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Über dieses Buch

Facilities Management Handbook was written from practical experience to con­ solidate, under one cover, all the necessary information at an adequate depth to guide you effectively through the intricacies of a project that may begin with site search, progress through leasing, new building construction or remodeling, and on to oc­ cupancy. This is not a theoretical exposition, but instead is a practical approach based on 30 years experience with every aspect of the material covered. These methods and concepts have been successfully used in actual situations. The book's purpose is to bring together, in one handy volume, information usually found in separate, specialized, technical publications, in an easy-to-read style readily comprehensible and usable by both technical and nontechnical people. It was written to serve anyone responsible for building design and construction, facilities manage­ ment and operations, and real estate leasing; particularly building owners and managers, industrial, commercial, and institutional facilities department personnel, plant engineering, and real estate departments. It could also be valuable to students and others planning careers in these fields. The book provides necessary information to assist sales personnel handling products and services serving the need of the above.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

1. Site Search and Selection

Abstract
There comes a time in the life of a company or corporation when site search and selection is necessary. For some companies this is a routine occurrence, and it is done on a regular basis using qualified and experienced personnel. For others, this may happen once in a life time, and the company may have no concept where to begin or how to proceed. The vast majority of companies fall in between these two extremes. Considering the broad range of skills avilable within the various companies, the problem of site search and selection is further complicated by the people with available sites. This is evidenced by the extensive advertising by the smallest communities to the largest cities, from small industrial/commercial park developers to huge new city complexes, by speculative builders, regional planners, realtors, and professional firms that specialize in planning for and conducting the site search. The inducement offered to the prospective client companies is as varied as is the type and location of the sites.
John Molnar

2. Leasing Considerations

Abstract
Many corporations are well aware of the importance of real estate leasing, so much so that frequently vice-presidents are assigned the responsibility of heading-up the real estate department. Some corporations utilize an independent division or company, headed by a president, to handle this function. For every major corporation that is adequately staffed with qualified and experienced professionals, there are thousands of smaller companies that lack this expertise. But these people can execute successful leasing arrangements if they follow a simple step-by-step procedure that their experienced counterparts use.
John Molnar

3. Comparing Rental Costs

Abstract
Before signing any lease, the several sites investigated must be evaluated. Comparing rental costs and determining which property provides the greatest amount of space for the least amount of money may well be the most difficult phase of the entire site search and leasing operation. Also, this is the stage at which you may be committing your company to a significant, long-term investment. A false move here could have a drastic effect on the company’s profit structure.
John Molnar

4. Consulting and Contracting Services

Abstract
Before the appropriate consultants and contractors can be utilized effectively, their services must be understood fully. Unfortunately, all too many facilities planners and managers do not understand the advantages of using consulting services. This is particularly true of companies with a small facilities staff. At times, even large companies with an adequate professional facilities staff do not fully utilize these services to best advantages. There are several reasons for this. Possibly the single most important reason why consulting and contracting services are not used, is because of a lack of understanding of the range of services offered. In addition, many facilities managers feel that when they perform these services, they can better interpret their own needs and have better control over the entire project. Finally, these services are not more fully utilized because many facilities planners and managers do not know at just what stage of the project the services should be retained.
John Molnar

5. Selecting Design Consultants

Abstract
One of the more difficult problems in new building construction and existing building renovation is the selection of design consultants, and the degree of difficulty is directly proportional to the technological complexity of the project. The selection process can be simplified if you have a good fundamental knowledge of the services offered by consultants, and know what you need to do to interface with them effectively. The success or failure of any project depends to a great extent upon the quality of communication between the design consultant and you, the client.
John Molnar

6. Cost Estimating Techniques

Abstract
The ability to estimate construction/installation and renovation projects is a valuable asset in building and facilities management. In addition to knowing how to estimate, it is important to know the degree of accuracy required at the various stages of the project. Further, estimates cannot be made more accurate than the degree of definition of the project. For example, at the conceptual stage, a square-foot cost will usually provide sufficient accuracy to determine the feasibility of the project. Whereas, after the contract drawings and specifications have been completed, the contractor will be able to determine the cost of the project to such accuracy that he would be willing to agree (contractually) to complete the construction and installation at a fixed price.
John Molnar

7. Remodeling Existing Buildings

Abstract
Remodeling can be a frustrating, even traumatic, experience, particularly when construction costs exceed budget and the targeted completion date slowly slips by. Yet, with the escalation of land values and inflated construction costs, more and more building owners and facilities managers are turning to remodeling. Similarly, in this highly mobile society, tenants relocate frequently. Further, constant growth creates never-ending tenant expansion and this too requires more remodeling.
John Molnar

8. Construction Administration

Abstract
One of the most important functions of the construction administration phase usually takes place soon after the construction contract is awarded and before construction starts. It is the ground-breaking ceremony. Here the owner or his representative, armed with a gold-plated shovel, breaks ground in the presence of the contractor, consultant, and, depending upon the importance of the project, local, state and/or national dignitaries. Frequently, short speeches are given by the major participants, and when the event is important enough it may receive press and/or TV coverage.
John Molnar

9. Mechanical Systems and Equipment

Abstract
This chapter will address those mechanical systems and equipment that provide for and control man’s environment in a building. It will deal with heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems, including central chiller equipment, air and water distribution systems, and terminal devices within the spaces. HVAC systems either provide heat to, or extract heat from a space, control humidity, and insure adequate or required ventilation. Depending upon the space(s) and the size of the building, this can be accomplished by any of the following:
  • Window air conditioner
  • Through-the-wall unit
  • Rooftop packaged unit
  • Central chiller plant
John Molnar

10. Electrical Systems and Equipment

Abstract
Modern buildings are totally dependent upon the continuous and uninterrupted flow of electrical current. In the event of a power failure, modern buildings soon become uninhabitable. The utility companies have made significant strides to limit the frequency and duration of power failures through a series of complex interconnect systems, and the use of sophisticated control and switching devices. Most in-building distribution systems, equipment, and devices are equally reliable. In the event of a power failure, emergency generators and uninterruptable power sources (UPS) provide temporary back-up power for essential needs. Computers will remain operational until they can be properly shut down or until a short-duration failure is corrected; in medical facilities vital services will continue; and in all modern buildings power will be provided for communications and safe egress.
John Molnar

11. Move and Occupancy

Abstract
Move and occupancy is the culmination of a project that could have started with a site search, progressed through the various design phases by an A/E firm and survived the agonies of construction. It could bring to fruition a project of four to five years duration. It could be a simple, pleasant, and rewarding experience that leaves everyone involved with a sense of accomplishment and a great deal of satisfaction. Or it could be a frustrating experience, frought with seemingly imponderable problems.
John Molnar

Backmatter

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