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About this book

This book, based on extensive international collaborative research, highlights the state-of-the-art design of smart living for metropolises, megacities, and metacities, as well as at the community and neighbourhood level. Smart living is one of six main components of smart cities, the others being smart people, smart economy, smart environment, smart mobility and smart governance. Smart living in any smart city can only be designed and implemented with active roles for smart people and smart city government, and as a joint effort combining e-Democracy, e-Governance and ICT-IoT systems. In addition to using information and communication technologies, the Internet of Things, Internet of Governance (e-Governance) and Internet of People (e-Democracy), the design of smart living utilizes various domain-specific tools to achieve coordinated, effective and efficient management, development, and conservation, and to improve ecological, social, biophysical, psychological and economic well-being in an equitable manner without compromising the sustainability of development ecosystems and stakeholders. This book presents case studies covering more than 10 cities and centred on domain-specific smart living components. The book is issued in two volumes and this volume focus on community studies and ways and means.

Table of Contents

Frontmatter

Introduction

Frontmatter

Smart Living for Smart Cities

Abstract
Smart living is one of six components of a smart city. Other five are smart people, smart mobility, smart economy, smart environment, and smart government. All smart living activities have also these six components integrated with smart city system. Cities have their own characteristics based on the size whether it is a metropolis, megacity, meta city or small or very big continental settlement. This is based on its unique cultural system and ecological system. All aspects of living in a city can be traced to one major aspect which considerably influences daily life. It can be religion, for example, Islam in Saudi Arabia, Buddhism in Tibet, Judaism in Israel or Christianity in Vatican or it can be a dominant aspect of life which the cultural system has thrived to develop in the past such as for example health as indicated by high performance of related time series statistics and so on. Then the concept of smart is presented illustrating with the smart home which differs greatly with the smart aspect of the city. The design of smart living for smart cities can be centred around this dominant aspect which I call domain and some of the essential features of such domain is briefly presented in this chapter. The chapter then focuses on design for smart living in for smart cities based on a domain approach, IOT and ICT system design for smart living, and design of E-Democracy and E-Governance system for a smart living for smart cities. This will provide for a total design for smart living in a smart city. This is briefly presented in this chapter.
T. M. Vinod Kumar

Community Studies

Frontmatter

Urban Transformation for Sustainable Growth and Smart Living: The Case of the Atlanta Beltline

Abstract
The Beltline project in Atlanta combines elements of urban greenway planning, parks and recreation, pedestrian and bike friendly trails, public transit, and other facilities connecting over 40 neighborhoods. This is bringing about transformative urban regeneration in those neighborhoods, with large-scale economic investments and growth in previously neglected areas and brownfields. The Beltline has generated considerable interest among urban scholars. However, most studies have focused on specific aspects of the Beltline development in detail. This study uses extensive literature review and analyzes census data while taking a comprehensive look at the following smart living perspectives: urban health and wellbeing, smart public transportation, economic development and brownfields, and managing affordable housing during neighborhood change. While the Beltline has brought about considerable growth and investment, and created city level green spaces and trails, the process has been accompanied by gentrification and displacement that has disproportionately affected the racial minorities and poor neighborhoods.
Sweta Byahut, Sudeshna Ghosh, Calvin Masilela

Ways and Means

Frontmatter

Exploring Livability in the Era of Smart City: A Case of Bhopal

Abstract
Bhopal is strategically located in Central India and also the Capital city of the State (Province) of Madhya Pradesh. Bhopal city is known for a city of knowledge, with culturally rich communities residing over generations, and also famous for many natural and artificial lakes. Out of the 100 cities chosen under the ambitious Smart Cities Mission by the Government of India, Bhopal has been selected in the first round as one of the 20 lighthouse cities. The Smart Cities Mission aims to transform the city into a future-ready smart city with enhanced livability and sustainability. The primary objective of this research is to assess the livability condition in Bhopal city based on following the three aspects: i) smart transportation, ii) influence of smart living on urban informality, and iii) good governance, including e-Governance and citizen participation. An attempt has also been made to assess livability score in the mobility sector and to understand smart practices with digital technology in the selected slum pockets and also to investigate the relationship between the socio-economic profile of administrative wards and the overall usage of digital governance apps in Bhopal city. The present research provides many clues for policymakers to understand livability conditions and user’s perception towards promoting smart transport and governance, and that can call for a review of the smart city initiatives of Bhopal.
Amit Chatterjee, Gaurav Vaidya, N. K. Paulose, Premjeet Das Gupta

Geospatial Intelligence for Smart Living–Case of New Delhi

Abstract
The following chapter tries to pay attention to the spatial dimension of smart living projects in India. Geospatial Planning is a comparatively new terminology in the spatial planning dictionary of the Indian urban scenario, just like the terms smart planning and smart cities are. Although there is no clear delineation between smart living and smart city projects in India, characteristics of the Smart Cities Mission are in consonance with the ideologies of smart living. The chapter first tries to understand the key values underpinning the concept of smart living and delineates it through the terms interconnectedness, sustainability and mobility (both social and physical in nature). It tries to then identify how geospatial tools help manifest these values of smart living and an elaborate network of indicators is identified. This network of indicators lays the foundation for evaluating geospatial smart living projects in New Delhi.
Kusum Lata, Priyanka Kumar, Arpita Banerjee

Role of Smart Land Scape Architecture in Smart Development of the UAE

Abstract
Development of Cities are often judged by the economic condition, commercial activities and building forms. The emirates cities of UAE are known for high standard of lifestyle, safety, security and beauty. The city has expanded from a small trade center to a large commercial hub. The extreme weather of UAE gave rise to clusters of housing settlements with very less window openings that restricted direct sunlight and hot air within the habitable areas. Instead, light and air was allowed to pass through the small courtyards, corridors, sikkas, wind towers and vertical slits within the roofs of the buildings that could reduce the harshness of the climate and provide diffused light and cool air to the buildings. With the advent of technology and digitization, people’s movement got restricted and the outdoor spaces and public realm started losing their importance. UAE Government is trying to conserve the courtyards, sikkas, walkways in old city and create new parks, playgrounds, event centers in the new area. The Government is forming guidelines to reserve a percentage of open space with community and connect these spaces with the pedestrian and bikeways within and outside the developments. The recent drive to integrate all communities with the help of public realm by using land scape features and allocating various active spaces is a move towards a unique healthy urban development. The research will prove how the weightage of Public realm is more than land value land value in sustainable urban design. This chapter will describe the typologies and hierarchy of open spaces and public realm of the UAE that have regained the importance under the governance of his highness and developed innovative ways to recreate and integrate with new activities supporting the urban fabric.
Ashmita Karmakar, Ashikha Raoof

Conclusion

Frontmatter

International Collaborative Research: “Smart Living for Smart Cities” and Conclusions of Cities Case Studies

Abstract
This chapter has two parts. In the first part, the organizational details of the international research collaborative project “Smart Living for Smart Cities” is discussed. In the second part are presented in consultation with the team leaders of the city study, their general conclusions of the study.
T. M. Vinod Kumar
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