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Über dieses Buch

This book discusses how Public-Private Partnership (PPP) is practiced in developed and developing economies. The book demonstrates how PPP as a concept has grown over the years with many governments particularly from developing economies/countries seeking to enhance infrastructure growth and development through this scheme. Further, the book explores how PPP has become the major infrastructure procurement policy adopted by many governments globally to address the rapid increase in demand for infrastructure due to the increase in population growth. Although, there are many available textbooks on PPP, this book is unique because it provides in-depth analysis and discussion on the international best practices of PPP from developed and developing economies perspectives. This book provides strategic measures, useful practices and information about the similarities and differences in PPP practices in developed and developing economies based on empirical evidence and case studies.

This book is structured in nine chapters. The first chapter explores the basic concept of PPPs. The second chapter looks at the global development and practices of PPP particularly from developed and developing economies’ perspectives. The third to the eight chapters explores critical topics and issues in international PPP practices from developed and developing economies perspectives. The topics included in this book are: governments motivations for adopting PPPs, barriers to PPP implementation, measuring PPP project success, risk management in PPPs, causes of conflict and conflict resolution mechanisms in PPPs and management of unsolicited proposals. The ninth chapter presents a comprehensive best practice framework for implementing international PPP projects.

This book is useful to undergraduate and postgraduate students in architecture, civil engineering, business, construction and project management, researchers interested in PPP topics, international investors and financiers, public authorities and departments and international development banks. This book provides in-depth insights and understanding on the best practices for PPP from the international perspective especially from the viewpoint of countries with diverse culture and policies. Importantly, readers will be adequately informed of the similarities and differences of PPP practices and processes in developed and developing economies based on empirical evidence. Investors and governments will be informed of the strategic plans and preventive actions to employ when engaging in PPP arrangements in any part of the world.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Frontmatter

Chapter 1. Introduction to the Public-Private Partnership Concept

Abstract
After the emergence of the public-private partnership (PPP) concept, several definitions and models have emerged globally. Further, different parties are involved in the delivery of PPP project. This chapter presents an introduction to the concept of PPP by looking at the various definitions and PPP models that have emerged globally. Further, the chapter explores the international process of procuring PPP projects and the key project parties involved in PPP project arrangements.
Robert Osei-Kyei, Albert P. C. Chan

Chapter 2. Global Implementation Practices of Public-Private Partnership

Abstract
Since the inception of the PPP concept, an increasing number of governments globally has shown strong enthusiasm towards the implementation of the policy. However, not all countries are on the same level of implementation, while some countries have seen significant boost in their PPP markets, others are yet to establish the enabling framework required for the implementation of the PPP policy. This chapter explores the evolution of PPP and its global implementation practices from developed and developing countries’ perspective. Further, the chapter discusses the experience of high-profiled international cases to explore the failure and success factors.
Robert Osei-Kyei, Albert P. C. Chan

Chapter 3. Reasons for Governments Adoption of Public-Private Partnership

Abstract
Following the evolvement of the PPP concept in the early 1990s, governments globally have shown strong enthusiasm towards the adoption of this concept in various infrastructure sectors. It is however not clear as to the motivations of these governments towards the adoption of the PPP concept. Many critics suggest that the main reason is due to the lack of funds, but is that the only reason? Further, different jurisdictions/economies have different conditions and political agendas, therefore it is possible that there could be some differences in the motivations of governments adoption of the PPP concept particularly among developing and developed economies. This chapter seeks to explore the above raised concerns and discuss comprehensively on the differences and similarities in reasons/motivation for PPP adoption by governments in developing and developed economies based on empirical data.
Robert Osei-Kyei, Albert P. C. Chan

Chapter 4. Factors Contributing to the Success of Public-Private Partnership Projects

Abstract
Since the evolution of PPP, few countries have succeeded in procuring many projects, whereas many others have seen little progress. Also, in the last decade, there have been several reported failed and distress PPP projects globally. Therefore, it is crucial that the best ways and practices of PPP are continuously monitored and evaluated to inform future project implementation. However, in exploring the success factors or best practices of PPP, there is a need to look at it from a cross cultural perspective rather than from a specific country/region viewpoint. In this regard, this chapter explores and discusses the success factors required for the effective implementation of PPP projects from two diverse economic regions (i.e. developing and developed economies) based on empirical data. Ghana and Hong Kong are used as representatives for developing and developed economies respectively.
Robert Osei-Kyei, Albert P. C. Chan

Chapter 5. Risk Assessment of Public-Private Partnership Projects

Abstract
Proper risk assessment is critical in PPP implementation. The risk management process and procedure in PPP arrangement are usually different from the other procurement methods particularly the traditional bid build method. This chapter explores the key risk factors associated with PPP implementation and evaluates them to identify the most critical ones. The risk assessment is discussed from developing and developed economies perspectives using Ghana and Hong Kong as case studies.
Robert Osei-Kyei, Albert P. C. Chan

Chapter 6. Model for Assessing the Success Index of Public-Private Partnership Projects

Abstract
Achieving PPP project success is paramount to project parties and stakeholders. However, the success of PPP projects has remained abstract which does not help in the effective implementation of the PPP policy. Therefore, it is important that a pragmatic approach is adopted to put the success of PPP projects in quantifiable terms to generate accurate and reliable information about the performance of PPP projects. Further, it is important that the success of different PPP projects should be compared to inform future implementation. This chapter develops a pragmatic tool that can be used to quantify the success levels of PPP projects.
Robert Osei-Kyei, Albert P. C. Chan

Chapter 7. Management of Unsolicited Public-Private Partnership Projects

Abstract
There are two major procurement routes for PPP projects; these are the traditional approach (solicited approach) and the unsolicited approach. Apparently, the traditional approach has been well documented and used across the world, however, the unsolicited has received little attention in the mainstream literature. In fact, many countries particularly those in the developing regions have increased their adoption of the unsolicited procurement method, meanwhile the unsolicited approach is tainted with allegations of corruption and nepotism. Further, it has been advocated that the unsolicited procurement method does not offer value for money to the public sector. Considering these, this chapter aims to holistically explore the salient issues in the management of unsolicited PPP projects. Specifically, the motivations behind its adoption and the effective ways of implementing it will be discussed using empirical evidence.
Robert Osei-Kyei, Albert P. C. Chan

Chapter 8. Conflict Management in Public-Private Partnership Projects

Abstract
Conflict is certainly inevitable in public-private partnership (PPP) due to the long-term agreement and multiplicity of stakeholders with varying beliefs and interests. However, the thorough understanding of how conflict could be managed among project parties and stakeholders can help minimize the occurrence of it in PPP project arrangement. This will thereby reduce the negative repercussions of conflict occurrence in PPP arrangements. Considering these, this chapter discusses comprehensively on the management of conflict in PPP by focusing on its root causes, resolution mechanisms and prevention strategies.
Robert Osei-Kyei, Albert P. C. Chan

Chapter 9. A Best Practice Framework for Public-Private Partnership

Abstract
This chapter presents a practice framework for implementing successful PPP projects. The practice framework consists of a checklist of best practices which both contracting authorities and private sector partners should consider and adhere to in order to achieve successful PPP projects. Emphatically, the best practices proposed are based on the empirical findings reported in the previous chapters. The best practices are then incorporated in the PPP process.
Robert Osei-Kyei, Albert P. C. Chan

Backmatter

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