Skip to main content
main-content

Über dieses Buch

Intelligent Support Systems for Marketing Decisions examines new product development, market penetration strategies, and other marketing decisions utilizing a confluence of methods, including Decision Support Systems (DSS), Artificial Intelligence in Marketing and Multicriteria Analysis. The authors systematically examine the use and implementation of these methodologies in making strategic marketing decisions.

Part I discusses the basic concepts of multicriteria analysis vis-à-vis marketing decisions and in new product development situations. Part II presents basic concepts from the fields of Information Systems, Decision Support Systems, and Intelligent Decision Support Methods. In addition, specialized categories of DSS (multicriteria DSS, web-based DSS, group DSS, spatial DSS) are discussed in terms of their key features and current use in marketing applications. Part III presents IDSS and a multicriteria methodology for new product development. Further chapters present a developmental strategy for analyzing, designing, and implementing an Intelligent Marketing Decision Support System. The implementation discussion is illustrated with a real-world example of the methods and system in use.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Marketing Decisions

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. Decision analysis and support

Abstract
The continuous and enormous increase in the complexity of organizations renders the decision making almost an impossible task to be managed by individual decision makers and generated the necessity for more efficient and effective administration and management procedures. In order to satisfy these requirements new scientific fields have emerged or expanded like management science, operational research, applied economic sciences, behavioural sciences, etc. The evolution of these research fields led to the systematic and scientific analysis and handling of administrative and managerial problems.
Nikolaos F. Matsatsinis, Yannis Siskos

Chapter 2. The structure of marketing decisions

Abstract
Today’s philosophy of marketing, places the customer-consumer in the center of consideration of the enterprises, while at the same time strives to achieve two goals:
1.
To satisfy in the best way the needs of the consumer, and
 
2.
To increase the profits of the enterprises.
 
Nikolaos F. Matsatsinis, Yannis Siskos

Chapter 3. Strategic Marketing Decisions

Abstract
The term “strategic marketing decisions” describes the set of activities of an enterprise that are oriented to the consumers (Fletcher, 1990). Terms such as business politics, strategic market planning, strategic marketing, business strategy, will be included, from now on, in the term “strategic marketing decisions”. By speaking more generally, we could say that the importance of various strategies varies according to the nature and the market position of each enterprise.
Nikolaos F. Matsatsinis, Yannis Siskos

Intelligent Support Systems

Frontmatter

Chapter 4. Information Systems

Abstract
It is very important to acknowledge that due to constantly and rapid changes in the market environment decision makers should possess at the right time the right information in order to arrive at the most appropriate decisions (Gale, 1992). Effective decision making within an enterprise calls upon the existence of on time and valid information (Schewe and Smith, 1980), thus providing additional advantages to any company against its competitors (Lewis, 1990). In their presentation, on the awareness of the information consequences, Garvin and Bermont (1983) state that every problem in an enterprise is in fact an information problem. Davis (1987) recognizes the underlying constraints for the decision makers, in the information process and problem solution, the variety and complexity of the required information, along with the existence of cooperation problems among decision makers and analysts regarding the determination of the information requirements. He proposes a gradual approach, consisting of five steps, in order to determine the information requirements for the development of a strategy.
Nikolaos F. Matsatsinis, Yannis Siskos

Chapter 5. Decision Support Systems

Abstract
In the beginning of 70’s, the notion of “Decision Support Systems” (DSSs) appears in the science literature, signifying a new perception of the role that computer systems can play in decision making procedures. The interpretation of the term is not always the same. The different point of views, from which researchers perceive and describe DSSs, have lead to the formulation of various definitions of the term DSS itself.
Nikolaos F. Matsatsinis, Yannis Siskos

Chapter 6. Advanced Decision Support Systems

Abstract
The stride in the field of information technology along with the low maintenance cost and usage independence of has lead in the development of more flexible and effective DSSs that operate in an interactive communication environment between user and system. This new DSSs generation was labelled by Courbon et al. (1977, 1979) as “Interactive Decision Support Systems (IDSSs)”. Systems of this type utilize the judgment and expertise of decision makers in order to guide them in decision-making through a trial and error procedure. The role of IDSSs is a continuous effort of gradual approach of the decision maker’s way of reasoning through his interaction with the system (Figure 1).
Nikolaos F. Matsatsinis, Yannis Siskos

Chapter 7. Intelligent Decision Support Methods

Abstract
The effort to create machines with some sort of intelligence began almost 100 years ago with the ideas of Babbage (1884) as shown in Figure 1. In 1950, Alan Turin, the “father of Artificial Intelligence” (Barr and Feigenbaum, 1981), presented the famous Turing test, which gives an answer to the question if a machine is able to think as a human being (Rich, 1983). Turing not only developed a simple, general and non-arithmetic computational model, but he also supported that computational models could possibly behave with a way that could be deemed “intelligent”. In 1950, Shannon supported that someone could play a game of chess with the help of computer and in 1955 he proved his idea by developing a chess program while, later Samuel (1963) developed a checkers program. Wiener (1948), founder of cybernetics, contributed by recognizing the similarities in functions of humans and machines. In overall, the actual goal of this effort was to understand and find a solution on how to embody in a computer the ability of human beings to think and rationalize (Durkin, 1994). The term “Artificial Intelligence” was used for the first time by John McCarthy (1963; 1969; 1977; 1980; 1995) during a conference held in Dartmouth College (1956).
Nikolaos F. Matsatsinis, Yannis Siskos

Chapter 8. Intelligent Decision Support Systems in Marketing

Abstract
In this chapter, we examine a recent class of systems that have the ability to process data and then by using reasoning to transform them into opinions, judgments, evaluations, and advises. With these systems the capability of reasoning is added to the functionality of the DSS, thus giving the ability to provide advises to specialized problems. Their focus is to support their users into the problem solving process rather than to substitute humans in decision-making. This new type of systems is the result of the cooperation of expert systems and decision support systems. The role of the ESs is to provide their heuristic reasoning and explanatory capabilities while DSS contribute with their analytical procedures and data management (Ford, 1985; Turban and Watkins, 1986; Henderson, 1987; Doukidis, 1988; Holtzman, 1989; Moore, 1992; Turban, 1993).
Nikolaos F. Matsatsinis, Yannis Siskos

New Methodology — Applications

Frontmatter

Chapter 9. New Product Development Methodology

Abstract
New products play a vital role in the successful growth of an enterprise. They consist a significant factor concerning the increase of the profits. All over the world enterprises are forced to innovation and new product development due to a variety of reasons such as the continuous changes in the consumers’ preferences, the ongoing competition, the establishment of new companies therefore of new competitors, the rapid advancement of technology, the frequent changes in legislation, and the existence of different legal systems from country to country. In order to survive, companies have to develop new products. Furthermore, the life cycle of most products becomes continuously smaller because of the technological obsolescence and the rapid rate in which usually consumers’ preferences change. Consequently, the need for innovation and expansion of the production lines in order to extend the life cycle of the products becomes continuously imperative for every enterprise and organization. This extension of the life cycle may be accomplished by the substitution of the product or by some changing some of its features, or by introducing a completely new product in the market.
Nikolaos F. Matsatsinis, Yannis Siskos

Chapter 10. Analysis and Design of MARKEX

Abstract
The aim of this chapter is to present a tool designed to support decision makers during the new product development process.
Nikolaos F. Matsatsinis, Yannis Siskos

Chapter 11. Applications in Marketing

Abstract
MARKEX has been used in the following real-world applications:
  • Design of a new flour product for a Greek flourmill company (Cretan Mills - ERGASYA, 1991).
  • Market survey of the Cretan olive oil in the Greek market (area of Athens) (Baourakis et al., 1995).
  • Market survey of the Cretan wines in the Greek market (area of Athens) (Siskos et al., 1995).
  • Market survey of the Cretan olive oil in the German market (Matsatsinis et al., 1995).
  • Market survey if the Cretan olive oil in the French market (Siskos et al., 2001).
Nikolaos F. Matsatsinis, Yannis Siskos

Backmatter

Weitere Informationen