Skip to main content
main-content

Über dieses Buch

This book explores the sea change in thinking about how to educate students of entrepreneurship, uses extant theory to develop a conceptual model of entrepreneurship skill development, describes an assessment tool for operationalizing this model, discusses how this tool can be utilized to develop entrepreneurship skills, and offers examples from the application of our approach in educational settings. It concludes with implications of this methodology for furthering both entrepreneurship education and the research that shapes it. The authors present an entrepreneurship skills assessment tool, which uses a theory of measurement that breaks from psychometrics (predictive approaches) and honors the volatility and uncertainty that characterizes entrepreneurship. This assessment tool can be used to integrate curriculum and co-curricular activities to ensure skill development. Focusing on a methodology for the measurement and development of entrepreneurship skills, this book will serve as a valuable resource to researchers and students alike.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. The Paradigm Shift in Entrepreneurship Education

Abstract
This chapter discusses major recent changes in the way we think about entrepreneurs and how they are developed. It begins with the idea that entrepreneurs are born, not made, and how that theory influenced entrepreneurship education and policy, until it was largely debunked through research, shifting thinking toward the development of entrepreneurs. Along the way, entrepreneurship educators moved away from business plans and planning processes toward customer discovery and business modeling. Entrepreneurship is now thought of as a method, requiring a skill set to be executed successfully.
Thomas S. Lyons, John S. Lyons, Julie A. Samson

Chapter 2. An Appropriate Response: A Skills Development Framework

Abstract
In this chapter, we lay out a conceptual framework for a skill development perspective to entrepreneurship development. We argue that entrepreneurship development should be considered a transformational offering that requires mass customization. Developing entrepreneurs necessitate a skills-based complex system. For this purpose, we describe a conceptual framework for managing such a system called Transformational Collaborative Outcomes Management (TCOM), which comes from the helping professions, particularly behavioral health. We elaborate its five-stage process—access, assessment and engagement, intervention planning and delivery, monitoring and adapting, coordination and care management, and transitioning—and adapt this to the entrepreneurship development process.
Thomas S. Lyons, John S. Lyons, Julie A. Samson

Chapter 3. The RISE of a Clinical Approach to Skills Assessment

Abstract
Entrepreneur development programs have many choices in terms of how they might elect to measure skills. However, any program that conceptualizes entrepreneurship as a set of skills must make this decision. In order to remain consistent with the TCOM framework and create an efficient and collaborative assessment process, we have created the Readiness Inventory for Successful Entrepreneurship (RISE).To achieve the aspirations of TCOM we have used the communimetric measurement theory. In this chapter we describe this theory and contrast it to traditional theories of measurement. We then describe the development, structure and uses of the RISE.
Thomas S. Lyons, John S. Lyons, Julie A. Samson

Chapter 4. Applying the Skills Assessment to Entrepreneurship Education

Abstract
In this chapter, we will take up the application of the clinical assessment tool called the RISE to the education of students of entrepreneurship. We will pick up on the discussion of the current model of entrepreneurship education begun in Chapter 1, exploring learning theory, both curriculum and co-curricular activities, and where the RISE might fit into this flow. We will look at the application of outcomes management principles to skill building efforts in entrepreneurship education. Finally, we will examine how the RISE has been modified and extended over the course of its development and the implications of this for its use in the entrepreneurship education arena.
Thomas S. Lyons, John S. Lyons, Julie A. Samson

Chapter 5. The Case of Santa Barbara City College

Abstract
This chapter discusses the use of the RISE by the Scheinfeld Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation at Santa Barbara City College. It describes the Center’s mission, vision, programming, student body, and facilities. The Center has been using the RISE assessment in its Get REAL Accelerator program and in its Scheinfeld Interns Program. The chapter shares how the assessment was implemented and provides quantitative and qualitative measures of the outcomes. In addition, it discusses the use of the RISE in the Introduction to Entrepreneurship course, which brought the assessment into the curriculum, familiarizing students with the tool and its capability for enhancing their educational experience, creating a pipeline of students who can take full advantage of this capability through the programs of the Center.
Thomas S. Lyons, John S. Lyons, Julie A. Samson

Chapter 6. The Case of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Abstract
The Entrepreneurship Program in the Gary W. Rollins College of Business at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga is using the RISE to help it implement a strategy that focuses on building the entrepreneurship skills of its students. It is taking its long-standing curriculum and closely integrating it with the co-curricular activities of its new Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship. The result is an interesting set of unique practices that reinforce the knowledge imparted in the classroom in a way that strategically facilitates skill building.
Thomas S. Lyons, John S. Lyons, Julie A. Samson

Chapter 7. Implementing a Skills-Based Curriculum with an Outcomes Management Framework

Abstract
In this chapter, we discuss two major pathways forward: (1) the support of entrepreneurship development programs’ ability to provide a skill development curriculum and learning experiences and (2) encouraging the use of transformational management strategies to enhance the effectiveness of these programs. We describe the RISE and its features as an online platform available to all, and we encourage a collaborative approach to entrepreneurship development across programs using the TCOM conceptual framework. Our message is one of cooperation, with an emphasis on the kind of equitable treatment of entrepreneurs and students of entrepreneurship that our communimetric approach to skills measurement permits.
Thomas S. Lyons, John S. Lyons, Julie A. Samson

Backmatter

Weitere Informationen

Premium Partner

    Bildnachweise