Skip to main content
main-content
Top

Hint

Swipe to navigate through the articles of this issue

29-03-2019 | Issue 1/2020

Empirical Economics 1/2020

Medical providers as double agents in a universal health care system: evidence from generic pharmaceutical adoption in Taiwan

Journal:
Empirical Economics > Issue 1/2020
Authors:
Meng-Chi Tang, Yi-Nong Wu
Important notes
We thank Charlie Chern, Ya-Ming Liu, Ji-Liang Shiu, and the seminar participants at the iHEA 9th World Congress and Feng Chia University for providing various comments on and suggestions to an early draft of this paper. Ya-Chi Wang, Jei-Ying Wei, and Yu-An Tsao provided research assistance for this paper. We are indebted to Heng-Sim Lee, Head of Pharmacy Division of the Chiayi Branch, Taichung Veterans General Hospital for providing institutional details on various aspects of generic pharmaceutical adoption and the institutional details of hospitals and clinics in Taiwan. The financial support from the National Science Council, Taiwan, is greatly appreciated (NSC101-2410-H-194-018-). This study is based in part on data from the National Health Insurance Research Database provided by the Bureau of National Health Insurance, Department of Health and managed by National Health Research Institutes. The interpretation and conclusions contained herein do not represent those of Bureau of National Health Insurance, Department of Health or National Health Research Institutes. All errors are our own.

Publisher's Note

Springer Nature remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations.

Abstract

This paper investigates medical providers’ generic pharmaceutical adoption in Taiwan, stresses that this decision involves the interests of providers, patients and insurance payer. We examine this prescription behavior using Taiwanese data because patients and physicians did not self-select their insurance plans under a universal health care system. Physicians in Taiwan also respond to strong financial incentives because they are allowed to both prescribe and dispense drugs. The empirical results show that a larger price difference between brand-name and generic drugs increases physicians’ likelihood for prescribing generic prescriptions. However, this effect decreases as the payer’s cost share percentage increases. This study also demonstrates that some physicians prescribed more generic drugs than the others, including the hospital and clinic owners, and the ones practicing in clinics and private institutions.

Please log in to get access to this content

To get access to this content you need the following product:

Springer Professional "Wirtschaft"

Online-Abonnement

Mit Springer Professional "Wirtschaft" erhalten Sie Zugriff auf:

  • über 58.000 Bücher
  • über 300 Zeitschriften

aus folgenden Fachgebieten:

  • Bauwesen + Immobilien
  • Business IT + Informatik
  • Finance + Banking
  • Management + Führung
  • Marketing + Vertrieb
  • Versicherung + Risiko




Testen Sie jetzt 30 Tage kostenlos.

Springer Professional "Wirtschaft+Technik"

Online-Abonnement

Mit Springer Professional "Wirtschaft+Technik" erhalten Sie Zugriff auf:

  • über 69.000 Bücher
  • über 500 Zeitschriften

aus folgenden Fachgebieten:

  • Automobil + Motoren
  • Bauwesen + Immobilien
  • Business IT + Informatik
  • Elektrotechnik + Elektronik
  • Energie + Umwelt
  • Finance + Banking
  • Management + Führung
  • Marketing + Vertrieb
  • Maschinenbau + Werkstoffe
  • Versicherung + Risiko

Testen Sie jetzt 30 Tage kostenlos.

Literature
About this article

Other articles of this Issue 1/2020

Empirical Economics 1/2020 Go to the issue

Premium Partner

    Image Credits