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Über dieses Buch

The book provides an in-depth knowledge on how a product is designed and developed by Product Designers. This has been achieved through a case study of one product – the Post Box. This product was chosen for the study primarily due to its simple and non-technical nature as that would make it easy for the readers to comprehend the design process. At the same time the Post Box posed all the challenges a designer would face while creating a new product.

Through a step by step process the book gradually takes the reader through the design and development journey – right from understanding the product, identifying the user need through market research, comprehending client’s brief, generating product ideas and concepts to development of prototype, manufacturing and final performance of the product. Interestingly, the book also includes how the product had to be modified after its initial launch as a large section of the public failed to identify it as a Post Box!

To make the book more stimulating, innovative case studies with interesting facts, figures and pictures on related issues like origin and evolution of Post Boxes in India and abroad are included. They are presented separately in boxes and columns without interrupting the flow of the core subject matter. The narrative and the language is simple and lucid and possibly balanced with a vivid formatting and layout that is easy on the eye.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

The Cause

Frontmatter

1. The Trigger

Abstract
It all started when I began parking my car next to a Post Box, located under a tree near my department of Industrial Design Centre (IDC), Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay (IITB). I used to see this rundown Post Box every day, with its faded red paint, rusted door hinges and the dangling half-open door with the letters exposed. I felt very uncomfortable looking at the Post Box, and its dilapidated condition continued to nag me. One day I went up to it and closed the dangling door. But the next day, it was back to square one with the door hanging out as though it was soliciting my help (Fig 1.1).
Battula Kalyana Chakravarthy, Janaki Krishnamoorthi

2. The Motivation

Abstract
Man’s tryst with design began with his recognition of a need. When an individual senses the need for something, he/she tries to find a way to fulfil that need. Beginning with the Stone Age, it is this factor that has been propelling the growth of design and development of products (Fig. 2.1).
Battula Kalyana Chakravarthy, Janaki Krishnamoorthi

The Context

Frontmatter

3. The Scenario

Abstract
Designing for the public domain is always a challenging task, as the product is generally used by a large cross section of the population and consequently has to meet their diverse aspirations. To understand these aspirations, a thorough user study covering various aspects – right from users’ requirements, their likes and dislikes – to product features as well as their cultural implications has to be undertaken before designing a new product (Fig. 3.1).
Battula Kalyana Chakravarthy, Janaki Krishnamoorthi

The Comprehension

Frontmatter

4. The Insight

Abstract
All the data collected through the various processes enumerated in the previous chapter provided us with some very interesting insights that helped us to generate a number of design ideas
Battula Kalyana Chakravarthy, Janaki Krishnamoorthi

The Check

Frontmatter

5. The Product Brief

Abstract
Once we were acquainted with the Post Box users and their requirements and became familiar with the product, its features and drawbacks, we focused on understanding what the client wanted from the new product. This process formulates the product brief, where the client lists out the needs the product should fulfil (like it should be durable, easy to maintain and convenient to use) and limitations (like cost constraints statutory requirements) within which the product should be developed.
Battula Kalyana Chakravarthy, Janaki Krishnamoorthi

The Conception

Frontmatter

6. The Idea

Abstract
Armed with sufficient data including the product brief, product shortcomings and user needs, we were in a position to find solutions to the problems faced by the users as well as address the shortcomings in the product. But what is the ideal solution that would resolve all the issues? This is difficult to answer unless the solution is looked at from various angles, that is, reflect on the solution holistically from different perspectives like materials to be used for manufacturing the product, production process, transportation, costs etc. By integrating the post-design stages into the design phase, we aimed to eliminate the snags that might occur and hamper our efforts to create a production-friendly and cost-effective product.
Battula Kalyana Chakravarthy, Janaki Krishnamoorthi

7. The Creation

Abstract
At this point we had a bank of ideas addressing various problems. While an idea might solve one problem, it could be less effective in solving another problem. In some cases, it may even be a hindrance. For instance, the idea of manufacturing the Post Box in stainless steel only deals with the criteria of making the new Post Box rustproof and strong. The joints of the top of the Post Box would still have to be welded, and this would be a potential cause for leakage of water, thus not meeting the crucial criteria of keeping the Post Box waterproof. Likewise, it also increases the product cost. Hence, different ideas are combined to arrive at concepts, which would address all the issues listed in the product brief.
Battula Kalyana Chakravarthy, Janaki Krishnamoorthi

The Crafting

Frontmatter

8. The Final Design

Abstract
There was one last step to be taken before we arrived at the final design – crafting the external appearance of the Post Box. A product’s appeal is largely dependent on its appearance: its shape, size, colour and texture. Providing the external facade of a product and giving it a personality is called styling (Fig. 8.1).
Battula Kalyana Chakravarthy, Janaki Krishnamoorthi

9. The Prototyping

Abstract
Until now the appearance, features and structure of the Post Box were available only in paper in the form of drawings, sketches and in exploratory CAD models. While designers can understand this form of product visualisation, a layperson cannot make much sense of it. When we made a presentation at this stage to Mr. Srivastava and his team, they were unable to comprehend the design on paper. Hence, they suggested that we create an actual prototype of the Post Box.
Battula Kalyana Chakravarthy, Janaki Krishnamoorthi

10. The Product

Abstract
The designers do not generally take up pilot projects. However, if they do, it is definitely advantageous, as they will have a better control over any alterations that may have to be made to suit the production process or to meet any cost reduction. In addition the changes required can be attended to without compromising on the original design value. These options will not be available when the pilot production is outsourced. Further there is a possibility of the production team altering the design in order to make their work easy, which may not be in the interest of the product or the user.
Battula Kalyana Chakravarthy, Janaki Krishnamoorthi

11. The Production

Abstract
The manufacturing of the Post Box was a collaborative effort between IDC and a few prominent industry partners, some of whom had joined us in making the prototype too. Usually, large companies are not interested in such small-scale or pilot projects, as they are time consuming with low or no returns. But IIT’s association coupled with the interesting nature of the project and its social relevance made this collaboration a reality.
Battula Kalyana Chakravarthy, Janaki Krishnamoorthi

The Connection

Frontmatter

12. The Launch

Abstract
At the time when the pilot project was completed, India Post was celebrating 150 years of its operations (Fig. 12.1). This seemed an opportune moment to launch the new Post Box. India Post officials also agreed and the new Post Box was unveiled on 18th October 2005 at Hotel Le Meridien, New Delhi, by Mr. Dayanidhi Maran, then Minister for Communications and Information Technology (Fig. 12.2). Soon after, the 25 boxes produced under the pilot project were installed in Delhi, Bombay, Chennai and Patna (Fig. 12.3).
Battula Kalyana Chakravarthy, Janaki Krishnamoorthi

Backmatter

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