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Über dieses Buch

Hand-Made Television explores the ongoing enchantment of many of the much-loved stop-frame children's television programmes of 1960s and 1970s Britain. The first academic work to analyse programmes such as Pogles' Wood (1966), Clangers (1969), Bagpuss (1974) (Smallfilms) and Gordon Murray's Camberwick Green (1966), Trumpton (1967) and Chigley (1969), the book connects these series to their social and historical contexts while providing in-depth analyses of their themes and hand-made aesthetics. Hand-Made Television shows that the appeal of these programmes is rooted not only in their participatory address and evocation of a pastoral English past, but also in the connection of their stop-frame aesthetics to the actions of childhood play. This book makes a significant contribution to both Animation Studies and Television Studies; combining scholarly rigour with an accessible style, it is suitable for scholars as well as fans of these iconic British children's programmes.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Introduction

Abstract
The stop-frame animated television programmes made by Smallfilms, Gordon Murray Puppets and Film Fair have remained visible in British popular culture, handed down by grown-up children to their own little ones on DVD, and even leading to re-makes such as Clangers (2015). Svetlana Boym’s notion of modern nostalgia’ (2001) highlights a desire to return to (a fantasy of) a slower pace and a simpler time which is helpful in thinking about the ongoing appeal of the whimsical ‘hand-made’ television of the 1960s and early 1970s. There has been little scholarly attention to this body of programmes, or to stop-frame television animation more widely, despite its ongoing impact on the British children’s television which has followed it. This book aims to address this gap.
Rachel Moseley

1. Contexts

Abstract
There are three discursive contexts in which children’s stop-frame television should be situated. First is the critical, scholarly context within which the programmes addressed in this book can be positioned. Virtually absent from discussions of British television history generally, children’s television in particular and even from Animation Studies, this chapter repositions stop-frame television in a longer history of British practice stretching from the earliest days of cinema to the success of Aardman Animations. Second, the industrial context within which the programmes were produced is sketched via archival research which establishes an environment of collaboration and negotiation between the BBC and independent producers of animation. Finally, the counter-cultural mood of the 1960s forms a significant backdrop against which these programmes negotiated social change.
Rachel Moseley

2. The Pastoral Past

Abstract
Stop-frame animated children’s television of the 1960s and early 1970s constructs a palliative space of childhood play and imagination rooted in a vision of a traditional, even archaic, rural South of England. From the magical woodland settings of Smallfilms’ Pogles, through the orderly country villages of Gordon Murray’s Trumptonshire and into the gardens and parks of FilmFair’s The Herbs and The Wombles, and even the displaced, unspoiled outer-space environment of Clangers, this television leads the child viewer through real spaces in which magic still resides, orderly toy towns where everyone has their place and gradually into more urban green spaces now under threat. In these programmes, tradition and modernity co-exist in a complex and negotiated relationship.
Rachel Moseley

3. The Hand-Made

Abstract
The programmes of Smallfilms and Gordon Murray Puppets appear hand-made, crafted. The relative cultural value of ‘craft’ as opposed to art’, in conjunction with the programmes’ address to a very young audience and animated aesthetic, has positioned them as less available for critical consideration. Their ‘hand-made’ aesthetic — the visibility of the maker’s mark so critical to the discourse of craft — means thai these programmes have operated around an address based on intimacy, DIY participation and an imagined closeness to the child’s real life environment (of crafted toys and play with small things). The focus on a hand-made aesthetic is, equally, a central way in which the programmes staged their encounter with modernity and the values of their cultural moment.
Rachel Moseley

4. Magic and Movement

Abstract
Stop-frame children’s television is, fundamentally, about ‘things’ that move. The stop-frame process produces a magicality and commensurability around movement, which seems simultaneously independent and in an intimate relationship with the child’s hand at play as it jumps or slides toys around in space. In this sense, the animator’s hand stands in for the child’s, producing a closeness to the television image which is bound up in the space between the screen and the domestic setting. This relationship enables a reconsideration of ideas around telephilia, which, in contrast to cinephilia, might be conceptualised around warmth, intimacy, scale and memory. At the same time, such a relationship might produce disjunctive moments which undermine the flattened nostalgia through which these programmes have often been affectionately remembered.
Rachel Moseley

Backmatter

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