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About this book

This short book provides an update on various methods for incorporating phase changing materials (PCMs) into building structures. It discusses previous research into optimizing the integration of PCMs into surrounding walls (gypsum board and interior plaster products), trombe walls, ceramic floor tiles, concrete elements (walls and pavements), windows, concrete and brick masonry, underfloor heating, ceilings, thermal insulation and furniture an indoor appliances.

Based on the phase change state, PCMs fall into three groups: solid–solid PCMs, solid–liquid PCMs and liquid–gas PCMs. Of these the solid–liquid PCMs, which include organic PCMs, inorganic PCMs and eutectics, are suitable for thermal energy storage.

The process of selecting an appropriate PCM is extremely complex, but crucial for thermal energy storage. The potential PCM should have a suitable melting temperature, and the desirable heat of fusion and thermal conductivity specified by the practical application. Thus, the methods of measuring the thermal properties of PCMs are key.

With suitable PCMs and the correct incorporation method, latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) can be economically efficient for heating and cooling buildings. However, several problems need to be tackled before LHTES can reliably and practically be applied.

Table of Contents

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. Introduction

Abstract
A PCM is a substance composed for molecules. The principle of the PCM is simple. As the temperature increases, the material changes phase from solid to liquid. The reaction being endothermic, the PCM absorbs the heat.
João M. P. Q. Delgado, Joana C. Martinho, Ana Vaz Sá, Ana S. Guimarães, Vitor Abrantes

Chapter 2. Impregnation of PCMs in Building Materials

Abstract
PCMs utilize the principle of latent heat thermal storage (LHTS) to absorb energy in large quantities when there is a surplus and releasing it when there is a deficit. Correct use of PCMs can reduce peak heating and cooling loads, i.e. reduce energy usage, and may also allow for smaller dimensions of technical equipment for heating and cooling.
João M. P. Q. Delgado, Joana C. Martinho, Ana Vaz Sá, Ana S. Guimarães, Vitor Abrantes

Chapter 3. PCM Current Applications and Thermal Performance

Abstract
The use of phase change materials (PCM) in the buildings is a possibility to achieve the reduction of energy dependency as it allows the use of latent heat storage to increase the thermal inertia without significantly increasing the building weight.
João M. P. Q. Delgado, Joana C. Martinho, Ana Vaz Sá, Ana S. Guimarães, Vitor Abrantes

Chapter 4. Conclusions

Abstract
It was carried out a review of thermal energy storage using phase change materials with focus on the building application. The information gathered is divided into the different application of PCM. From the research, it can be concluded that PCM application for passive solutions in construction materials has been studied for a couple of decades and by many academics.
João M. P. Q. Delgado, Joana C. Martinho, Ana Vaz Sá, Ana S. Guimarães, Vitor Abrantes
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