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Journal

The International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment

The International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment OnlineFirst articles

03-03-2021 | LCA FOR AGRICULTURE

Multifunctional modelling in the life cycle assessment of honey considering pollination

The United Nations 2030 Agenda (UN, 2016 ) has clearly defined the need for a transition towards sustainable development. Amongst the various Goals set by the Agenda, Goal 15 undoubtedly stressed the protection, restoration and sustainable use of …

01-03-2021 | LCA FOR MANUFACTURING AND NANOTECHNOLOGY

A comparative LCA as a tool for evaluating existing best available techniques (BATs) in facing brick manufacturing and more eco-sustainable coating solutions

Facing bricks are ceramic components present in external walls of building structures. They are part of so-called structural ceramics and generally grouped into the bricks and roof tiles sector (BAT 2007 ; Hashmi 2014 ). Such bricks consist in …

22-02-2021 | NON-TOXIC IMPACT CATEGORIES ASSOCIATED WITH EMISSIONS TO AIR, WATER, SOIL

Freshwater eutrophication: spatially explicit fate factors for nitrogen and phosphorus emissions at the global scale

Life cycle assessment (LCA) is a standardised and comprehensive method to quantitatively assess the environmental impact of goods or services throughout its entire life cycle (Hellweg and Milà i Canals 2014 , ISO 14040 and ISO 14044 ). The use of …

21-02-2021 | REGIONAL TOPICS FROM LATIN AMERICA

Reducing the carbon and water footprints of Brazilian green coconut

Coconut ( Cocos nucífera , L ) is cultivated in several countries and in all five continents. In 2017, the world coconut production comprised 12,303,924 harvested hectares and 60,773,436 tons of coconut (FAO 2019 ). In recent years, the production …

15-02-2021 | UNCERTAINTIES IN LCA

Integrating life cycle assessment (LCA) and quantitative risk assessment (QRA) to address model uncertainties: defining a landfill reference case under varying environmental and engineering conditions

Life cycle assessment (LCA) is the commonly used tool to assess the environmental impacts of a product or service over its whole life cycle (ISO 14040-14043). It has increasingly been used in the impact assessment of solid waste management (SWM) …

Current Publications

About this journal

The International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment (Int J Life Cycle Assess) is the first journal devoted entirely to Life Cycle Assessment and closely related methods. LCA has become a recognized instrument to assess the ecological burdens and impacts throughout the consecutive and interlinked stages of a product system, from raw material acquisition or generation from natural resources, through production and use to final disposal. The Int J Life Cycle Assess is a forum for scientists developing LCA and LCM (Life Cycle Management); LCA and LCM practitioners; managers concerned with environmental aspects of products; governmental environmental agencies responsible for product quality; scientific and industrial societies involved in LCA development, and ecological institutions and bodies.

Papers on applied LCA/LCM, especially case studies, will be considered for publication if they are of general interest to the LCA/LCM community and present new insight or knowledge, such as a product that has been rarely or never assessed; a special interest operation, e.g. hydrofracking or Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS); novel methodology; or located in a non-mainstream region. In addition to LCA/LCM, papers on Life Cycle Sustainability Assessment (LCSA) and Social Life Cycle Assessment (SLCA) are also welcome. Life Cycle Costing (LCC) studies are considered for publication in the framework of LCSA (three pillar concept/triple bottom line).

Papers on the application of life cycle assessment methodology in single issue studies, such as greenhouse gas analysis as a means to assess carbon footprint, climate change, or global warming potential, will also be considered if the conclusions are clearly limited to the studied impacts. Discussion must indicate the limitations of not conducting a “full” LCA that accounts for all environmentally relevant impacts (i.e., the potential trade-offs).

Additional information