Skip to main content
main-content

Über dieses Buch

Healthy SQL is about ensuring the ongoing performance health of a SQL Server database. An unhealthy database is not just an inconvenience; it can bring a business to its knees. And if you are the database administrator, the health of your SQL Server implementation can be a direct reflection on you. It's in everyone's best interest to have a healthy SQL implementation. Healthy SQL is built around the concept of a medical checkup, giving you the tools you need to assess the current health of your database and take action to improve upon that health and maintain good performance to your business.

Healthy SQL aids in developing a rigorous routine so that you know how healthy your SQL Server machines are, and how you can keep those same servers healthy and fit for duty. The book is filled with practical advice and a time-tested strategy, helping you put together a regimen that will ensure your servers are healthy, your implementation is fully optimized, your services are redundant and highly available, and you have a plan for business continuity in the event of a disaster. If your current environment doesn't match up with these criteria, then pick up a copy of Healthy SQL today and start your journey on the road to a fit and tight SQL Server deployment.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. Introduction to Healthy SQL

Abstract
Microsoft SQL Server has become an eminent relational database management system (RDBMS) in the marketplace. The SQL Server engine has come a long way from being just another RDBMS; it’s an end-to-end business intelligence platform with built-in options for reporting; extract, transform, load (ETL); data mining; and high availability/disaster recovery (HA/DR). Its rich feature set provides a comprehensive solution for deploying, managing, monitoring, maintaining, auditing, reporting, and backing up and restoring databases; building data warehouses; and more! You will learn all about this as you journey through this book toward achieving healthy SQL.
Robert Pearl

Chapter 2. Creating a Road Map

Abstract
You will begin your journey on the road to a healthy SQL Server infrastructure with a checklist. A checklist is a simple way to organize the things you’ll need to do, both long and short term. It provides an agenda to keep you on track and is a tangible item that you can refer to and affirmatively say, “I am done with these items; only three more to go.” It is also something you can present to management and colleagues to show that you have documented your servers. Moreover, the checklist gives you clarity and purpose, allows you to focus on what needs to be done, keeps you on schedule, and acts as a motivator when you’re not sure what to do next. Follow the checklist and follow the road map that I am laying out for you here to achieve a certifiably healthy SQL Server environment.
Robert Pearl

Chapter 3. Waits and Queues

Abstract
Now that the road map has been built, you are on your way to a healthy SQL Server infrastructure. In this chapter, you will learn about one of the most effective methodologies for performance tuning and troubleshooting. The key methodology is waits and queues, which is an accurate way to determine why your SQL Server is performing slowly and to pinpoint where the bottleneck is. By analyzing the wait statistics, you can discover where SQL Server is spending most of the time waiting and focus on the most relevant performance counters. In other words, by using this process, you will quickly discover what SQL Server is waiting on.
Robert Pearl

Chapter 4. Much Ado About Indexes

Abstract
The keys to a healthy SQL Server are healthy indexes, and therefore I’ll cover indexes in this chapter. This chapter is an introduction to indexes and does not deep dive into index internals. Instead, the goal of this chapter is to provide you with some useful index analysis scripts and methods so you can understand how indexes affect the performance of your SQL Server. The primary things you need to look at in terms of having a healthy index strategy and therefore a high-performing SQL Server are as follows: missing indexes, too many indexes, duplicate indexes, and fragmented indexes. You’ll look at index usage statistics and how queries are affected, and I’ll discuss page splitting and fill factor. These are some of the highlights of this chapter:
Robert Pearl

Chapter 5. Tools of the Trade: Basic Training

Abstract
This chapter will discuss some key tools, utilities, and scripts provided by Microsoft SQL MVPs; these are people who are continuously in the field with their clients and have created tools that offer a better way to collect and analyze data, helping the SQL community and users of SQL Server worldwide. MVPs are indeed a charitable bunch, which makes their dedication and loyalty to the Microsoft SQL Server stack a unique character trait that has earned them MVP status. I have used these tools throughout my own DBA career and will direct you to where you can acquire and learn more about them.
Robert Pearl

Chapter 6. Expanding Your Tool Set

Abstract
The native tools that Microsoft provides to you become more flexible with each version released, adding more functionality to help database professionals leverage them and put them to use in practical ways. By enhancing your DBA tool set, you can rapidly deploy these techniques without much of a learning curve. I will expand your DBA tool set here and discuss the new tools and features in SQL Server version 2012, as well as other free and downloadable tools you should be aware of.
Robert Pearl

Chapter 7. Creating a SQL Health Repository

Abstract
You now have enough knowledge and technical foundation to put together all you know so far to create and build a DBA and SQL health repository. In this chapter, I will expand on the tools and scripts I have been discussing.
Robert Pearl

Chapter 8. Monitoring and Reporting

Abstract
Proactive, continuous monitoring and alerting are essential to managing multiple SQL Server instances. By setting up automated monitoring, you ensure that you are being proactive and not reactive to a potential technical issue or outage before escalation. With targeted monitoring, you can get in front of and resolve a situation before it becomes known to the general user population and management. There are a number of out-of-the-box solutions, as well as established third-party vendors. I will talk about and recommend some in this chapter.
Robert Pearl

Chapter 9. High Availability and Disaster Recovery

Abstract
Up until now, I have been talking thus far about the health and well-being of your SQL Server infrastructure and how to maintain and monitor it. However, there’s a time you hope never comes, but it is inevitable, and it’s a reality you must prepare for. Let’s cover what happens in the case of SQL Server sickness, that is, if your SQL Server instances crash and fail. If disaster strikes, whether the event is natural, technical, or man-made, how will you respond, and how will your organization recover? Can you ensure business continuity in the face of disaster? High availability and disaster recovery (HA/DR) address these concerns. Not only will I discuss strategy, I will talk about the features and technology around SQL Server to enable HA/DR. As part of achieving healthy SQL, you must prepare for the worst. A good disaster recovery plan is your insurance. This chapter is dedicated to this eventuality.
Robert Pearl

Chapter 10. Surviving the Audit

Abstract
In this chapter, I will discuss the various methods to retrieve audit-related information, such as the default trace, SQL Audit, DDL triggers, and more. I will explore the internals of the transaction log and give you a glimpse into how read it in its native hexadecimal format, which is how the popular third-party vendors do it in their compliance and data recovery software. Luckily, with the advent of SQL Server 2008’s Change Data Capture, you will see an easier way to capture DML.
Robert Pearl

Backmatter

Weitere Informationen

Premium Partner

    Bildnachweise