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Über dieses Buch

This open access book outlines development theory and practice overtime as well as critically interrogates the “cultural turn” in development policy in Latin American indigenous communities, specifically, in Guatemala, Honduras, Ecuador, and Bolivia. It becomes apparent that culturally sustainable development is both a new and old idea, which is simultaneously traditional and modern, and that it is a necessary iteration in thinking on development. This new strain of thought could inform not only the work of development practitioners, graduate students, and theorists working in the Global South, but in the Global North as well.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Open Access

Chapter 1. Introduction

Abstract
This chapter discusses the increased importance of indigenous culture and its potential contribution to sustainable development. Theoretical ideas such as transmodernity and neoliberal multiculturalism are introduced, issues of representation of indigenous ideas are discussed, and the outline of the book is presented.
Timothy MacNeill

Open Access

Chapter 2. Classic Ideas of Modernity, Culture, and Progress

Abstract
Ideas of development, and later sustainable development, did not appear out of nowhere after WWII. This chapter explores prewar origins of economic and cultural theories of development. The discussion focusses on ways that culture and development concepts appear in the classical political economy of people like Adam Smith and John Stuart Mill, and neoclassical economists from Pareto, to Hayek, to Keynes.
Timothy MacNeill

Open Access

Chapter 3. Culture in Critical and Sociological Thought

Abstract
Classical thought on culture and development was not all functionalist. Large critical traditions of thought emerged in the eighteenth century, and these would inform many later theories of international development. Marxian and Gramscian theories are discussed in this chapter, as are early sociological contributions from thinkers such Weber, Parsons, Veblen, and others.
Timothy MacNeill

Open Access

Chapter 4. Culture in Development Theory

Abstract
After WWII, development became a major global pursuit, and culture played a key role in ideas of how to nurture its occurrence. This chapter scrutinizes postwar, largely uncritical, development theory—focusing on the way in which culture appears in these ideas.
Timothy MacNeill

Open Access

Chapter 5. Culture in Critical Development Theory

Abstract
Especially in the postcolonial period, development thinking took a critical turn. Much of this new thinking originated as people from the Third World began to speak of development in the context of neocolonialism, while drawing on strains of critical political economy. The idea of culture played an increasingly important role as the concept of development was challenged from below. Increasingly, this involved powerful assertions from indigenous peoples, and a new focus around issues of environmental sustainability of food sovereignty.
Timothy MacNeill

Open Access

Chapter 6. Origins of a Maya Sustainable Development Movement

Abstract
This chapter discusses the emergence of a strong indigenous challenge to mainstream development that emerged in Guatemala. The historical and global changes that contributed to this idea are explored in detail. So are the deep cultural roots of Maya cosmovision, in which this idea is embedded. The chapter focusses around the story of one particular Maya organization called El Centro Pluricultural para la Democracia (the Pluricultural Centre for Democracy), from which the indigenous idea of culturally sustainable development emerged.
Timothy MacNeill

Open Access

Chapter 7. The Maya Idea of Culturally Sustainable Development

Abstract
After having discussed, via ethnography, the origins of the idea of culturally sustainable development in Guatemala, this chapter describes the idea itself as a development theory. Not only is Maya cosmovision given a central role in the chapter, but distinct programmes and community interventions are described as well. The deep political implications of indigenous sustainable development programmes are made clear when we consider conflicts between communities seeking to operationalize indigenous forms of sustainable development and international mining companies in Guatemala.
Timothy MacNeill

Open Access

Chapter 8. Garifuna Sustainable Development

Abstract
The methods and understandings introduced in previous chapters are used to discuss indigenous sustainable development as it is emerging amongst Afro-indigenous Garifuna in Honduras. Although Garifuna activists, thinkers, leaders, and practitioners share a close geographical relation to Maya groups, their challenges, cultures, and histories are substantially different. As a result, Garifuna sustainable development has its own distinct form, focused increasingly around territorial autonomy and food sovereignty.
Timothy MacNeill

Open Access

Chapter 9. Andean Indigenous Sustainable Development

Abstract
The most politically forceful, and institutionally integrated, form of indigenous sustainable development in Latin America has emerged in the Andean region—especially in Peru, Bolivia, and Ecuador. Although this region is home to multiple indigenous cultures, much weight is given to the Kechwa concept of Sumak Kawsay (living well). Owing to the power of the local indigenous movement, the idea has been most completely incorporated in Ecuador—where it is the central theme of the country’s most recent constitution. The Andean case study allows us to observe indigenous sustainable development in its most advanced form. The Ecuadorian example at once provides home for indigenous development, and a cautionary tale of its implementation.
Timothy MacNeill

Open Access

Chapter 10. Indigenizing Development

Abstract
This chapter compares, contrasts, and, where possible, incorporates indigenous concepts of sustainable development with “Western” ideas presented in earlier chapters. The goal here is to use Maya, Andean indigenous, and Garifuna development ideas to bend the sustainable development towards an indigenous perspective. The underlying question addressed is “can existing ideas of development bend to incorporate indigenous perspectives, or must they be jettisoned if indigeneity is to be meaningfully considered?”
Timothy MacNeill

Open Access

Chapter 11. Indigenous Sustainable Development

Abstract
This concluding chapter summarizes the findings of the book. This involves presenting somewhat of a guide to academics, communities, and practitioners that seek to support indigenous concepts of sustainable development. The chapter begins by describing what indigenous sustainable development is. Then the discussion changes towards modes of implementation. A central focus is given to items such as the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals and their resonances, and lack thereof, with indigenous ideas of development.
Timothy MacNeill

Backmatter

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