming physical afflictions.
Jeremy Horne
Chapter 13. Conclusions
Abstract
Summary and Conclusions in somewhat of a standard way collects all of what has been said thus far and says indeed how the title of this book Managing Complexity Through Social Intelligence: The foundations of the modern corporatist state has been fulfilled. Critical problems abound, and if not solved, will guarantee humanity’s demise. The problems chapter presented a brief outline. The solution scope is totalitarian; if one node of the vast interdependent web of society is not addressed, the rest is compromised, perhaps fatally. Handmaidens to realizing the State are the new political science with its sociointelligence and a developing shadow State, analogous to a proof of concept. To bring it about requires the reader looking intently at the last page of this book, “You”—The unfinished book.
Jeremy Horne
Backmatter
Metadata
Title
Managing Complexity Through Social Intelligence
Author
Jeremy Horne
Copyright Year
2023
Electronic ISBN
978-3-031-25444-4
Print ISBN
978-3-031-25443-7
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-031-25444-4