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About this book

The Politics of Mobile Citizenship in Europe explores contemporary models of national and European Union (EU) citizenship in the context of intra-EU mobility. Scholars have often addressed these models from separate disciplinary standpoints. National citizenship has been studied through the prism of citizenship studies and EU citizenship from an EU studies viewpoint. To contribute to their ongoing discussion and offer a politically embedded perspective, Siklodi applies the citizenship studies lens to the analysis of EU-wide survey data and original focus group evidence of young and highly educated EU mobiles and stayers in Sweden and Britain. Specifically, she investigates political community building processes, including processes of differentiation and exclusion, and the dimensions of citizenship – identity, rights and participation – at the national and EU levels. Siklodi proposes a redefinition of the active/passive citizen dichotomy in terms of mobiles/stayers to provide a more accurate description of contemporary citizen attitudes and behaviours across the European community.

Table of Contents

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. Introduction: The Politics of Contemporary Citizenship: What’s Going On?

Abstract
This chapter introduces contemporary mobile citizenship in Europe and provides a rationale for in-depth academic investigation of this issue from a citizenship studies perspective. The chapter reflects upon some of the key citizenship and mobility developments in the European Union, with a specific focus on the United Kingdom and Sweden and presents a short overview of the relevant theoretical approaches from citizenship and EU studies prisms. The chapter ends with a note on the key research questions and the methods adopted in the study presented by the book and a summary of the key themes discussed in the rest of the book.
Nora Siklodi

Chapter 2. Citizenship, Free Movement and the EU

Abstract
This chapter makes a case for re-embedding the study of mobile European citizenship in the field of citizenship studies. In particular, the chapter considers the prevalence of the three key themes as apparent in citizenship studies debates, including the changing significance of distinct models of citizenship, related community building processes (including processes of differentiation and exclusion) and the dimensions of citizenship, namely identity, rights and participation. It applies these themes to the Swedish, UK and EU examples before turning to the anticipated role of intra-EU mobility, especially learning mobility in EU citizenship. The chapter ends with a conceptual framework about the dimensions of citizenship, which is used for the analysis of data in the remainder of the book.
Nora Siklodi

Chapter 3. A Snapshot of Mobile Citizenship in the EU

Abstract
This chapter is the first attempt made in this book to empirically re-embed the study of contemporary models of citizenship in Europe in the broader field of citizenship studies, using secondary analysis of Eurobarometer data (EB 89.1 2018). The chapter demonstrates current national and European Union (EU) attitudes along the key dimensions of citizenship—identity, rights and participation—and draws out the similarities and differences between them on the basis of mobility experiences. Controls for migration experiences and attitudes as well as socio-economic factors, especially age and education level, are then used to explain some of the emerging disparities in citizens’ national and EU-level attitudes.
Nora Siklodi

Chapter 4. Community Building Processes and EU Mobility

Abstract
Drawing on original focus group evidence with young and highly educated citizens, this chapter inspects closely one of the key themes of the book—community building processes in Europe, including processes of differentiation between European Union (EU) nationals and processes of exclusion affecting the non-EU “other”. Each process is investigated in the light of their apparent relationship with the three dimensions of citizenship, accentuating related changes along the mobile/stayer distinctions. Zooming into processes of differentiation, further divisions are also drawn within mobile/stayer communities. However, processes of exclusion emerge as blurred in the context of the EU’s own, globalised higher education arena. The chapter makes a strong case for redefining the active/passive national and EU citizen categories along the mobile/stayer dichotomy.
Nora Siklodi

Chapter 5. National Citizenship in a Mobile Europe: They Are Changing!

Abstract
This chapter emphasises that mobility within the European Union (EU) can and likely to transform the perceptions of young citizens about their national citizenship. Most importantly, the original focus group evidence with young and highly educated citizens suggests that EU mobility reinforces the significance of inclusive national frames for notions of citizenship and turn some of the banal aspects of the dimensions of national citizenship more tangible. By comparison, stayers are likely to take it for granted that local and national policies dominate their everyday lives, transposing this knowledge to make sense of EU politics—in the one-off cases it was deemed as relevant. The chapter thus cautions against adopting overly progressive anticipations for the characteristics of mobile national citizenship.
Nora Siklodi

Chapter 6. EU Citizenship and Mobility: A Less Than Perfect Partnership

Abstract
This chapter provides a close empirical study of senses of mobile European Union (EU) citizenship using original focus group evidence with young and highly educated citizens. The chapter illustrates that in the best-case scenario—in Sweden—EU citizenship is seen as something for the future. Its current model as apparent today is often deemed as inherently exclusive, fragmented and temporary. EU citizenship seems only relevant to a small group of potential citizens who can already afford to move. Even then, it prevails while citizens are moving but only within certain contexts—preferably in Eurosceptic national contexts—while it is likely to lose its significance once EU citizens settle in the host country or return home. These conditions seem to render EU participation not only non-existent but perhaps even irrelevant.
Nora Siklodi

Chapter 7. Conclusion: Where Is Mobile Citizenship in Europe—And Elsewhere—Heading?

Abstract
This chapter provides an overall assessment of contemporary politics of mobile citizenship in Europe, paying particular attention to some of the more nuanced findings of the study that were presented in the various chapters of this book. Specifically, the chapter reinforces the benefits of adopting a citizenship studies framework to addressing contemporary mobile citizenship practices in the European Union (EU), with a particular focus on the implications of the revised dichotomy of active/passive citizens along the mobile/stayer distinctions for national and transnational community building processes. The chapter also tends to and considers at length the genuine prospects EU citizenship offers, as apparent today. Both developments are found to provide exciting new research opportunities for interested academics and have broader policy relevance which might be of interest to politicians seeking to address the issue of mobile citizenship within and beyond Europe.
Nora Siklodi

Backmatter

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