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21-01-2019 | Original Paper

Taking Fact-Checks Literally But Not Seriously? The Effects of Journalistic Fact-Checking on Factual Beliefs and Candidate Favorability

Journal:
Political Behavior
Authors:
Brendan Nyhan, Ethan Porter, Jason Reifler, Thomas J. Wood
Important notes

Electronic supplementary material

The online version of this article (https://​doi.​org/​10.​1007/​s11109-019-09528-x) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
We thank Kim Gross, John Pfaff, and D.J. Flynn for comments and Kyle Dropp for fielding Study 1. This research received funding support from the European Research Council (ERC) under the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation program (Grant Agreement No. 682758). We also received support from the School of Media and Public Affairs at George Washington University. All errors are our own.

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Abstract

Are citizens willing to accept journalistic fact-checks of misleading claims from candidates they support and to update their attitudes about those candidates? Previous studies have reached conflicting conclusions about the effects of exposure to counter-attitudinal information. As fact-checking has become more prominent, it is therefore worth examining how respondents respond to fact-checks of politicians—a question with important implications for understanding the effects of this journalistic format on elections. We present results to two experiments conducted during the 2016 campaign that test the effects of exposure to realistic journalistic fact-checks of claims made by Donald Trump during his convention speech and a general election debate. These messages improved the accuracy of respondents’ factual beliefs, even among his supporters, but had no measurable effect on attitudes toward Trump. These results suggest that journalistic fact-checks can reduce misperceptions but often have minimal effects on candidate evaluations or vote choice.

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Supplementary Material
Electronic supplementary material 1 (TEX 106 kb)
11109_2019_9528_MOESM1_ESM.tex
Electronic supplementary material 2 (PDF 132 kb)
11109_2019_9528_MOESM2_ESM.pdf
Literature
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