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24-11-2022 | Open Forum

Narrative autonomy and artificial storytelling

Author: Silvia Pierosara

Published in: AI & SOCIETY

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Abstract

This article tries to shed light on the difference between human autonomy and AI-driven machine autonomy. The breadth of the studies concerning this topic is constantly increasing, and for this reason, this discussion is very narrow and limited in its extent. Indeed, its hypothesis is that it is possible to distinguish two kinds of autonomy by analysing the way humans and robots narrate stories and the types of stories that, respectively, result from their capability of narrating stories on their own. To approach the question of autonomy and its different interpretations in robots and humans, using narratives and stories as a lens, I proceed through four steps. First, I provide a brief summary concerning the state of the art with regard to issues concerning autonomy and AI. Second, I focus on specific issues concerning AI that are applied to storytelling. Third, I progressively approach narrative autonomy through what could seem a useless digression by addressing the problem of human creativity in relation to machine creativity. Fourth, I hypothesize a radical difference between narrative autonomy—which is proper to humans—and storytelling capability, which can be observed in both humans and machines.
Footnotes
1
Two of the most recent and telling examples of storytelling robots are the TV-series Storybots and Cody the Storytelling Robot.
 
2
Romele too refers to this dialogue, held in 1985, between the two (Romele 2020, pp. 91–92).
 
3
Some scholars noted that “gamification” is nowadays pervasive: it ranges from “free time” to education and identity construction. “Gamification” can be defined as “the use of game design elements in non-game contexts” (Deterding et al. 2011, p. 1).
 
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Metadata
Title
Narrative autonomy and artificial storytelling
Author
Silvia Pierosara
Publication date
24-11-2022
Publisher
Springer London
Published in
AI & SOCIETY
Print ISSN: 0951-5666
Electronic ISSN: 1435-5655
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/s00146-022-01595-9

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