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2019 | OriginalPaper | Chapter

9. The Resistance Economy: Iranian Patriotism and Economic Liberalisation

Authors: Erzsébet N. Rózsa, Tamás Szigetvári

Published in: Market Liberalism and Economic Patriotism in the Capitalist World-System

Publisher: Springer International Publishing

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Abstract

The Islamic Republic of Iran is a unique case in the global economic system. The new experimental model initiated by and established after the Islamic revolution in 1979 was based on the concept of total independence from foreign influence, including economic independence. In recent years, Iranian politics was characterised by a more liberal approach, trying to relink the country to the global economy. This study focuses on the current Iranian liberalisation process, the debates concerning the threats and opportunities of liberalisation, and the country’s mixed approach towards foreign capital inflow, and its integration into the global economy with limited liberalisation and strong economic patriotism.
Footnotes
1
Chapter 2 of this volume.
 
2
The Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region includes the Arab countries, Israel, Iran, and Turkey.
 
3
The Cambridge History of Islam, volume 1B, pp. 595–626.
 
4
For example, the prohibition of inflicting harm or losses upon others, monopoly, hoarding, usury, and other illegitimate and evil practices, as well as the prohibition of extravagance and wastefulness in all matters related to the economy, including consumption, investment, production, distribution, and services.
 
5
The major foreign partners of the Iranian automobile industry are the French manufacturers Groupe PSA (Peugeot Citroen) and Renault, the Japanese firm Suzuki, and, more recently, the German company Daimler AG.
 
6
Overseas capital of Iranian origin is estimated at more than $1 trillion, with $200 billion in Dubai alone (IBP 2016, p. 258).
 
7
See, for example, Hirschmann (1968).
 
8
See various works by Amin, Cardoso, Emmanuel, and Wallerstein.
 
10
See, for example, Xing (1999).
 
Literature
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Metadata
Title
The Resistance Economy: Iranian Patriotism and Economic Liberalisation
Authors
Erzsébet N. Rózsa
Tamás Szigetvári
Copyright Year
2019
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-05186-0_9

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